• First trailer for 'Train to Busan' sequel 'Peninsula' showcases zombie chaos
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Movies UK

    First trailer for 'Train to Busan' sequel 'Peninsula' showcases zombie chaos

    Director Yeon Sang-ho's follow-up to the surprise zombie hit has certainly upped the ante with the undead.

  • 'Train to Busan' director teases 'wider scope' of zombie sequel 'Peninsula'
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Movies UK

    'Train to Busan' director teases 'wider scope' of zombie sequel 'Peninsula'

    Yeon Sang-ho teased that 'Peninsula' will be a much bigger zombie thriller than its 2016 predecessor.

  • Simon Pegg and Nick Frost pay homage to 'Shaun of the Dead' in coronavirus video
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Movies UK

    Simon Pegg and Nick Frost pay homage to 'Shaun of the Dead' in coronavirus video

    We shouldn't go to the Winchester and wait for all this to blow over.

  • Zombie movies won't die, but maybe it's time they did?
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Movies UK

    Zombie movies won't die, but maybe it's time they did?

    Bill Murray and Adam Driver star in zombie film The Dead Don't Die - but the genre is on its last legs

  • Selena Gomez, Adam Driver and Bill Murray's Trailer for Zombie Film 'The Dead Don't Die' Drops
    Entertainment
    Entertainment Tonight

    Selena Gomez, Adam Driver and Bill Murray's Trailer for Zombie Film 'The Dead Don't Die' Drops

    The trailer for director Jim Jarmusch's highly anticipated zombie film, 'The Dead Don't Die,' was released on Monday.

  • Why can we plan for a Zombie Apocalypse but not for our own death?
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Style UK

    Why can we plan for a Zombie Apocalypse but not for our own death?

    What you would do in a Zombie Apocalypse is one of the topics up for discussion in the latest episode of Yahoo UK's podcast Britain is a Nation of...

  • Netflix is developing a 'Resident Evil' TV series
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Movies UK

    Netflix is developing a 'Resident Evil' TV series

    And it'll tie to the movie reboot.

  • Review: 'Rampant' is an ambitious film that could have used its zombies better
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Movies Singapore

    Review: 'Rampant' is an ambitious film that could have used its zombies better

    If you've always wanted to watch a zombie film but were too terrified to, then "Rampant" is the perfect film as a tamer version of the usual zombie film, but with excellent production values.

  • 'Night of the Living Dead': Zombie classic is relevant as ever at 50
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Movies UK

    'Night of the Living Dead': Zombie classic is relevant as ever at 50

    The film that launched the undying zombie hordes remains a terrifying, socially conscious classic a half-century after its release.

  • Singapore's first zombie film 'Zombiepura' hits screens in October
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Movies Singapore

    Singapore's first zombie film 'Zombiepura' hits screens in October

    Director Jacen Tan's horror-comedy "Zombiepura" is set in an army camp in Singapore overrun by the living dead.

  • Night of the Living Dead director George A Romero has died
    News
    Yahoo Movies UK

    Night of the Living Dead director George A Romero has died

    Legendary filmmaker George A. Romero has died, following a brief battle with cancer.

  • Review: ‘Resident Evil: Vendetta’ has genuinely scary moments
    News
    Yahoo Movies Singapore

    Review: ‘Resident Evil: Vendetta’ has genuinely scary moments

    “Resident Evil: Vendetta” is a Japanese 3D animated action horror-thriller in English. It is the third 3D animated film in the “Resident Evil” franchise, and takes place in the same shared universe as the “Resident Evil” games. It is not in the same shared universe as the live action “Resident Evil” films.

  • Review: ‘I Am a Hero’ ups the standard of zombie violence
    News
    Marcus Goh

