Todd Snyder and Timex's New Watch Is a Work of Modern Art

·2-min read
Photo credit: Courtesy
Photo credit: Courtesy


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At this point, if you're not thoroughly familiar with the ongoing collaboration between Timex and Todd Snyder, I have to assume you've never landed at Esquire dot com before. So, for those of you who need a quick rundown, first, let me say welcome. Then, allow me to briefly explain that the long-running collab is the gift that keeps on giving, bringing Snyder's sharp eye for style to Timex's wear-'em-everyday, always-reliable watches. Sometimes, Snyder pulls from the archives, updating past designs with a couple of modern twists. Other times, he creates something entirely new and exciting that still manages feel just familiar enough—something you'll be imagining it on your wrist from the first time you see it until you actually snag one for yourself.

The new Modern Art falls in the latter camp. Inspired by the works of Color Field painters from the '40s and '50s in New York—think Rothko and his cohort—as well as other mid-century abstract artists, the new design brings a graphic treatment to the face with hour and minute markers rendered in contrasting circles with bold numerals. The squared-off hands, too, get a similar treatment, with a contrasting red stripe running down the center. It's a distinctive look, and certainly not the sort of thing you see every day. And, well, that's the whole point.

Beyond its impressive aesthetics, the watch has some classic Timex bona fides when it comes to the whole "takes a licking and keeps on ticking" promise the brand is famous for. The 40mm case is water-resistant to 50 meters, the pebbled leather strap practically screams "I'll look even better years from now," and the Indiglo backlight (along with luminous hands) means you can keep an eye on the time even in the darkest of conditions. Of course, to truly appreciate the Modern Art, you'll probably want a little more light on the situation. Maybe pop by a museum; I hear they have pretty nice lighting. And you can check out Rothko and co. while you're at it.

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