• Moving to a new normal: What you need to know
    News

    Moving to a new normal: What you need to know

    Phase 1 of reopening: How to balance the 'new normal' while keeping COVID-19 in check.

  • ‘P-Valley’ Creator Katori Hall on Why the Word ‘Pussy’ Was Censored in Starz Show’s Title
    Entertainment
    The Wrap

    ‘P-Valley’ Creator Katori Hall on Why the Word ‘Pussy’ Was Censored in Starz Show’s Title

    Even for those not already familiar with Katori Hall’s stage play “Pussy Valley” about a Mississippi strip club, it’s not hard to guess what the first letter in her Starz series “P-Valley” really stands for. As creator, writer, showrunner and executive producer of the upcoming series set to debut Sunday, the title was the only sticking point she ran into with Starz during the show’s development.“That was the only fight I got into,” she said with a laugh during a recent interview with TheWrap. “Starz was a great husband. You always have one fight with your husband, and that was the one.”Hall explained that, initially, the network had been on board with the original “Pussy Valley” title… but then they ran into a speed bump in the road.Also Read: Starz's 'P-Valley' Trailer Finds Glitz, Glamour and Grit in a Mississippi Delta Strip Club (Video)“The problem came up when Starz reached out preemptively to the carriers — Comcast, Time Warner — and asked them about placing the show on their platform. What came back was a resounding, No, we are not putting no show that got pussy in the title on our platform,” she said. “So, it ended up being a business decision. We did not want to create this amazing show that was breaking all these barriers and representing Black women in a unique and nuanced way to not be seen. I felt some type of way about it, but I did not want to block access to what I think is a groundbreaking show.“But rather than changing the title to a completely different phrase, Hall decided to keep the “P” intentionally in order to make a point.“It was absolutely a way to show people we have been censored,” she said. “And that’s OK, because things that pertain to women tend to be censored, and they tend to be taboo. The fact that the show is set in a strip club is a taboo thing to do. It’s kind of a wink and a nod to the humor that I think is woven throughout the show. You know, it’s [supposed] to be ‘Pussy Valley,’ but for y’all folks clutching your pearls? We’ll call ourselves ‘P-Valley.'”Also Read: Justin Timberlake Says Confederate Statues in Home State Tennessee 'Must Come Down'Hall also reflected on the unique timing of the show’s release, as across the nation, Black Lives Matter protests continue to take place months after George Floyd was killed by Minneapolis police.“It has always been important to tell the stories of Black women, queer folk, poor folk. It’s just that now, the world seems to be ready to listen,” she said. “As a Black woman, that’s the work that I’ve always been dedicated to putting out into the world, and I’m just grateful that in Hollywood right now people are demanding complicated and nuanced representations of the Black experience because we know what not having humanistic stories does to a people. The fact that we have inherited all these stereotypical images, it has made people not understand who we are as human beings. That we are worthy of respect, worthy of love, worthy of the right to breathe. So what I think storytelling does — it creates a moment to understand a group of people that people have dehumanized for centuries. ““P-Valley” premieres Sunday, July 12 at 9/8c on Starz.Read original story ‘P-Valley’ Creator Katori Hall on Why the Word ‘Pussy’ Was Censored in Starz Show’s Title At TheWrap

  • What Is Byte, the App That Just Passed TikTok on App Store Charts?
    Technology
    The Wrap

    What Is Byte, the App That Just Passed TikTok on App Store Charts?

    A TikTok competitor named Byte experienced a record number of installations and passed TikTok on the Apple App Store charts today after President Trump and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo both publicly flirted with the idea of banning TikTok from U.S. users.Sensor Tower data reported Byte’s installation count spiked July 9, when it was downloaded 622,000 times — the most downloads since the app launched in January 2020. “This was the most downloads it has ever seen in a day, up 47 percent from about 422,000 downloads on January 25 right after launch,” Sensor Tower mobile insights strategist Stephanie Chan told TheWrap.Chan said the download spike was directly related to recent talk of the U.S. banning TikTok. “The spike does correlate with the White House’s comments about a potential TikTok ban in the U.S.,” Chan said. “Anecdotally, on July 8 and 9, we saw a number of user reviews mentioning TikTok, so that also seems to point to the White House’s comments as the reason for the increased interest.”Chan added that Byte rolled out an update July 6, but that the update was to make minor improvements and fix bugs — “so that update probably doesn’t account for the spike.”Byte launched in January 2020 and was created by former Vine co-founder and general manager Dom Hofmann. Twitter acquired Vine in fall 2012, and shut down the app’s operations by October 2017. Hofmann began work on Byte in December 2017, originally intending for it to be a clone of Vine. The current Byte app is similar to TikTok, and lets users capture and edit short looped videos to post to social feeds.Also Read: 'Monster Hunter' Video Game Adaptation With Milla Jovovich Moves Back to April 2021Sensor Tower estimates Byte has 2.5 million downloads worldwide on both iOS and Android since its launch.TikTok has 2.3 billion users globally. The app was originally called Douyin and launched in China in 2016. After acquiring Shangai and Santa Monica-based startup Musical.ly in 2017, TikTok’s Chinese-based parent company ByteDance consolidated the two into one app, rebranding it as TikTok to launch it in the United States in August 2018. The control of TikTok by the Chinese government and concerns that it could use the software to snoop on unsuspecting Americans through their phones is what’s prompted Pompeo and Trump to openly consider a ban.“This (2.3 billion users) figure also includes the Chinese version of the app, Douyin, and it excludes downloads from third-party Android marketplaces in China,” Chan said of TikTok’s total download count.Sensor Tower reported TikTok was the most downloaded non-gaming app in June with over 87 million installations — a roughly 53% increase from June 2019.While it doesn’t come close to TikTok’s user count, Byte is currently the top-ranked free download on the Apple App Store, while TikTok is No. 3, after video conferencing software Zoom. Byte and TikTok did not respond to TheWrap’s request for comment.Hofmann did recently respond to popular game streamer Tyler “Ninja” Blevins, who tweeted he deleted TikTok, claiming it was “data farming” and is run by an “intrusive company.” Blevins added that he did try out Byte, but said, “there’s byte, but I’ve seen it and tried to use it, just not as clean and seamless as TIKTOK. Just waiting (at the moment).” Hofmann simply replied to Blevins, “damn, headshot.”Byte isn’t the only TikTok competitor to get a boost from skeptical TikTok investors and users. Shares of social media app Snap rose nearly 8% on Tuesday, hitting a high of $25 per share, the highest since its March 2017 IPO.I have deleted the TIK TOK app off all my devices. Hopefully a less intrusive company (data farming) that isn’t owned by China can recreate the concept legally, such funny and amazing content on the app from influencers.— Ninja (@Ninja) July 9, 2020damn, headshot— dom hofmann (@dhof) July 9, 2020Read original story What Is Byte, the App That Just Passed TikTok on App Store Charts? At TheWrap