    Review: ‘I Am a Hero’ ups the standard of zombie violence

    Secret ending? No.Running time: 127 minutes (~2 hours)“I Am a Hero” is a zombie horror film that is adapted from the manga series of the same name. A manga artist finds himself in the middle of a zombie apocalypse and must rise to the occasion if he is to survive this disaster. It stars Yo Oizumi (Hideo Suzuki), Kasumi Arimura (Hiromi Hayakari), and Masami Nagasawa (Yabu). It is rated M-18.“I Am a Hero” will inevitably be compared with “Train to Busan” since they are both Asian zombie films that have come out in the same year. However, it’s best to go in without expectations since they are two totally different beasts. Their only commonality is zombies, and beyond that, it’s really apples to oranges.Word of advice: don’t bring food in. You might not be able to finish your snacks.HighlightsFast paced actionThere are no elaborate duels or tricky chase sequences in “I Am a Hero” — zombie battles are hardcore, violent scrimmages that always end in a fatality (whether it is human or zombie). It goes against the grain of the usual graceful fighting styles of zombie hunters, because here they either take a pick in the head or a shotgun to the face. The wanton violence increases the pace of the film and creates stronger tension because we can’t anticipate what will happen next, and you’re never quite sure if they’ll succeed in lopping off the zombie’s head or only part of his jaw.Character evolutionAlthough it’s telegraphed from the very beginning, Hideo’s character evolution is unlike the usual story arc because even in the later Acts, he’s still ineffectually cowering for his life. Yet you can tell that he desires to be a great hero one day, and this juxtaposition of passivity and imagination is what builds up our sympathy for him. He might not be the traditional zombie film hero, but you’re still rooting for him.Horrifying zombies and injuriesZombies are never cleanly defeated here. They’re shredded, piece by piece, by suboptimal weapons like golf clubs or staple guns, and require a good portion of their head to be destroyed before they finally stop moving. In fact, zombies bite the faces of humans a bit too often in this film. It’s always cringe inducing, and you don’t just get blood everywhere. It’s a hearty helping of innards, flesh, and blood that splatter the floors of the film.LetdownsHiromi Hayakari could have been replaced by a large cardboard cutoutHiromi fulfils an indeterminable role in the film. I mean, what exactly is she supposed to be? She’s liability, asset, love interest, and a hundred other things, but the film never follows through on what exactly she’s supposed to be. It’s not that she could be easily replaced either, because she does serve a plot function. It’s just that she seems to be a multi-purpose cardboard cutout that becomes whatever is necessary for the movie to move on. At least she’s a pretty cardboard cutout.Some portions are over the top and cartoonyThe movie is distinctly Japanese because the imaging for the zombies can get hilarious at times. The closeup of their veins popping as their faces distend is something that could work for an anime, but looks incredibly unrealistic in what is otherwise a gory, bloody film. In an odd way, it works because it disarms you into thinking it will be some silly zombie show, then sends maniacal face eaters against the protagonists to horrify you with the level of violence.“I Am a Hero” ups the standard of zombie violence.Should you watch this at weekday movie ticket prices? Yes.Should you watch this at weekend movie ticket prices? If you like zombie films.Score: 3.5/5“I Am a Hero” opens in cinemas:- 20 October 2016 (Singapore)Marcus Goh is a Singapore television scriptwriter. He’s also a Transformers enthusiast and avid pop culture scholar. He Tweets/Instagrams at Optimarcus and writes atmarcusgohmarcusgoh.com. The views expressed are his own.

  • Review: ‘Seoul Station’ a desperate attempt to cash in
    News
    Marcus Goh

    Review: ‘Seoul Station’ a desperate attempt to cash in

    Secret ending? No.Running time: 92 minutes (~ 1.5 hours)“Seoul Station” is an animated Korean zombie horror movie that’s the prequel to “Train to Busan”. It sees an estranged couple struggling to make their way to safety after a zombie outbreak erupts all around them. It features the voice talents of Ryu Seung-ryong (Suk-gyu), Shim Eun-kyung (Hye-sun), and Lee Joon (Ki-woong). It is rated NC-16"Seoul Station” is a shining example of how South Korea is technically proficient in creating animated features, but completely lacks the art design and vision to execute a good story. It has all the elements required to be a good animated film, and individually the elements work (except for the art direction, which is downright ugly). Yet it’s put together in such a patchwork manner that the end product is, at best, a watchable film. It’s no “Train to Busan” and its release now feels like a desperate attempt to cash in on its far superior sequel.HighlightsSome humour elements in an otherwise bleak showIt’s odd that there are comedic moments in a zombie movie, but it works well in the context of “Seoul Station”. It comes across as dark humour, but it’s also quite obvious that this is an unintentional effect. Nevertheless, it helps to give "Seoul Station” its own character, rather than just being a film that’s related to “Train to Busan”.LetdownUgly character designsThere’s no doubting that the animation quality in “Seoul Station” is top notch. But the art director has some of the ugliest character designs ever to grace the big screen. The problem is that the characters don’t look realistic either, which is usually the reason for ugly designs. This means that we’re watching a group of unrealistic, unappealing creatures prance around avoiding zombies, which defeats the purpose of watching anime (which is to see a romanticised view of the world).Inconsistent zombie mechanics with “Train to Busan”“Train to Busan” had pretty specific rules for its zombies. They don’t attack you if they don’t see you and infections are almost immediate. “Seoul Station” has zombies which act contrary to this, which doesn’t make sense. Why watch a movie about a different species of zombie when you’re here to specifically see the “Train to Busan” zombies in action? For all intents and purposes, “Seoul Station” is just another, unrelated zombie film that also happens to take place in Korea.No scares and no tensionThe zombies are not scary, chiefly because they don’t have that awkward gait they did in “Train to Busan” and they don’t come at you like tsunamis. These were the very elements that made the zombies horrifying then, and they’re not here. Instead, we get… close-ups of zombie faces. Random insertions of meaning and symbolismThe film plays out like a regular zombie apocalypse movie until the last Act, when it suddenly turns into a social commentary about the downtrodden in society. Suddenly the characters develop intense urges to make up for their childhood losses, and random Christian imagery pops up. It’s like they completed two thirds of the animation when the director suddenly realised he needed to add some symbolism into the film, and dumped it all in at the last minute. “Seoul Station” is a huge disappointment after the masterpiece that was “Train to Busan”.Should you watch this if it’s free? Yes.Should you watch this at weekday movie ticket prices? No.Score: 2.5/5“Seoul Station” opens in cinemas:- 29 September 2016 (Singapore)- 29 September 2016 (Malaysia)Marcus Goh is a Singapore television scriptwriter. He’s also a Transformers enthusiast and avid pop culture scholar. He Tweets/Instagrams at Optimarcus and writes at marcusgohmarcusgoh.com. The views expressed are his own.

