• Netflix Acquires Bradley Cooper’s Leonard Bernstein Film
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    The Wrap

    Netflix Acquires Bradley Cooper’s Leonard Bernstein Film

    Netflix has acquired the worldwide rights to the Leonard Bernstein film that Bradley Cooper is set to direct, an individual with knowledge of the project told TheWrap.The untitled film was originally set at Paramount, but Netflix will now take over with Martin Scorsese and Todd Phillips set as producers. Steven Spielberg and Amblin Entertainment are still attached. Cooper will also produce via his Joint Effort banner as well as Kristie Macosko Krieger, Emma Tillinger Koskoff, Fred Berner and Amy Durning.Cooper also co-wrote the film and is set to star in the film that will be his directorial follow-up to his debut “A Star Is Born.”Also Read: Cate Blanchett in Talks to Star Opposite Bradley Cooper in Guillermo Del Toro's 'Nightmare Alley'“Spotlight” screenwriter Josh Singer co-wrote the script with Cooper. The film is not a biopic but spans decades and tells the story of Bernstein’s complex marriage and relationship with his wife Felicia Montealegre, a Chilean-born actress.Production is expected to begin on the Bernstein film early next year, and Netflix plans to give the movie a theatrical release as it has done with “The Irishman” and its other awards contenders.Cooper obtained the rights from the Bernstein estate and has been working closely with Bernstein’s children, Jamie, Alexander and Nina for the past two years.Also Read: Netflix Q4 Earnings: Will Disney+ Slow March Toward 160 Million Subscribers?“Bradley’s directorial debut was nothing short of brilliant and he quickly cemented himself as a serious filmmaker,” Scott Stuber, Netflix head of film, said in a statement. “His strong passion and clear vision for bringing to life the relationship between the iconic composer Leonard Bernstein and his wife Felicia Montealegre promises to do their lives justice as only this renowned filmmaking team can. We are honored to be working with the Bernsteins to share their family’s story with audiences everywhere.”Cooper will next team up with Guillermo del Toro and to star in his film “Nightmare Alley.” Cooper is represented by CAA.Deadline first reported the news of the acquisition.Read original story Netflix Acquires Bradley Cooper’s Leonard Bernstein Film At TheWrap

  • Barbara Broccoli doesn't rule out possibility that streaming platform could win James Bond rights
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    Tom Beasley

    Barbara Broccoli doesn't rule out possibility that streaming platform could win James Bond rights

    James Bond is one of the biggest movie franchises in the world, but could it be bound for streaming one day?

  • Oscars 2020: Biggest snubs and surprises from today's nominations
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    Tom Beasley

    Oscars 2020: Biggest snubs and surprises from today's nominations

    J-Lo didn't make the Oscars cut, and neither did Robert De Niro. But there will be some stars excited at unexpected Oscars success.

  • Trailer for Aaron Hernandez Docuseries Explores the Downfall of an Athlete Turned Killer
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    Entertainment Tonight

    Trailer for Aaron Hernandez Docuseries Explores the Downfall of an Athlete Turned Killer

    'Killer Inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez' debuts Jan. 15 on Netflix.

  • Gwyneth Paltrow defends wellness claims ahead of Goop Netflix show
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    Erin Donnelly

    Gwyneth Paltrow defends wellness claims ahead of Goop Netflix show

    "We made a few mistakes back in the early days," said Paltrow, who will explore "alternative ways of healing" in a new Netflix show,

  • 'Uncut Gems' directors reveal how the movie would've changed without Adam Sandler (exclusive)
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    Tom Beasley

    'Uncut Gems' directors reveal how the movie would've changed without Adam Sandler (exclusive)

    Adam Sandler wasn't always in place to play the lead role in the nail-biting Netflix thriller 'Uncut Gems'.

  • Golden Globes 2020: The biggest shocks, surprises and celebrations
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    Ethan Alter

    Golden Globes 2020: The biggest shocks, surprises and celebrations

    From Ellen DeGeneres, Michelle Williams and Brad Pitt to Joaquin Phoenix, Ricky Gervais and Quentin Tarantino, these are the most memorable moments of the 77th Golden Globes — for better or worse.

  • Martin Scorsese says streaming algorithms are ruining audiences
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    Gregory Wakeman

    Martin Scorsese says streaming algorithms are ruining audiences

    Martin Scorsese might have provoked the wrath of Netflix after criticising the impact of streaming algorithms

  • The most exciting movie releases of 2020
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    Tom Beasley

    The most exciting movie releases of 2020

    These are the movies we can't to see in UK cinemas and on the biggest streaming platforms.

  • The most popular Netflix releases in the UK for 2019
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    Amy Johnson

    The most popular Netflix releases in the UK for 2019

    The streaming site has revealed what UK viewers have been watching over the past 12 months.