  • Teacher says school reopenings would be 'epidemiological nightmare' as thousands sign remote learning petition
    News
    Yahoo Life

    Teacher says school reopenings would be 'epidemiological nightmare' as thousands sign remote learning petition

    A new petition argues that teachers should not return to school until their respective counties have no new coronavirus cases for 14 days.

  • Josh Cooley to Direct Live-Action ‘Little Monsters’ at Universal
    Entertainment
    The Wrap

    Josh Cooley to Direct Live-Action ‘Little Monsters’ at Universal

    Josh Cooley, the director and writer of Pixar’s “Toy Story 4,” will next direct an all-ages film called “Little Monsters” at Universal, an individual with knowledge of the project told TheWrap.“Little Monsters” will be a live-action and animation hybrid that will bring Universal’s classic monster movie characters to a new generation. The film will be inspired by the artwork, outlines and character designs of famed concept artist Mark “Crash” McCreery, who is best known for his work on films like the original “Jurassic Park” trilogy, “Rango” and “Van Helsing.”Cooley is writing the script and will also direct. Todd Lieberman and David Hoberman of Mandeville Films (“The Aeronauts,” “Beauty and the Beast,” “Wonder”) will produce. McCreery will executive produce.Also Read: Josh Cooley to Direct Animated 'Transformers' Prequel For Hasbro, eOne and ParamountPlot details are being kept under wraps.Universal has been committed to revitalizing its stable of classic monster movie characters, with the success of Blumhouse’s updated take on “The Invisible Man” from earlier this year, as well as plans for a new version of “The Wolfman” that will star Ryan Gosling.Cooley is a veteran storyboard artist at Pixar who is credited on animated films such as “Cars,” “Ratatouille” and “Up.” “Toy Story 4” was his debut feature film after directing the shorts “George and A.J.” and “Riley’s First Date” based on the “Inside Out” character Riley Andersen. “Toy Story 4” surpassed $1 billion at the global box office last year.Also Read: Josh Cooley to Write and Direct 'Malamander' for Sony PicturesCooley is also attached to direct an animated “Transformers” prequel movie for Hasbro, eOne and Paramount, and a live-action feature called “Malamander” at Sony.Cooley is represented by CAA as a director, Grandview and Jackoway Austen Tyerman Wertheimer Mandelbaum Morris Bernstein Trattner & Klein.THR first reported the news.Read original story Josh Cooley to Direct Live-Action ‘Little Monsters’ at Universal At TheWrap

  • Keedron Bryant, teen whose song 'I Just Wanna Live' went viral, is working on new music after signing record deal
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Life

    Keedron Bryant, teen whose song 'I Just Wanna Live' went viral, is working on new music after signing record deal

    Keedron Bryant, teen who went viral singing 'I Just Wanna Live,' is working on new music after signing major deal with Warner Records.

  • Ghislaine Maxwell's Bail Hearing Will Take Place Next Week
    Celebrity
    Town & Country

    Ghislaine Maxwell's Bail Hearing Will Take Place Next Week

    She faces multiple charges related to the sexual abuse of young women and girls.