  • Review: 'The Girl with All the Gifts' is a thinking man's zombie film
    News
    Marcus Goh

    Review: 'The Girl with All the Gifts' is a thinking man's zombie film

    Secret ending? No.Running time: 111 minutes (~2 hours)‘The Girl with All the Gifts’ is a zombie apocalypse film in a world where humanity has been reduced to small, isolated colonies, experimenting on sentient child zombies. When one of the test subjects might be the key to a cure to the zombie outbreak, a small group must escort the child to safety. It stars Gemma Arteron (Helen Justineau), Sennia Nanua (Melanie), Glenn Close (Dr Caroline Caldwell), Paddy Considine (Sergeant Eddie Parks), Anamaria Marinca (Dr Selkirk), Dominique Tipper (Devani), and Fisayo Akinade (Private Kieran Gallagher). It is rated NC-16.The zombie girl, Melanie (Sennia Nanua) in 'The Girl with All the Gifts’ might not seem like a plausible threat (what could a little zombie girl do) but the film does an excellent job of humanising her while exposing us to her ferocity, creating a duality in how we see her. Don’t be fooled by the seeming talkiness of the trailers — this is a true zombie film, albeit a thinking man’s zombie film.HighlightsSennia Nanua’s nuanced performanceIn an impressive display of dramaturgy, Sennia Nanua imbues Melanie with internal conflict that is neither over the top nor over-explained. The warring impulses between her zombie desires and human emotions is both heartwarming and terrifying to see. It’s not as straightforward as hoping that her humanity triumphs over her infection, because as the film reveals, that are aspects to her zombie-ness that also garner our empathy.A story of morality and survivalThe film also starts out with obvious antagonists and protagonists, making it seem like a clear cut battle between good and evil. However, it soon transitions into a story about survival, and not in the traditional fashion either. It’s a surprising twist that changes the conflict of ethics into one about the species, making us re-examine preceding events with a different lens.Surprisingly creepy scenesMelanie can be rather frightening when circumstances call for it, but the most horrifying part is how close the protagonists get to the zombies. The events of the film force the characters to get up and close personal with the zombies in a non-combat way, resulting in nerve-wracking scenes that don’t involve beating up zombies.LetdownsFlat supporting charactersBesides Dr Caldwell (Glenn Close), the rest of the characters lack dimension. They have one motivation, one characteristic, and perform the same schtick throughout the film. While Melanie and Dr Caldwell’s interactions provide the insightful elements, the other characters are just there for plot functions rather than good storytelling. You don’t really care about their fate.Sustainability of the ending doesn’t make senseWhile the sequence of events that leads to the climax is believable and logical, the situation which the characters find themselves in at the end of the film isn’t. The problem is that it’s impossible for them to continue for long with the arrangement that ensues in the ending, and before the film ends you can see how it will definitely end in disaster.'The Girl with All the Gifts’ is one zombie film that’s genuinely insightful and thought-provoking, rather than just claiming to be so.Should you watch this at weekday movie ticket prices? Yes.Should you watch this at weekend movie ticket prices? If you like zombie films.Score: 3.5/5'The Girl with All the Gifts’ opens in cinemas:- 29 September 2016 (Singapore)- 17 November 2016 (Malaysia)- 26 October 2016 (Philippines)Marcus Goh is a Singapore television scriptwriter. He’s also a Transformers enthusiast and avid pop culture scholar. He Tweets/Instagrams at Optimarcus and writes at marcusgohmarcusgoh.com. The views expressed are his own.

