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We tried Singapore’s best-rated yong tau foo

Finally, I have the chance to feature one of my favourite foods in our best-rated series: yong tau foo. The pressing question: will it outshine my top 3 gatekept places? We shall find out!

best rated yong tau foo - eatery front
best rated yong tau foo - eatery front

I headed over to 90 Circular Road in search of 109 Yong Tau Foo, situated just minutes away from Boat Quay. This standalone eatery has amassed a total of 388 reviews, and has received 4.4 stars out of 5 on Google reviews (at time of writing).

For those who may find directions challenging, it’s worth noting that the eatery is conveniently situated directly opposite the Galaxy Pods Capsule Hotel.

Several patrons have commented that the establishment tends to get crowded during lunchtime, although the queues disperse quickly. Feedback suggests high praise for the delectable laksa gravy, while some mention that the dry version tends to be slightly salty.

best rated yong tau foo - ingredients
best rated yong tau foo - ingredients

I arrived at 11.10am, 10 minutes after opening, and there wasn’t a queue in sight. For a brief moment, it felt that the impressive display spanning over 45 ingredients was prepared just for me (ah, wishful thinking).

best rated yong tau foo - ingredient choosing
best rated yong tau foo - ingredient choosing

A written sign indicated a minimum order of 6 pieces (S$0.90 each), and given the extensive variety of options, I found myself pondering on the selection for each bowl.

best rated yong tau foo - crowd
best rated yong tau foo - crowd

As it approached noon, a stream of office professionals started to arrive, and in no time, a considerable crowd had gathered inside; luckily, I arrived early!

What I tried at 109 Yong Tau Foo

best rated yong tau foo - dry
best rated yong tau foo - dry

I began my tasting journey with the Noodle Dry (S$0.90) version and chose bee hoon as my base. The selected ingredients on top included yam, beancurd, tau kwa, eggplant, bitter gourd and otah roll, all doused in a viscous brown gravy. It cost me a total of S$6.30.

best rated yong tau foo - bee hoon tossing
best rated yong tau foo - bee hoon tossing
best rated yong tau foo - bee hoon closeup
best rated yong tau foo - bee hoon closeup

I tossed everything to allow the thick gravy to evenly coat every fine strand of bee hoon, resulting in a rich, garlicky flavour within every bite.

best rated yong tau foo - yam & bittergourd
best rated yong tau foo - yam & bittergourd

The yam exhibited a pleasing softness and an authentic taste, while the bitter gourd, remarkably fresh, carried only a subtle hint of bitterness.

best rated yong tau foo - fried ingredients
best rated yong tau foo - fried ingredients

I found satisfaction in the fact that certain ingredients underwent a 2nd round of frying before being served. This additional step notably elevated the flavours, particularly enhancing the taste of the otah roll and eggplant.

best rated yong tau foo - laksa
best rated yong tau foo - laksa

With great anticipation, I looked forward to my next bowl of yong tau foo, this time with yellow noodles and an extra addition of Laksa Gravy (+S$1.20), bringing the total cost to S$6.60 for 6 pieces.

best rated yong tau foo - gravy
best rated yong tau foo - gravy

The Laksa Gravy, with its creamy and thick consistency, embodied all the essential characteristics crucial for a delicious broth. Despite my usual preference for yellow noodles exclusively in mee rebus, the combination with the rich and coconut-infused gravy proved to be exceptionally satisfying.

best rated yong tau foo - tofu closeup
best rated yong tau foo - tofu closeup
best rated yong tau foo - dip in sambal
best rated yong tau foo - dip in sambal

The tofu and seafood paste combination was silky-soft and melted like butter in my mouth. Paired with the accompanying sambal on the side, it introduced an umami-filled burst of flavour derived from the dried shrimps.

best rated yong tau foo - dip in sambal
best rated yong tau foo - dip in sambal

I particularly enjoyed one of the beancurd rolls which had strips of carrot stuffed within.

best rated yong tau foo - mushrooms
best rated yong tau foo - mushrooms

The Shimeiji mushrooms imparted an earthy undertone to the bowl, while the you mai cai contributed light and crispy textures, effectively balancing the richness of the laksa and preventing it from becoming overpowering.

best rated yong tau foo - noodle soup
best rated yong tau foo - noodle soup

We ended things off with the thick bee hoon Noodle Soup (S$0.90) with long cabbage, lady’s finger, fishball, huge wanton, fishcake with crab stick, and, once again, my favourite: eggplant.

best rated yong tau foo - soup upclose
best rated yong tau foo - soup upclose

The soup, while light on the palate and exceptionally clean-tasting, had a drawback— it leaned towards being somewhat bland, resulting in the thick bee hoon‘s flavour becoming a little overwhelming.

best rated yong tau foo - wanton closeup
best rated yong tau foo - wanton closeup

The oversized wanton skin, filled with a blend of minced meat and carrots, might have showcased its flavours more effectively in the dry version. Nevertheless, it retained a decent taste despite becoming slightly soggy as it soaked in the soup.

best rated yong tau foo - crabstick tofu
best rated yong tau foo - crabstick tofu

The fishcake had a delightful crispy exterior, and I particularly enjoyed the hidden bits of crab stick within, adding another layer of flavour.

best rated yong tau foo - sweet sauce added
best rated yong tau foo - sweet sauce added

Don’t forget to grab some of the sweet sauce available on the counter to enhance your dining experience.

Final thoughts

best rated yong tau foo - overview
best rated yong tau foo - overview

In conclusion,I found myself preferring the laksa and dry versions over the soup variety. The ingredients exhibited freshness and the range of choices was substantial.

However, in the competition among my top 3 yong tau foo spots, it didn’t manage to surpass them. Nonetheless, I consider it to be above average which explains its popularity amongst the CBD crowd.

Head on down to 109 Yong Tau Foo and give it a try.

Expected damage: S$5.40 – S$9 per pax

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