  • Following Network Complaints, Nielsen to Reinstate Out-of-Home Ratings Integration for Fall (Updated)
    Business
    The Wrap

    Following Network Complaints, Nielsen to Reinstate Out-of-Home Ratings Integration for Fall (Updated)

    Updated on Friday, July 10, 2020 at 1:38 p.m. PT:Nielsen reversed its decision to postpone its implementation of out-of-home viewing into national ratings data, which is now again scheduled for the fall.The ratings currency company’s Thursday announcement that it was delaying the implementation of viewership in bars, restaurants, airports and hotels, among other platforms, took networks by surprise. It was also not well-received. Video Advertising Bureau (VAB) president and CEO Sean Cunningham blasted the decision in a letter to Nielsen on Friday morning.“‘Blindsiding’ is perhaps the politest way of characterizing how under-communicated and contradictory this morning’s announced decision from Nielsen was,” Cunningham wrote. “As all of my members have been in frequent, weekly conversations with their Nielsen counterparts, including recent exchanges about this specific topic (2020 integration of OOH viewing data into National TV currency) the ‘postponement’ was received as an extremely BAD SURPRISE by my industry leaders, who were stunned by the lack of dialogue about this decision/topic before yesterday’s phone calls and this morning’s announcement.”Also Read: Bye, Bye 'Blindspot': How NBC Drama Lost Its 'Voice' - and Then Its ViewersNielsen initially elected to delay the integration due to the impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on out-of-home audiences, since “stay-at-home” orders meant that very few people were watching sports in bars or catching news programming in hotels and airports.Nielsen CEO David Kenny sent the following letter on Friday explaining its about-face:At Nielsen, we take pride in providing the market with transparent metrics that our clients can use to transact with confidence.Earlier this week we communicated a delay to our plans to integrate out-of-home audiences into the National TV currency this fall. Our concern was about consumer behavior, and not the Nielsen methodology. While out-of-home audiences have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, our methodology is strong and the data is reflective of consumer behavior.That said, after speaking with many clients and learning more about your specific agreements for the upcoming season, it became clear that we had misunderstood the extent to which upfront deals have already been agreed to using out-of-home metrics. Given the circumstances, we recognize that a delay would cause greater disruption to the industry than maintaining our original plan. I also believe Nielsen needs to deliver on our promises, so that you can transact with trust and confidence. Therefore, Nielsen will move forward with the integration of out-of-home TV viewing into the National TV currency measurement starting in September 2020, as originally planned. We will also provide additional data on out-of-home behavior to help you interpret behavior shifts during the pandemic.We regret any disruption we may have caused you, your customers, and the market this week. Going forward, we are committed to ensuring a more complete, inclusive, and transparent process as the currency evolves with changing consumer behavior.Respectfully yours,David Kenny CEO. and Chief Diversity Officer NielsenAlso Read: Newsmax Whiffs in Nielsen Ratings Debut, Averages Just 21,000 Viewers in First WeekIn Nielsen’s Thursday decision, the company said it would still continue to offer its out-of-home metric, something that has been long-sought for by TV networks in the face of dwindling live ratings, as a separate standalone service. But Cunningham argued Nielsen was contradicting itself by doing that, and said that out-of-home viewing was relatively stable during the pandemic.“The Nielsen OOH data is either fit to be currency or it is not,” he wrote. “Our experts have seen less statistical bounce and less volatility in the OOH data than in other Nielsen currency products, thus “COVID” as decision-driver does not ring true.”ViacomCBS also criticized the delay: “Nielsen’s abrupt delay of the long-planned integration of OOH viewing into the National TV currency less than two months before it was scheduled to be implemented is unacceptable and unjustifiable,” a ViacomCBS spokesperson said in a statement. “ViacomCBS – along with our peers and the VAB – is calling on Nielsen to reverse its decision.”Read original story Following Network Complaints, Nielsen to Reinstate Out-of-Home Ratings Integration for Fall (Updated) At TheWrap

  • ‘Monster Hunter’ Video Game Adaptation With Milla Jovovich Moves Back to April 2021
    Entertainment
    The Wrap

    ‘Monster Hunter’ Video Game Adaptation With Milla Jovovich Moves Back to April 2021

    “Monster Hunter,” a Paul W.S. Anderson film based on the Capcom video game franchise and starring Milla Jovovich, has had its release pushed back by Sony and Screen Gems to April 2021.“Monster Hunter” was meant to open Sept. 4, 2020, but will now hit theaters on April 23, 2021. The film now opens the same day as Edgar Wright’s “Last Night in Soho.”Jovovich reunites with her “Resident Evil” director Anderson in “Monster Hunter” and stars with Tony Jaa, T.I. and Ron Perlman.Also Read: Sony to Invest $250 Million in 'Fortnite' Developer Epic GamesIn the film, Jovovich plays Artemis, a lieutenant who, along with her loyal soldiers, is forced to fight for survival when they are dropped onto a dangerous new world crawling with massive monsters with incredible powers.The game franchise dates back to 2004 with the original “Monster Hunter” on the PlayStation 2. In it, players are required to hunt, slay and research monsters around the world and protect nearby villages from attack, all the while upgrading their armor and resources in order to take down increasingly more powerful monsters.The game has had four more main sequels — including most recently “Monster Hunter: World” released in 2018 on the PS4 and the Xbox One — and the franchise has been spun off in numerous different forms.Also Read: 'Disco Elysium' Series Based on Video Game in Development From 'Sonic the Hedgehog' TeamAnderson wrote and directed the film, his first feature since concluding the long-running “Resident Evil” franchise with “Resident Evil: The Final Chapter” in 2016. He’s also behind the first “Mortal Kombat” video game adaptation from 1995.Anderson recently boasted about the CGI achievement of the film, saying that the monsters in “Monster Hunter” are more impressive than the dinosaurs seen in the new “Jurassic World” movies, even referring to “Monster Hunter” as “‘Lawrence of Arabia’…but with monsters.”“All our monsters are 50-60 feet tall. They’re really amazing. We’re building them in even more detail than the dinosaurs of ‘Jurassic World,'” Anderson said in the August issue of Empire Magazine (via SyFy). “And they look even better, because we shot on real locations in South Africa and Namibia, which gives the animators something to really match into: real wind, real dust, real sun-flare. The monsters are the only CG thing in there.”Read original story ‘Monster Hunter’ Video Game Adaptation With Milla Jovovich Moves Back to April 2021 At TheWrap

