• Anderson Cooper's Ex Benjamin Maisani Will Be A Co-Parent To Son Wyatt
    Celebrity
    HuffPost

    Anderson Cooper's Ex Benjamin Maisani Will Be A Co-Parent To Son Wyatt

    "He's my family and I want him to be Wyatt's family," the CNN anchor said of Maisani. The two men split in 2018 after nine years together.

  • All NYC Late-Night Shows to Tape Without Live Studio Audiences Amid Coronavirus Pandemic
    Entertainment
    The Wrap

    All NYC Late-Night Shows to Tape Without Live Studio Audiences Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

    New York City’s late-night TV shows are going without live studio audiences as coronavirus continues to spread. That means “Full Frontal With Samantha Bee,” “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon,” “Late Night With Seth Meyers,” “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert,” Trevor Noah’s “Daily Show” and “Last Week Tonight With John Oliver” will forego an in-house crowd.While Bee’s show is cutting its audience beginning with tonight’s taping and Oliver’s with this Sunday’s, all the other programs listed above will put that policy into effect next Monday.“The Late Show” will tape in front of an audience tonight and tomorrow night and a repeat was previously scheduled for Friday, an individual with knowledge tells TheWrap. Fallon and Meyers’ programs will also tape in front of live audiences tonight and Thursday, and do not record shows on Fridays.An individual with knowledge of NBC’s “Saturday Night Live,” which doesn’t return with a new episode until March 28, told TheWrap that producers are monitoring the situation closely in partnership with NYC and health officials and that a decision will be made about how to proceed as “SNL” gets closer to going back into production.Also Read: 'The View,' 'Live With Kelly and Ryan' and 'Good Morning America' to Tape Without Audiences Due to CoronavirusOn the West Coast, “Conan” is currently in reruns and on a scheduled hiatus for the next two weeks.A person with knowledge of ABC’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” told TheWrap that for now the tapings will continue as always, with a studio audience. A separate person with information on the plans for CBS’ “Late Late Show With James Corden” told TheWrap that one will also remain status quo. It’s also business as usual for Comedy Central’s “Lights Out With David Spade,” an insider tells TheWrap. All three of those shows tape in Los Angeles and their plans are subject to change.Representatives for HBO’s “Real Time With Bill Maher,” also an L.A-based late-night series, did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s requests for comment.Also Read: 'Survivor' Delays Production on Season 41 Amid Coronavirus Pandemic“Due to growing fears over COVID-19, and out of an abundance of caution, ‘Full Frontal with Samantha Bee’ will tape tonight’s episode without a live studio audience,” a spokesperson for the show told TheWrap Wednesday. “Bee says she will instead ‘do the show in front of a mirror, which I actually prefer. Despite the efforts being taken, we still have heard from Sean Spicer that tonight’s taping ‘was the largest audience ever to witness an [taping of Full Frontal], period, both in person and around the globe.’ Wow!”An NBC spokesperson said in their own statement: “The safety of our guests and employees is our top priority. As a precautionary measure, starting Monday, March 16, we have decided to suspend live audiences for ‘The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon’ and ‘Late Night with Seth Meyers.’ Per guidance from New York City officials, the company is hoping to do its part to help to decrease the rate of transmission in our communities. Our shows will continue filming on their regular schedule, and currently, there will be no impact on air dates.”In another statement, a CBS representative said: “Beginning Monday, March 16, ‘The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” will film without a live, in-studio audience. This move is being made out of an abundance of caution regarding the spread of the COVID-19 virus and the uncertainty of the situation for future weeks. Per guidance from New York City officials, CBS and ‘The Late Show’ are doing their part to help decrease the potential rate of transmission in our communities. There have not been any specific developments at The Ed Sullivan Theater to cause concern for audiences with plans to attend the show tonight, tomorrow, or who have attended in recent weeks. For several weeks, the team at the theater has been taking all necessary precautions to protect everyone who enters and works in the theater with enhanced cleaning and sanitizing procedures. For the past several weeks, ‘The Late Show’ producers have consulted daily to share information with other New York-based late night shows, who will also be moving forward without an audience.”Also Read: Crew Member on Fox's 'NeXT' Tests Positive for Coronavirus After Production Wraps in Chicago“Our top priority is the safety of our guests and staff. Beginning Monday, March 16th, Comedy Central’s NY based late night series, ‘The Daily Show with Trevor Noah,’ will film without a live, in-studio audience,” a Comedy Central spokesperson said. “This move is being made out of an abundance of caution and concern regarding the spread of the COVID-19 virus and per guidance from New York City officials to take appropriate actions. There have been no developments at ‘The Daily Show’s’ studio to cause concern for audience members who have plans to attend the show tonight or tomorrow. Measures have been taken to protect everyone who enters and works in the office and studio with enhanced cleaning and sanitizing procedures. For the past several weeks, ‘The Daily Show’ producers have communicated daily with other New York-based late night shows, who will also be moving forward without an audience beginning Monday.”HBO added: “As of this coming Sunday, March 15, ‘Last Week Tonight With John Oliver’ will film without a live, in-studio audience. We are taking this precaution in accordance with best practices as outlined by New York City officials. We will continue to monitor the situation.”These NYC-based late-night shows are far from the first programs with a live audience to cut that component from their program amid increasing concerns about COVID-19, which the CDC declared a pandemic on Wednesday.Earlier today, Walt Disney Television announced it was suspending live audiences from attending all of its NYC-based news broadcasts and talk shows, including “The View,” “Live With Kelly and Ryan,” “Good Morning America,” “Strahan, Sara and Keke” and “Tamron Hall.”Other programs that have cut their live audiences include “The Wendy Williams Show,” “Jeopardy!” and “Wheel of Fortune.”A number of public events have been called off in recent days as the number of coronavirus cases continues to rise in the U.S., with some health experts advising against public gatherings where the disease may be spread from person to person.One of the first and biggest events to be affected by the coronavirus threat was the now-canceled South by Southwest festival in Austin, which was originally scheduled to take place next week. Several other public events have been canceled or postponed — including political rallies, some TV networks’ upfront presentations, the Los Angeles Times’ annual Festival of Books, World of Wonder’s RuPaul’s DragCon and, potentially, the Coachella and Stagecoach music festivals.Read original story All NYC Late-Night Shows to Tape Without Live Studio Audiences Amid Coronavirus Pandemic At TheWrap

