• Why Isn’t California a Bigger Coronavirus Hot Spot? State Still Has Fewer Cases Than New York
    News
    The Wrap

    Why Isn’t California a Bigger Coronavirus Hot Spot? State Still Has Fewer Cases Than New York

    California had 9,816 confirmed coronavirus cases, and 212 deaths, as of Thursday morning, according to the New York Times tracking service. In Los Angeles County, the total confirmed cases have totaled 3,518, according to the county’s Department of Public Health, while the number of deaths has reached 65.But public health experts wonder why the state — which recorded its first case of the novel coronavirus on Jan. 26 — has not seen as big a surge as hot spots like New York, which has reported 83,889 confirmed cases and 1,941 deaths as of Thursday — with 1,374 in New York City alone.California’s strict and early shutdowns of nonessential businesses and orders for residents to stay at home may have helped the state avoid an outbreak as severe as New York’s, but health experts told TheWrap that the worst is yet to come in California, and that big cities like Los Angeles still need to prepare for a potential onslaught of seriously ill patients in hospitals.“I want people to recognize that we’re going to see some things we don’t want to see. We’re going to see a lot more people sick and a lot more people die,” John Swartzberg, an infectious diseases and vaccinology specialist at the UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program, told TheWrap. “That’s going to happen no matter what we can do.”California COVID-19 Cases, Johns Hopkins researchAlso Read: CNN's Chris Cuomo Announces He Tested Positive for CoronavirusAs has been extensively reported, the data surrounding the number of coronavirus cases in the U.S. is flawed and imprecise, largely because not enough people are being tested. As of March 31, the California Department of Public Health reported the completion of 31,038 tests, with another 59,100 pending. That’s significantly less than the 220,880 New Yorkers who had been tested as of March 31, according to New York State’s public health department.Further, comparisons between states are flawed because of differences in population and population density. But in terms of the curve of infection, California appears to have made positive strides in reducing the severity of the outbreak, even though the numbers of cases and deaths have continued to increase significantly each day.“We are in a completely different place than the state of New York, and I hope we continue to be, but we won’t unless people continue practicing social distancing,” Gov. Gavin Newsom said during a Wednesday afternoon press conference.Also Read: California Gov. Gavin Newsom Orders All Residents Statewide to Stay at HomeStatisticaOne reason for that may be the early action on the part of state and local officials. On March 16, six counties in California’s Bay Area — San Francisco, Santa Clara, San Mateo, Marin, Contra Costa and Alameda — announced a “shelter in place” order and closed nonessential businesses, launching one of the strictest orders issued in the U.S. at the time. Three days later, Los Angeles followed suit with a “safer at home” order, hours before California’s governor issued a statewide “stay at home” order that will last indefinitely.George Rutherford, the head of UCSF’s Division of Infectious Disease and Global Epidemiology, said that “shelter in place” or “stay at home” orders are most effective when they’re put in place before there’s widespread transmission of a highly contagious disease. “All our indications are that this is working,” Rutherford said of California’s early and aggressive social distancing measures.There are, of course, other geographic or cultural factors that may have given California an advantage in its fight against COVID-19 compared to states like New York, public health experts told TheWrap.Some of the main factors influencing a region’s infection rate include the number of people, the average distance between people, the number of interactions people are having with one another, whether people are moving between centers of infection, when the virus arrived, public health interventions and the number of tests conducted, Robert Siegel, a microbiology and immunology professor at Stanford, said.Also Read: LA County Closes All Public Beaches, Trails and Piers Through April 19And in New York, certain lifestyle differences — such as the concentration of people living and working in small areas and the widespread use of the subway and other public transport systems — means that more people are interacting more closely with one another. “Even in grocery stores, because of the cost of real estate, their aisles are closer together. So they have a lot of interactions,” Siegel said.Neal Baer, an adjunct professor in UCLA’s Department of Community Health Sciences, said that Los Angeles’ “car culture,” together with the city’s “safer at home” order, could be another “critical reason” as to why Angelenos have not yet seen as high a number of cases. “That’s not to say that people don’t get exposed in Los Angeles, but maybe we’re less exposed,” Baer said. “Two weeks ago, we were already sheltering, and we were in our cars weeks before then.”Still, health experts said that maintaining aggressive social distancing measures — alongside increasing the number of tests, protective gear and medical equipment like ventilators and ICU beds in hospitals — will be key to reducing the severity of the coronavirus outbreak in California and, for that matter, any other state in the U.S.“If it’s not done uniformly across the country,” Rutherford said, “the virus is going to continue to get reintroduced into the places that have done the right thing, and our effort will be for naught.”And aggressive measures on a city, state and federal level, health experts cautioned, can’t end when the coronavirus pandemic seems to be waning, either.“People say that we couldn’t afford to, but we’ve somehow found the money to fund a standing army that’s the largest in the world. And the reason we’ve done that is because the population believes that we need to protect ourselves, not from a war that’s happening now, but from a war that might occur,” Swatzberg said. “We know there’s going to be recurrent pandemics. There always have been and there are going to be until our science is a lot better. Why haven’t we prepared for that?”Read original story Why Isn’t California a Bigger Coronavirus Hot Spot? State Still Has Fewer Cases Than New York At TheWrap