  • The 14 Best Sales to Shop Right Now
    Lifestyle
    PureWow

    The 14 Best Sales to Shop Right Now

    After another long week, we’re in need of a little retail therapy. Anyone else? Fortunately, a ton of brands are having amazing sales at the moment. From Nordstrom’s Clearance Sale...

  • Grow it, show it, eat it: gorgeous in bloom, cardoons are like artichoke without the hard work
    Lifestyle
    The Guardian

    Grow it, show it, eat it: gorgeous in bloom, cardoons are like artichoke without the hard work

    Grow it, show it, eat it: gorgeous in bloom, cardoons are like artichoke without the hard work. Beloved by florists and chefs alike, cardoons are worth planting for aesthetics alone, but are as easy on the palate as on the eye

  • 10 TV Shows Based on Podcasts Ranked, From ‘Homecoming’ to ‘2 Dope Girls’ (Photos)
    Entertainment
    The Wrap

    10 TV Shows Based on Podcasts Ranked, From ‘Homecoming’ to ‘2 Dope Girls’ (Photos)

    “Homecoming” is back and “Dirty John” will be returning for its second season on June 2. Here are other TV shows based on successful podcasts, with their Metacritic ranking (as of May 24, 2020).“Up and Vanished” (2018 – ) Metacritic score: n/aPayne Lindsey’s true-crime podcast first became a successful two-part special on Oxygen, exploring the disappearance of Georgia schoolteacher Tara Grinstead. And then it became a series, with Payne and his team exploring a new cold case in each episode.“Alex Inc.” (2018)Metacritic score: 49Zach Braff plays a journalist who quits his job to start his own podcast business — in a short-lived ABC sitcom very loosely based on Alex Blumberg’s “StartUp” podcast about the founding of his own Gimlet Media podcast network.“StarTalk” (2015 – ) Metacritic score: 55Astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson adapted his hit podcast into a long-running talk show on NatGeo, with a wide variety of guests beyond the science (and even sci-fi) field.“Dirty John”  (2018 – ) Metacritic score: 58Connie Britton and Eric Bana starred in the first season of this true-crime anthology series based on the Wondery podcast about love gone wrong. The second season starred an ill-fated coupled played by Amanda Peet and Christian Slater.“Lore” (2017-18) Metacritic score: 60Aaron Mahnke’s podcast exploring the true histories behind horror legends like werewolves and vampires inspired an anthology series that blended dramatic scenes, animation and narration and ran for two seasons on Amazon.“Limetown” (2019)Metacritic score: 62Jessica Biel starred in this Facebook Watch series that told the fictional story of the disappearance of 300 people at a Tennessee neuroscience facility. But the show failed to capture the creepy immersiveness of the original podcast and lasted only one season.“The Ricky Gervais Show” (2010-12) Metacritic score: 62The creator of “The Office” adapted his radio show (with Stephen Merchant and Karl Pilkington) into a podcast, and then into an animated HBO series that made its potty-humor jokes literal.“Comedy Bang! Bang!” (2012-16)Metacritic score: 67Scott Aukerman adapted his comedy podcast into a parody talk show that ran for five seasons on IFC.“Homecoming” (2018 – )  Metacritic score: 76Julia Roberts starred in the first season of this show, based on Gimlet’s fictional podcast about a secret government program to transition U.S. war veterans back to civilian life.“2 Dope Queens” (2018 – ) Metacritic score: 87“Daily Show” alum Jessica Williams and Phoebe Robinson adapted their hit comedy podcast into an HBO series that hits a broad range of topics.Read original story 10 TV Shows Based on Podcasts Ranked, From ‘Homecoming’ to ‘2 Dope Girls’ (Photos) At TheWrap

  • ‘You’ Star Penn Badgley Says We’re More Like Serial Killer Joe Than We Think
    Entertainment
    The Wrap