  • Offices of Brazilian Production Team Behind Gay Jesus Netflix Comedy Firebombed
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    The Wrap

    Offices of Brazilian Production Team Behind Gay Jesus Netflix Comedy Firebombed

    The Rio de Janeiro offices of Porta dos Fundos, the Brazilian production company behind the satirical Netflix comedy “The First Temptation of Christ,” were firebombed on Christmas Eve in what appeared to be a right-wing terrorist attack.No one was injured in the attack, in which several molotov cocktails were hand-thrown at the offices of Porta dos Fundos (“Back Door”), known for other similarly biting comedies. “The First Temptation of Christ,” which debuted on Netflix Dec. 3, portrays Jesus returning home to his family for the holidays, and bringing with him what appears to be his same-sex partner.The film has been heavily criticized by religious-affiliated groups in Brazil and abroad who object to the film’s portrayal of Jesus. And in a video released after the attack, a group claiming credit cited similar objections, saying the attack was intended to “seek justice” for “all Brazilians against the blasphemous, bourgeois and anti-patriotic attitude” behind the film, the New York Times reports. The video calls Porta dos Fundos “militant Marxists,” and includes footage of the attack.Also Read: Hallmark Reverses Stance on LGBTQ Zola Ads Under Pressure, Looks to Reinstate ThemIn a statement posted on Twitter, Porta dos Fundos condemned “any act of violence” and said it has provided security camera images to law enforcement. The company said it will make a further statement when more information is available, adding “we anticipate that we will move on, more united, stronger, more inspired, and confident that the country will survive this storm of hatred and love will prevail along with freedom of speech.”“We have endured all types of verbal assaults, online, even from members of Congress,” Gregorio Duvivier, the actor who plays Jesus in the film and is a member of Porta dos Fundos (“Back Door) said in a statement after the attack. “But this is the first time we’ve faced violence of this nature, an attack that could have killed people.”The attacks come amid increasing political tension in Brazil as the country’s president, Jair Bolsonaro, has staked out hard-line positions on multiple hot button issues. Among others, these include vocal opposition to marriage equality and equal rights for LGBTQ Brazilians, and support for the military dictatorship that ruled Brazil from 1965-1985.Netflix has not yet publicly commented on the uproar over the special or the attack. The company did not immediately reply to a request for comment from TheWrap.Read original story Offices of Brazilian Production Team Behind Gay Jesus Netflix Comedy Firebombed At TheWrap

  • ‘The Witcher’ Star Anya Chalotra on Yennefer’s Transformation – and Its ‘Brutal’ Cost
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    The Wrap

    ‘The Witcher’ Star Anya Chalotra on Yennefer’s Transformation – and Its ‘Brutal’ Cost

    (Warning: This post contains spoilers for “The Witcher” Episodes 101-103.)Anya Chalotra’s Yennefer of Vengerberg is the bewitching sorceress who keeps Geralt of Rivia (Henry Cavill) on his toes throughout the first season of Netflix’s “The Witcher.” But as is revealed in her origin story in Episodes 2 and 3, the mage with the killer powers and killer body came from much more humble beginnings: she is a quarter-elf farm girl who is shamed for having a hunchback and deformed jaw and is sold off to Tissaia by her stepfather as a teen.And while she’s still the same Yennefer on the inside — for better or worse — Chalotra was playing two very different characters on the outside before her big transformation at the end of Episode, which turns her into the woman Geralt will eventually meet decades in the future. (Remember: The show is playing with timelines.)“This is the greatest acting change I’ve ever had,” Chalotra told TheWrap. “I’m in my twenties and I play from a 14-year-old girl to someone in their 70s and then their 80s, post-transformation. So before, I had the help of a back prosthetic and I had the jaw misalignment, so I had a mouthguard in my mouth. And all those things helped me and my movement. I was looking at the floor a lot. And I had a smaller voice when I spoke and I didn’t look anyone in the eye. And then after transformation, I had the help of costumes and a corset and I felt a lot stronger.”Also Read: 'Witcher' Showrunner, Henry Cavill Say Series Shouldn't Be Confusing to Those Who Didn't Read the BooksYennefer’s big change comes after she has been trained by Tissaia for years in the ways of sorcery and controlling chaos. But for the witch, the cost of that transformation — the inability to birth a child — isn’t known from the start, though she agrees to the sacrifice moments before the enchantment procedure when she’s told by the “artist” remaking her body that “to be reborn, you will bear no more.”He then rips her womb from her body and sets it aflame before straightening her back and jaw, turning her the beautiful sorceress she always wanted to be, all while she screams in agony.Chalotra calls Yennefer’s choice a “brutal” one that will begin to “haunt her” as the season goes on, even though she got what she wanted and managed to finagle her way into becoming the king of Aedirn’s mage over Fringilla.Also Read: Why Netflix Is Betting You'll Want 'The Witcher' Season 2 - Before You've Seen Season 1“She made a split-second decision, thinking about power and beauty and not realizing what it would mean to her later. And I think she’ll spend the rest of her days trying to find a way around what was taken.”“The Witcher” Season 1 is streaming now on Netflix.Read original story ‘The Witcher’ Star Anya Chalotra on Yennefer’s Transformation – and Its ‘Brutal’ Cost At TheWrap

  • Terry Gilliam Lets Loose on ‘Don Quixote,’ Trump, