Teo Heng KTV is here to stay, and the other KTV chains that we missed

Wenting Ang
·Contributor
·3-min read

While Singaporeans panicked after unconfirmed reports on 21 Jan that Teo Heng KTV will be closing all of their outlets, the KTV chain took to Instagram to reassure fans that they will still be in operation, working out details with some of their landlords over rent issues. With increasing community cases in Singapore, the pilot that allows a selected number of karaoke outlets, including Teo Heng KTV, and nightclubs to reopen with stringent safe management measures is now being postponed till further notice.

Until we can all be safe while enjoying quality karaoke time with friends and family, here is a list of our favourite karaoke chains that we can reminisce on the good times spent and look forward to visiting after the pandemic.

1) Teo Heng KTV

Known as the most affordable karaoke chain, Teo Heng KTV’s widely accessible outlets, both in town and in heartlands, along with their “bring your own food and drinks” policy makes the chain a hit with Singaporeans. Charging per room instead of per pax, their competitive prices meant a party of 10 using their biggest room for the three-hour package would be charged only $0.73 per person, per hour.

Being in the business for 31 years, Teo Heng KTV had, in recent months, made headlines for refusing to retrench their staff despite the forced shutdown due to the pandemic; paying their staff’s salaries in full since circuit breaker; donating couches from their closed outlets to elderly and needy families.

Hopefully, things work out between Teo Heng KTV and their landlords, and we can have something exciting to look forward to after the pandemic.

2) Cash Studio Family Karaoke Box

Established in 2003, Cash Studio Family Karaoke Box has seven outlets across Singapore with some offering spacious VIP rooms and cosy private rooms for private gatherings during pre-COVID times. Their cheapest timeslot was weekdays, non-peak hours, at $7.90++ per pax for a three-hour block.

Since Dec 2020, Cash Studio Family Karaoke Box revamped some of their outlets, including Clarke Quay Central, Singpost Paya Lebar and Prinsep street outlets, transforming into an eatery, selling food and drinks without karaoke services. With hotpot as part of their menu, the chain encourages customers to book their rooms for a private gathering, adhering to the government’s safe management measures, to enjoy music or even have a “zoom conference with friends all over the world”.

3) 10 Dollar KTV Club

Contrary to their name, prices at 10 Dollar KTV Club are rarely $10 although they are also cheaper amongst Singapore’s karaoke chains. With a minimum group size of three or four persons, a three-hour or five-hour slot will cost between $11 to $12.90 per pax depending on the timeslot.

10 Dollar KTV Club has three outlets, Chinatown, Balestier, and Pasir Ris across the island, and had not updated their socials since May 2020. Hopefully, we will see more from the joint after the pandemic.

4) Manekineko KTV Singapore

Buying over KBox, Manekineko KTV Singapore has 10 outlets across Singapore, with the majority located around in the central region. The Japanese brand is the go-to karaoke chain for fans of Japanese pop and rock pre-COVID.

Prices here are significantly more expensive than the other chains, with its priciest option at $48 per pax for three hours. However, the price also comes with a free-flow buffet dinner, allowing you to sing and dine simultaneously. Their weekday lunch package, which includes three hour of singing, buffet lunch, and free-flow drinks, is only $28.

5) Sing My Song Family Karaoke

With two outlets located at PLQ Mall and Jurong West, Sing My Song Family Karaoke brands themselves as a family-friendly karaoke chain that has “updated sound system to provide music lovers with ample space yet keeping the price affordable for everyone”.

Sing My Song Family Karaoke is one of the few karaoke chains approved for the reopening pilot, which is now postponed. They had earlier revamped their PLQ outlet into SMS Cafe, selling food and drinks, including mocktails and beers, while waiting for the reopening.

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