Ayumi Hamasaki’s biographical novel 'M' to be made into drama series

Producers will soon cast actors for a drama series based on Japanese singer Ayumi Hamasaki's biography. (Photo: Reuters)

Queen of J-pop Ayumi Hamasaki has come thus far not without setbacks. The ups and downs of the life of the 40-year-old songstress have been documented in her biographical novel M - There is A Lovable Person (romanised title: M ai subeki hito ga ite).

Fans of Hamasaki would find this title familiar. It’s taken from her iconic song from 2000, titled M, which opens with Hamasaki’s distinct voice with the words “Maria ai subeki hito ga ite”. (How nostalgic!)

Nostalgia aside, her biographical novel of the same title written by the author Komatsu Narumi, will be made into a drama by TV Asahi next April. The drama is set to air in Japan on Saturday late nights.

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Since the biography’s release on 1 August this year, fans have been guessing who will make it to the lead role, with many putting their bets on Erika Sawajiri, who is known for her role in 1 Litre of Tears.

Furthermore, the novel reveals the relationship between Hamasaki and Avex chairman Max Matsuura, which made people even more curious who will play the male lead. But it will take a while for the cast to be finalised, so there is nothing left to do but to keep calm and wait patiently.

According to Yasushi Akimoto, who is a music producer, lyricist and producer of idol group AKB48, the novel is the success story of a young lady which shows the fame and glory as well as the dark side. He described the novel as a relatable story of how a woman gave her all to grab hold of dreams, fell in love and got hurt. In addition, EXILE HIRO also commented that it is a story of passion, dreams, love, encounters and separations.

In the words of the J-pop diva herself, “If someone was to ask me, ‘Have you ever loved someone so much in your life before?’ I would answer without a doubt, ‘Yes, I loved a guy to the extent of destroying myself.’”