    ‘You’ Star Penn Badgley Says We’re More Like Serial Killer Joe Than We Think

    For two seasons on Netflix’s “You,” with at least one more still to come, Penn Badgley has lived inside the mind of a serial stalker and killer. Badgley’s inhabited the character of Joe Goldberg as he’s made targets out of women, lied and manipulated his way into their lives and brought death to anyone who stood in his way.It’s an experience that Badgley describes as “isolating,” but in a way that might be dangerously familiar to anyone watching. “I’m continually surprised by how deep of a metaphor we’re working with this guy,” Badgley said in an interview with TheWrap. “Because there comes a point where when he kills somebody, that’s his response in this story, but we do the same thing in our minds in relationships. We come to believe that the other person in the relationship is the reason that we’re unhappy.”It’s a line of thinking drilled into us by the love stories we’re told, stories more interested in sweeping emotion than healthy, well-maintained relationships, Badgley says.“To me, it’s kind of like taking the tropes of modern relationships that we see — which I don’t think are actually healthy functional relationships — and it’s basically just showing us a logical end,” he said. “It’s like, look, this is actually that feeling. When you fucking hate somebody, and you imagine your mind all the ways that you could get out of this scenario that you, that you won’t take responsibility for, that’s Joe.”Read the full interview with Badgley below.Also Read: Inside 'You' Season 2's Big Twist and What That Ending Means for JoeNetflixTheWrap: I wanted to start with the move to Netflix. We saw the show explode in popularity between Season 1 and Season 2 as new viewers found the show, what was your experience of that like?Badgley: I mean, there was a definite difference, just in the fact that it didn’t have that exposure. And on Lifetime it was much harder to gauge what people thought about it. And, therefore, I think the sort of moral ambiguity of the show and the centering of a character like Joe, I think was definitely a huge question mark … But I think once it went to Netflix and people just overwhelmingly responded, I think that was when I was able to appreciate, “Okay. So this is, it is really striking a chord. It’s pretty relevant in whatever ways it’s relevant.” So I think for me, it was encouraging and heartening, especially going into the second season with a guy who is was just so clearly a villain but given the sort of role of a hero.You tweeted a while back telling people they should not be attracted to Joe. Was there something in particular that made you feel it was important to clarify that?Well, I mean, so to be, to be very frank, I mean, I think the first time I ever tweeted anything about that, I was … it was somewhat offhand. It wasn’t meant it wasn’t measured. I wasn’t being extremely thoughtful about it. I chose to get on Twitter to see what kind of response it was having — I think it was mid-January, so the show had been out for about two weeks; I was about to do a bunch of press in Asia for it. So I think that’s what I was like, “I wonder what people are really thinking about this.” So I was just scrolling through a lot of the responses and I just, I noticed what we would call “thirst” for the character.Look, I mean, it wasn’t remotely surprising, and was it truly disturbing? No. Because I mean, we all knew that was going to happen, but so I just thought I would playfully interact with that … It seems to have taken off and, what’s meaningful for me, is that it has opened up the door to actually have far more meaningful conversations about the themes that the show is working here.A lot of Season 1, for the viewer, was kind of about seeing how far Joe was willing to go, but Season 2 really sees him trying to pull back and do things differently. For you as an actor, did your approach to the character change at all?It didn’t really change, I don’t think. Except that it just deepened, and it just became more of what it was. The approach that I have with my coach, I work with, I would say it’s very spiritual, and it doesn’t give a lot of attention to the, I don’t know, techniques and other models. To me, it’s just about being present with the words that you’ve got to say. And I just really, really honed in on that, I think. And there are times where I think it really paid off. And then there are times where I grapple with what is really possible for a man who is capable of what Joe was doing, could he really be that sympathetic. Could he really be that sensitive and caring and charismatic? I’m not sure, but I think I just try to be as present as possible and to mean everything I say, you know?Also Read: 'You' Renewed for Season 3 at NetflixNetflixTo the point about being present, when you think about acting opposite Victoria [Pedretti], versus Elizabeth [Lail], did it feel different?Yeah. They are very different actresses, and they have very different trajectories as characters. So actually everything about it was quite different. The first season was really hard because every time– The first season felt darker to me. I don’t know what it feels like to viewers, but to me, because always knowing that Beck was going to die was really hard. It was really hard to get behind Joe and believe him. And even when I watch it, I can see myself struggling with that. Whereas, I feel like there was less of that in Season 2, because I knew that at least there was some level of parity, some level of equality, some level of– if it’s not justice, it’s at least something closer to equality.Season 1 followed the book much more closely than Season 2 followed the sequel.Yeah, a lot more.Was that part of it, in terms of knowing the ending and what was coming? Did you read the book?Yeah. I read the first book, and I read some of the second, but I think because it was such a departure, reading the first one was all I needed in terms of understanding the essence of the concept and what Carolyn Kepnes created. And then, actually, I think to a point reading book two was almost problematic because of how different Joe is. I mean, the truth is Joe in the books is a heinous, monstrous, right? Sex addict and his psychosis is in a way, much harder hitting, much deeper cutting. That for me, as a man, at least was very hard to read. I think, interestingly, a lot of women defined a certain affinity with the book for reasons that are complex and you could spend the whole interview on. But I think for me, I really had to at some point choose to depart from the Joe in the books because it’s just not what we’re doing.I do want to ask in what specific ways you feel that they’re different. The two characters feel very different, but when you look at it on paper, he’s doing a lot of the same things.He does the same things, but I think we — whether this is wrong or right, better or worse — I think we’ve made Joe a lot more palatable. We had to somewhat revise the peaks and the valleys that you go through as a reader with Joe, because, keep in mind, the device is something you cannot literally translate. You’re actually inside Joe’s head in the book. The medium is just so different. To really be in that mind and to bring it to life and see it more visually, I think would be quite disturbing. Think about some of the things that happen in the book. They’re so much more graphic, and I think because there’s a certain, there’s a safety in reading where you kick yourself along as the reader. When you’re watching something, it’s a different goal. It’s a lot more passive. So I think, so in a way, if we really brought Joe to life from the books, it would be more violent. It would be more like an attack … To me, the difference really is that he has to be a more sympathetic character in a visual medium. He just has to be. So you have these abusive relationships with these young people to kind of do that, like Paco is key.The dimension of Joe from the books that I focused on is this sincere desire to investigate and know the inner essence of another person. I focused on that. And I think that informed my approach probably more than anything.Also Read: 'You' Season 2 Star Breaks Down Character's Tragic Finale DeathNetflixOne of the really fun things as a viewer watching Season 2 was seeing him move to LA and seeing how he interacts with a different kind of city culture. For you as an actor, how much did that element of setting factor into what you were doing?Well, it was a different experience. I mean, I found being Joe in LA was more isolating. It was probably also partly because I wasn’t in my own home. I was actually displaced. And playing Joe is isolating anyway. [But] overall, I had a more enjoyable experience in Season 2. It’s hard to recall what it was, but I think I was able to have more fun with Joe because I’d already gotten in the water. I think the first season was just constantly struggling with like, “Damn this dude,” you know? But the second time around I was able to play with it more, I think. And I don’t know if you see that on the camera, but.One thing Sera [Gamble, showrunner] really emphasized is that the show has no interest in redeeming Joe. But there is a point in those later episodes where it does seem like he’s at the very least willing to accept the consequences of what he’s done.Yeah.That doesn’t come to bear, but have you thought at all about what that would’ve meant for Joe and how that might’ve affected him as a person?Yeah, obviously I’ve thought about it a lot, but I don’t know what it would mean because in a sense it didn’t really happen. It’s like he came dangerously close to the event horizon of a black hole, but he didn’t cross it … If Joe is really a real person, what would it take to redeem someone like him? And I think this is a legitimate question. We can probably ask anybody because it’s like, what does it take? What do we mean when we say redemption or justice? What does that actually mean for him? Does it mean death? Does it mean prisons? Is it possible for someone who’s done those things to transform? Actually? I mean, these are actually really big questions. And so, to me, I think the entire show is kind of like an exercise in exploring that question. Because it has to do with why we also were so willing to watch a show about a guy like this.Do you feel like your thought processes on those questions have changed since you’ve done the show?I don’t know that they’ve radically changed, but they’ve probably developed.NetflixWhen you think about the way that the season ended and how Love ultimately comes to him on his level, is that a good thing for Joe? A bad thing for Joe?Well, I think it’s good. It’s good for Joe, and it’s good for the viewer because he’s confronted the very thing that he wanted. That he believes he wanted. And he realizes, “Oh, that’s not even close to what I wanted.” Because what he actually wants– I mean, he’s such a damaged, traumatized person, and he’s become so awful and blind and abusive that what he actually wants is to destroy people. What he actually wants is to control people and annihilate them. But he thinks that he wants to love them.I’m continually surprised by how deep of a metaphor we’re working with this guy. Because there comes a point where when he kills somebody, that’s his response in this story, but we do the same thing in our minds in relationships. We come to believe that the other person in the relationship is the reason that we’re unhappy, as opposed to understanding that we have personal work to do to realize that no one can actually fulfill the needs that we have, our deepest most, our deep most needs. And that actually the point of a relationship is not to be made happy and to be fulfilled by another person. That actually, a healthy relationship doesn’t serve that purpose in your life. What we should be doing is sacrificing our desires and learning to be of service to each other.But the model of relationships in storytelling that we see in TV and movies, most of the time, is not that at all. It’s only the beginning when you fall in love, which is basically the same thing as taking drugs. It’s like, “How high can we get? How high can we get off of each other?” And then once that’s gone, “Well, we’re going to break up. Or we’re going to end the movie and assume that everything works out.”So, to me, it’s kind of like taking the tropes of modern relationships that we see — which I don’t think are actually healthy functional relationships — and it’s basically just showing us a logical end. It’s like, look, this is actually that feeling. When you fucking hate somebody, and you imagine your mind all the ways that you could get out of this scenario that you, that you won’t take responsibility for, that’s Joe. He’s just been following the logic really awfully. So that’s the way that I find him to be a really compelling, the whole show and him to be this really compelling journey.Like you said, it’s kind of the project of the show to explore these questions without answering them definitively either way.Yeah, not at all.But do you get the sense that this is a thing, this is the lesson that Joe could learn? Is that even possible in his world?I mean, it could be that if Joe really learns that, the whole premise of the show starts to unravel, right? What would it mean for him to learn that? I mean, I think it’d be really compelling to see him start to learn it, but I think past a certain point the show then no longer– It kind of undoes itself. But I think this is actually what the creators have in mind at some point … What would that mean? And I think Greg and Sarah are very smart, and they’ve probably been thinking about this the whole time.I know some of the writing for Season 3 is already underway. Have you read any of it yet? Do you know what’s in store?No. I know almost nothing. I just know that there’s a baby.What’s your sense of what that means for Joe personally and his relationship with Love?At least for me, I know that by the end of every season so far, it’s kind of dawned on me how it is such a functioning metaphor for the way that we all struggle personally in relationships when we are selfish. Ultimately this comes down to this thing where it’s like, “Are we self-serving? Or are we serving others?” Are we self-serving, or self-sacrificing? Joe ultimately always chooses himself. And I think that’s going to be reflected now in the dynamic of parenthood and family households more than it has. So I’m really interested to see what that means. But I really don’t know. How does a child change him? And how does a child not change him? I think that’s going to be a really, really interesting question.Netflix“You” Seasons 1 and 2 are available to stream on Netflix.Read original story ‘You’ Star Penn Badgley Says We’re More Like Serial Killer Joe Than We Think At TheWrap

  • How Easy Is It to Cheat on the SATs, Anyway?
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  • 7 TV Shows That Have Cracked Real Mysteries, From ‘The Jinx’ to ‘Unsolved Mysteries’ (Photos)
    Entertainment
    The Wrap

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    The debut of Netflix’s “Unsolved Mysteries” reboot earlier this month has brought about a clamoring for cold cases to be brought to justice. In that spirit, we’ve compiled a list of TV shows that have actually solved crimes, exonerated people, and found answers to the unknown, from “The Jinx” miniseries that lead to the arrest of Robert Durst, to “Extinct or Alive,” which found a living animal thought to have died out over a hundred years ago.“Unsolved Mysteries”Back before the Netflix reboot, this classic series was on network television. Creator Terry Meurer told TheWrap that during its original 23-year run, the series helped to solve over 260 cold cases. She has high hopes that the Netflix reboot will have the same luck.“Cold Justice”This crime series from Dick Wolf and Magical Elves, which works with local law enforcement to solve cold cases, has resulted in 45 arrests and 18 convictions, according to Oxygen.“The Jinx”This Robert Durst miniseries, written by “All Good Things” director Andrew Jarecki, lead to Durst’s long-awaited arrest for the murder of Susan Berman just one day before the finale of “The Jinx” aired on TV. Durst had admired Jarecki’s work on “All Good Things” and had offered to be interviewed for the miniseries.“Extinct or Alive”This one has more to do with animals than humans, but we have to give Animal Planet credit for discovering live members of a species that was believed to have been extinct. Last year, series host and biologist Forrest Galante found a female Fernandina Tortoise, presumed extinct since 1906, on a remote volcanic island in the Galapagos.“Expedition Unknown”Host Josh Gates took part in the unveiling one of the treasure boxes that were buried nearly 40 years ago by Bryon Preiss, whose 1982 book “The Secret” encourages people to solve puzzles in order to locate 12 boxes he buried in different American cities. In one episode, Gates meets a family who located the Boston box.“America’s Most Wanted”This longrunning Fox series was successful in finding many fugitives wanted by the FBI, including Ricky Allen Bright, Steven Ray Stout, Robert Lee Jones, and more, according to CBS News.“Curb Your Enthusiasm”This Larry David HBO series unknowingly captured the key to freeing Juan Catalan, a man who was on death row for a murder he did not commit. “Curb” had been filming at Dodger Stadium on the day of the murder, providing evidence that Catalan was watching the game with his 6-year-old daughter and could not have been at the crime scene. Catalan and David both later appeared in the 2017 Netflix documentary “Long Shot.”Read original story 7 TV Shows That Have Cracked Real Mysteries, From ‘The Jinx’ to ‘Unsolved Mysteries’ (Photos) At TheWrap

  • ’30 Rock’ Reunion: Liz Lemon Shames Maskless New Yorker in First Teaser for NBC Special (Video)
    Entertainment
    The Wrap

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    Liz Lemon has no patience for maskless men.NBC shared the first teaser for the upcoming “30 Rock” reunion episode set to air on the broadcast network and sister streaming platform Peacock next week, featuring a masked Tina Fey shouting at a man on the sidewalk for not wearing a mask during the pandemic.Announced last month, the hour-long special will see main cast members Tina Fey, Alec Baldwin, Tracy Morgan, Jane Krakowski and Jack McBrayer reprise their roles to tout NBCUniversal’s 2020-21 programming.Also Read: NBC Sets Televised '30 Rock' Reunion Special as Part of Upfront EventThe special, which comes as part of NBCUniversal’s upfront event, will feature guest appearances from talent from across the company’s portfolio to highlight programming from NBC, Telemundo, USA Network, SYFY, E!, Bravo, etc., including sports, entertainment and news.The commercial-free broadcast will air Thursday, July 16 at 8/7c and will be rebroadcast across the company’s cable networks and made available to stream on Peacock the following day.Peacock — NBC Universal’s entry into the crowded streaming service market, will debut on Wednesday, July 15.The special is produced by Broadway Video and Little Stranger, Inc. in association with Universal Television and NBCUniversal Creative Partnerships. Oz Rodriguez directs.Watch the teaser above.Read original story ’30 Rock’ Reunion: Liz Lemon Shames Maskless New Yorker in First Teaser for NBC Special (Video) At TheWrap

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  • ‘Palm Springs’ Is the Perfect Rom-Com for Commitment-Wary Millennials
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  • ESPN Reporter Adrian Wojnarowski Apologizes for ‘F– You’ Email to Sen. Josh Hawley
    Sport
    The Wrap

    ESPN Reporter Adrian Wojnarowski Apologizes for ‘F– You’ Email to Sen. Josh Hawley