  • 5 classic stereotypes in all zombie movies like ‘Train to Busan’
    News
    Marcus Goh

    5 classic stereotypes in all zombie movies like ‘Train to Busan’

    If you haven’t caught “Train to Busan” (seriously, why haven’t you?), you would be still be able to guess what sort of roles the main characters will take up in the film. This is because all zombie films have the same set of character archetypes, though they may come in different shapes and forms. Once you recognise these stereotypes, you’ll never watch a zombie movie the same way again.

  • Review: 'Train to Busan' is as much about character development as it is about zombies
    News
    Marcus Goh

    Review: 'Train to Busan' is as much about character development as it is about zombies

    “Train to Busan” is a Korean apocalyptic zombie thriller about a group of survivors who find themselves in a zombie apocalypse. It stars Gong Yoo (Seok-woo), Kim Su-an (Su-an), Jung Yu-mi (Seong-kyeong), Ma Dong-seok (Sang-hwa), Choi Woo-shik (Young-guk), Ahn So-hee (Jin-hee), Kim Eui-sung (Yong-suk). Plus it’s not as if Korea is famous for its vast library of zombie films.

  • Review: An interesting premise isn't enough to save 'The ReZort'
    News
    Marcus Goh

    Review: An interesting premise isn't enough to save 'The ReZort'

    “The ReZort” (also known as “Generation Z”) is a zombie apocalyptic thriller about a resort that keeps zombies to entertain guests. It stars Jessica De Gouw (Melanie), Dougray Scott (Archer), Martin McCann (Lewis), Jassa Ahluwalia (Jack), Elen Rhys (Sadie), and Claire Goose (Wilton). “The ReZort” was a promising film that felt like it could have changed the zombie genre, or at least inject a spark of originality into such films.

  • Could Movie Apocalypses Happen In Real Life?
    News
    Ben Falk

    Could Movie Apocalypses Happen In Real Life?

    “Although the annual probability of a human being killed from an extra-terrestrial impactor is estimated to be about one in a million, if a very large one were to collide with Earth then this is probably the most-likely candidate for a global-changing event,” says Dr. Faure Walker, from the Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction at University College London.

  • Review: 'Pride and Prejudice and Zombies' is a teen idol comedy for literature fans
    News
    Marcus Goh

    Review: 'Pride and Prejudice and Zombies' is a teen idol comedy for literature fans

    Marcus Goh is a Singapore television scriptwriter. “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies” is an American period comedy, despite its British setting, based on the novel of the same title. It stars Lily James (Elizabeth Bennet), Sam Riley (Mr Darcy), Jack Huston (Mr Wickham), Bella Heathcote (Jane Bennet), Douglas Booth (Mr Bingley), Matt Smith (Mr Collins), Charles Dance (Mr Bennet), Lena Headey (Lady Catherine), Suki Waterhouse (Catherine Bennet), and Emma Greenwell (Caroline Bingley).

  • 5 ways Fear The Walking Dead differs from The Walking Dead
    News
    Geek Crusade - All your fandom news by fans.

    5 ways Fear The Walking Dead differs from The Walking Dead

    So the first 3 episodes of Fear The Walking Dead, a spin off of The Walking Dead are out, and it’s pretty damn awesome (see our review for the pilot). Concrete Jungle (Source: AMC) Unlike the lush woods of Atlanta, Fear the Walking Dead is set in concrete jungle of Los Angeles. The urban setting of FTWD, with no woods, an extremely dense population and lots of cars brings more story telling possibilities in a zombie apocalypse.  As discussed in our Zombie Survival School course, urban survival is a whole different ball game.

  • Hilarious Red-Band Scouts Guide To The Zombie Apocalypse Trailer
    News
    Ben Bussey

    Hilarious Red-Band Scouts Guide To The Zombie Apocalypse Trailer

    After giving us ‘Paranormal Activity’ movies pretty much every Halloween for the past five years or so, Paramount Pictures have something a little different up their sleeves for this trick-or-treat season, and it looks like it could quite a lot of fun - and definitely not one for younger viewers. Directed by Christopher Landon (marking a rather marked shift in tone for the filmmaker behind ’Paranormal Activity: the Marked Ones’), ‘Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse’ - originally entitled simply ‘Scouts Vs Zombies’ - pits a largely unknown young cast against the walking dead.