  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus Looks Back on Her ‘Miserable’ Time at ‘SNL’ in the 1980s: ‘I Was Unbelievably Naive’
    Entertainment
    The Wrap

    Julia Louis-Dreyfus Looks Back on Her ‘Miserable’ Time at ‘SNL’ in the 1980s: ‘I Was Unbelievably Naive’

    In a candid and frequently hilarious chat with Stephen Colbert on Saturday, Julia Louis-Dreyfus reflected on her “miserable” time as a “Saturday Night Live” cast member, and how the experience taught her to make sure she always enjoyed every future job.Speaking to Colbert as part of a benefit for Montclair Film at Newark’s New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Louis-Dreyfus explained how unprepared she was when she joined the show in the mid 1980s at the age of 21, not even finishing her studies at Northwestern University before heading off to New York.“I was unbelievably naive and I didn’t really understand how the dynamics of the place worked,” she told Colbert. “It was very sexist — very sexist. People were doing crazy drugs at the time. I was oblivious. I just thought, ‘Oh, wow! He’s got a lot of energy!'”Also Read: 'SNL': Will Ferrell's Gordon Sondland Shows Up to Ruin Things for Alec Baldwin's Trump (Video)She and Colbert then joked for a second that they couldn’t understand how anyone could ever perform inebriated, just before taking big sips from their cocktails.Louis-Dreyfus, who went on to decades-long TV success with shows like “Seinfeld,” “The New Adventures of Old Christine” and “Veep,” explained that her time on “SNL” led her to develop a system that helped her choose her future projects.“It was a pretty brutal time, but it was a very informative time for me,” she told Colbert. She said she realized then she wouldn’t do “anymore of this crap” unless “it was fun.”Also Read: 'SNL' Spoofs Democratic Debate With All-Star Lineup of Will Ferrell, Maya Rudolph, Woody Harrelson and More (Video)“It is important and so basic, but I just felt like, ‘I don’t have to; I don’t have to do this, I don’t have to walk and crawl through this kind of nasty glass if it’s not ultimately going to be fulfilling,” she said. “And so that’s how I sort of moved forward from that moment and I sort of applied that kind of ‘fun meter’ to every job I’ve had since and it definitely has been very helpful.”There was another benefit to the actress’ time on “SNL”: She met and bonded with Larry David, who would eventually put her in “Seinfeld.”“Larry David and I had been on ‘SNL’ together my last year there because he was a writer, and we bonded because he was as miserable as I was,” she revealed, earning a laugh from the crowd.Representatives for NBC did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Read original story Julia Louis-Dreyfus Looks Back on Her ‘Miserable’ Time at ‘SNL’ in the 1980s: ‘I Was Unbelievably Naive’ At TheWrap

  • Daniel Craig Confirms 'No Time To Die' Is His Final James Bond Film
    Entertainment
    HuffPost

    Daniel Craig Confirms 'No Time To Die' Is His Final James Bond Film

    "It's done," Craig told "The Late Show" host Stephen Colbert.

  • Robert De Niro: 'I hope they impeach Trump'
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Movies UK

    Robert De Niro: 'I hope they impeach Trump'

    The actor revealed his feelings at a screening of his new movie 'The Irishman'.

  • John Oliver Reveals That Beyoncé-'The Lion King' Conspiracy Theory Is True
    Entertainment
    HuffPost

    John Oliver Reveals That Beyoncé-'The Lion King' Conspiracy Theory Is True

    The "Last Week Tonight" host confirmed speculation about a promo photo of the cast.

  • Anna Kendrick Called Obama an 'Asshole' When They Met
    Entertainment
    Esquire

    Anna Kendrick Called Obama an 'Asshole' When They Met

    They're cool though.

  • 'It's 2017 for f*** sake': Ewan McGregor addresses Beauty and the Beast gay character controversy
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Movies UK

    'It's 2017 for f*** sake': Ewan McGregor addresses Beauty and the Beast gay character controversy

    ‘Beauty and the Beast’ actor Ewan McGregor has addressed the so-called controversy concerning a “gay moment” in the upcoming Disney film involving Josh Gad’s character Le Fou. The Scotsman addressed the furore in as plain a way as possible, telling US talk-show host Stephen Colbert: “It’s 2017, for f*** sake.” Quite.