    ESPN NBA reporter Adrian Wojnarowki apologized for dropping an F-bomb in an email to Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Missouri), calling the action a “regrettable mistake.”“I was disrespectful and I made a regrettable mistake,” Wojnarowski said. “I’m sorry for the way I handled myself and I am reaching out immediately to Senator Hawley to apologize directly. I also need to apologize to my ESPN colleagues because I know my actions were unacceptable and should not reflect on any of them.”pic.twitter.com/wsBNk9Jv2y— Adrian Wojnarowski (@wojespn) July 10, 2020Also Read: Marv Albert to Skip NBA's Orlando Restart Due to Florida Coronavirus Surge“This is completely unacceptable behavior and we do not condone it,” said ESPN in a statement. “It is inexcusable for anyone working for ESPN to respond in the way Adrian did to Senator Hawley. We are addressing it directly with Adrian and specifics of those conversations will remain internal.”Wojnarowki was responding to a press email sent my Hawley’s office criticizing the NBA over its decision to allow players to wear social justice messages on their uniforms when the league resumes its season later this month. Hawley referenced the league’s handling of the controversy last fall when Houston Rockets general manager tweeted in support of Hong Kong protesters and said the NBA was “sanctioning political messages.”Wojnarowski responded to the press email by writing “f— you.”Hawley, a first-term senator who defeated two-term Democrat Claire McCaskill in 2018, has been among the league’s biggest detractors over its relationship with China, which was strained following Morey’s tweet. In recent weeks, China has enacted a national security law that removes the “high degree” of legal and political autonomy promised to the territory after it was handed over to China from the U.K. in 1997.Read original story ESPN Reporter Adrian Wojnarowski Apologizes for ‘F– You’ Email to Sen. Josh Hawley At TheWrap

  • The 11 Best Summer Blankets for Hot Sleepers
    Lifestyle
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  • Ghislaine Maxwell Requests Bail Release Due to COVID-19 Pandemic
    News
    The Wrap

    Ghislaine Maxwell Requests Bail Release Due to COVID-19 Pandemic

    Ghislaine Maxwell on Friday requested that she be released from New York’s Metropolitan Detention Center on bail and placed in home confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic.Maxwell’s attorneys proposed bail conditions that include a $5 million personal recognizance bond “co-signed by six financially responsible people,” forfeiture of her travel documents, home confinement with GPS monitoring aside from court appearances and meeting with attorneys and limited visitation by “immediate family, close friends and counsel.”“As this Court has noted, the COVID-19 pandemic represents an unprecedented health risk to incarcerated individuals, and COVID-19-related restrictions on attorney communications with pretrial detainees significantly impair a defendant’s ability to prepare her defense,” Maxwell’s attorneys wrote in court documents filed on Friday. “Simply put, under these circumstances, if Ms. Maxwell continues to be detained, her health will be at serious risk and she will not be able to receive a fair trial.”Also Read: Ghislaine Maxwell Declared Extreme Flight Risk, Government Demands DetainmentLast week, prosecutors argued that Maxwell should be denied bail because she “poses an extreme risk of flight,” due to her wealth and citizenship in two foreign countries.But her attorneys disputed that Maxwell is a flight risk, noting that she only “left the public eye” for the “understandable purpose of protecting herself and those close to her from the crush of media and online attention and its very real harms.”“But sometimes the simplest point is the most critical one: Ghislaine Maxwell is not Jeffrey Epstein,” the attorneys said. “Ms. Maxwell vigorously denies the charges, intends to fight them, and is entitled to the presumption of innocence.”Maxwell, 58, was arrested last week on charges that she conspired to recruit, groom and sexually abuse minors — some as young as 14 years old — with Jeffrey Epstein, the financier who died by suicide while awaiting trial on federal sex trafficking charges. She faces up to 35 years in prison if convicted of the charges.Her arraignment is scheduled for Tuesday.Read original story Ghislaine Maxwell Requests Bail Release Due to COVID-19 Pandemic At TheWrap

  • Bye, Bye ‘Blindspot': How NBC Drama Lost Its ‘Voice’ – and Then Its Viewers
    Entertainment
    The Wrap

    Bye, Bye ‘Blindspot': How NBC Drama Lost Its ‘Voice’ – and Then Its Viewers

    NBC will put “Blindspot” in its rearview mirror on July 23, when the drama comes to a (likely very quiet) conclusion after five seasons. The Jaimie Alexander vehicle was once a strong performer when it came to Nielsen numbers, but that was a long time ago on a different night of the week and in a very different TV ecosystem. Last night, in its penultimate week (“Blindspot” is off next Thursday) of original episodes, “Blindspot” aired two episodes, the second of which tied the series low in key demo ratings and set a new low in total viewers. (OK, so the new audience low set that mark by all of 2,000 people and it could theoretically adjust up in final tallies or catch up with delayed viewing, but a low is a low is a low.) Also Read: Ratings: 'Burden of Truth' and 'In the Dark' Finales Leave The CW, Well, in the Dark Much like its current linear ratings, the summer 2020 sendoff is a far cry from when “Blindspot” began, when digital viewership was still somewhat in its infancy and the drama had hit series “The Voice” as its lead-in. In its first season, “Blindspot” averaged a big...Read original story Bye, Bye ‘Blindspot': How NBC Drama Lost Its ‘Voice’ – and Then Its Viewers At TheWrap