  • Super Bowl LIV: Kansas City Chiefs’ Most Famous Fans, From Paul Rudd to Melissa Etheridge (Photos)
    Entertainment
    The Wrap

    Super Bowl LIV: Kansas City Chiefs’ Most Famous Fans, From Paul Rudd to Melissa Etheridge (Photos)

    Super Bowl LIV (that’s 54, for some of you) is here and will see the San Francisco 49ers take on the reigning league MVP in Patrick Mahomes, the Legion of Zoom and the Kansas City Chiefs. It’s been 50 years since the red and yellow were in a Super Bowl game. Here are some of the famous faces that will be cheering them on along with all the drunk would be tailgaters (sorry Chiefs fans) when the team heads to Miami for the big game.Paul Rudd: It would seem irresponsible not to start this list with Paul Rudd, who is arguably the celebrity most know as a diehard fan of not only the Kansas City Chiefs, but the city’s baseball team the Royals as well. When the Royals clinched a playoff spot in 2014, Rudd, who grew up in Lenexa, Kan. and attended the University of Kansas, jokingly invited fans to a party at his mother’s house.Also Read: Will 49ers-Chiefs Stop the Super Bowl's 4-Year TV Ratings Slide?Rob Riggle: The funny man and former Marine grew up just outside Kansas City in Overland Park, Kan. and was also a fixture during the Royals recent two World Series campaigns. Riggle told a Chiefs team blog that he’s been waiting for the Chiefs to go to the Super Bowl his entire life.Also Read: Super Bowl Parties 2020: TheWrap's Ultimate Guide to the Hottest Invites in Miami (Updating)Jason Sudeikis: Though younger than Paul Rudd, Sudeikis went to the same high school in Kansas as the superhero actor. He was also a fixture at games during the Royals’ playoff runs and has been a staunch supporter of Kansas City, even wearing a t-shirt of a popular Irish pup in Kansas City’s historic Westport neighborhood in the above photo.Also Read: The Super Bowl Has Generated $3.6 Billion-Plus in Ad Revenue in the Past 10 YearsEric Stonestreet: The “Modern Family” actor grew up on livestock farm in Kansas City, Kan. (which is different from Kansas City, Mo). But if you question his love of Chiefs, just scroll through his Instagram to see photos of him in the locker room and video of him beating the drum during home games.Brad Pitt: If Paul Rudd is the actor most famously known to be a Chiefs fan, then Brad Pitt is simply the most famous Chiefs fan. While walking the red carpet at the 2020 SAG Awards, which happened to be the same day the Chiefs punched their ticket to the big game, fellow Chiefs fans tossed Pitt a hat to rock on the carpet.Melissa Etheridge: The country rock icon, from Leavenworth, Kan., is a longtime supporter of the red and yellow. She even sang the National Anthem ahead of the AFC Championship game last year agains the New England Patriots.Henry Cavill: The Kansas City Chiefs have a Superman, which is fitting, since the comic book character grew up just over the state line in Kansas. Cavill, however, is English from  Jersey in the Channel Islands. That however hasn’t stopped him from cheering on the Chiefs via his Instagram.Read original story Super Bowl LIV: Kansas City Chiefs’ Most Famous Fans, From Paul Rudd to Melissa Etheridge (Photos) At TheWrap

  • 'The Last Black Man In San Francisco' filmmakers would pass up a '$30m cheque' to stick with indie films
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Movies UK

    'The Last Black Man In San Francisco' filmmakers would pass up a '$30m cheque' to stick with indie films

    Joe Talbot and Jimmie Fails are in no rush to join the big budget world of movie making.

  • Dad says Alaska Airlines ditched his 13-year-old daughter during layover: 'I was shaking'
    Lifestyle
    Yahoo Life

    Dad says Alaska Airlines ditched his 13-year-old daughter during layover: 'I was shaking'

    Alaska Airlines is facing criticism after a North Carolina father says his 13-year-old daughter was left alone crying in a San Francisco airport.

  • Iceland to San Francisco: How to experience two wildly different locations in seven days
    Lifestyle
    Yahoo Style UK

    Iceland to San Francisco: How to experience two wildly different locations in seven days

    Different in a myriad of ways, yet both brimming with historical, geological and cultural must-sees. So how do you seamlessly experience both? Easily, actually.