• 50 January sale purchases with at least 50% off
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    Sabrina Carder

    50 January sale purchases with at least 50% off

    With many high street stores offering up to 70% off, now's the time to shop a beauty, fashion, home or electrical deal.

  • Japan to introduce unmanned AI convenience store in spring 2020
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    Yahoo Lifestyle SEA

    Japan to introduce unmanned AI convenience store in spring 2020

    Customers just pop their shopping into their bags at the unmanned store and enter and pay using their transport card.

  • Here’s hoping for more sex-tech gadgets at CES 2020
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    Ng Chong Seng

    Here’s hoping for more sex-tech gadgets at CES 2020

    It’s almost January, which means the tech press will once again be gathering in Las Vegas for the annual CES trade show, where companies present their newest wares for the year and technology breakthroughs that may never make their way into a shipping product.

  • Too Many Streamers, Too Many Shows: How Minnow App Hopes to Solve the Discoverability Problem
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    The Wrap

    Too Many Streamers, Too Many Shows: How Minnow App Hopes to Solve the Discoverability Problem

    Whether you’re Netflix, Hulu or Amazon Prime, one of the primary challenges for streamers is creating a platform that makes it easy for subscribers to find and discover content — and then make sure they stay there. But the discovery problem is about to get even worse as every conglomerate in town is getting in on the streaming wars with their own services. And if you’re the average consumer, how do you avoid spending hours on the couch trying to decide on a movie or track down exactly what you want to watch? How do you avoid the paradox of choice that inevitably ends with watching just another episode of “Friends?” With the launch of Disney+ and Apple TV+ last month and HBO Max and Peacock soon on the horizon, a need is emerging in the marketplace for a way to universally search everything that’s out there and make it easy to cut through the clutter and help people more easily discover the content they want. Also Read: What's a Storyworld? The Future of Content Development That’s where Minnow comes in. The new app that launched last month is designed to solve the discovery problem through the ability to create...Read original story Too Many Streamers, Too Many Shows: How Minnow App Hopes to Solve the Discoverability Problem At TheWrap

  • Black Friday tech deals 2019:  Best TV, laptop, camera and headphone discounts
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    Sabrina Carder

    Black Friday tech deals 2019: Best TV, laptop, camera and headphone discounts

    From iPhones to 4K TV's - these are the tech deals to snap up ASAP.

  • UK drops plans for online pornography age verification system
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    The Guardian

    UK drops plans for online pornography age verification system

    Climbdown follows difficulties with implementing plan to ensure users are over 18. Plans to introduce a nationwide age verification system for online pornography have been abandoned by the government after years of technical troubles and concerns from privacy campaigners. The climbdown follows countless difficulties with implementing the policy, which would have required all pornography websites to ensure users were over 18. Methods would have included checking credit cards or allowing people to buy a “porn pass” age verification document from a newsagent. Websites that refused to comply with the policy – one of the first of its kind in the world – faced being blocked by internet service providers or having their access to payment services restricted. The culture secretary, Nicky Morgan, told parliament the policy would be abandoned. Instead, the government would instead focus on measures to protect children in the much broader online h arms w hite p aper. This is expected to introduce a new internet regulator, which will impose a duty of care on all websites and social media outlets – not just pornography sites. She said: “This course of action will give the regulator discretion on the most effective means for companies to meet their duty of care.” Despite abandoning the proposals, Morgan said the government remained open to using age verification tools in future, saying: “The government’s commitment to protecting children online is unwavering. Adult content is too easily accessed online and more needs to be done to protect children from harm.” The decision will disappoint a number of British businesses that had invested substantial time and money developing verification products. They had been hoping to capitalise on the large amount of Britons expected to verify their age in order to view legal pornography. One age verification provider estimated the potential market was as many as 25 million people. Although the age verification policy was first proposed by the Conservatives during the 2015 general election, it took years to develop and make it into law. Its implementation date was then repeatedly delayed amid difficulties with implementing the policy. The British Board of Film Classification was tasked with overseeing the system, which would be run and funded by private companies, despite the organisation’s lack of historical expertise in the world of technical internet regulation. Some of the age verification sites had close links to existing pornography providers. Concerns over the system grew as the public became increasingly aware of the approaching implementation date. Despite repeated reassurances from pornography websites and age verification sites that personal details would be kept separate from information about what users had watched, privacy campaigners continued to raise concerns about data security. In addition, earlier this year the Guardian showed how one age verification system could be sidestepped in minutes. Proponents of the policy privately accepted it would not block a persistent teenager from accessing adult material but said it could stop younger children from stumbling across images they found deeply disturbing. The policy had the backing of charities such as the NSPCC that were concerned about the impact of pornography on children. The final blow to the porn block came from an unlikely source: the European Union. Just weeks before the policy was due to be finally implemented in July, the government realised it had failed to inform the EU of its plans. This administrative error was initially announced as requiring a six-month delay – but Morgan’s announcement, made on a day when media attention was focused on the Brexit negotiations, means the age verification system has now been abandoned in its current form.

  • Google Pixel 4: Release date, price, specs and rumours so far
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    The Telegraph

    Google Pixel 4: Release date, price, specs and rumours so far

    Google's Pixel smartphone launches never used to elicit the awestruck reactions of say Apple's iPhone reveals, but gradually the Android phone maker has solidified its place among premier phone designs and garnered a following of fans.

  • Bang & Olufsen's 77'' Beovision Harmony
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    Yahoo Lifestyle SG videos

    Bang & Olufsen's 77'' Beovision Harmony

    It's set to blur the lines between art and tech.

  • Apple iPhone 11, 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max to retail at S$1,149, S$1,649 and S$1,799 respectively
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    Staff Writer, Singapore

    Apple iPhone 11, 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max to retail at S$1,149, S$1,649 and S$1,799 respectively

    SINGAPORE — Apple has announced that the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max will be available starting at S$1,149, S$1,649 and S$1,799.

  • All the memes from the Huawei $54 phone fiasco
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    Teng Yong Ping

    All the memes from the Huawei $54 phone fiasco

    Here are some memes about this embarrassing episode of “Kiasu Singaporeans queueing for things”.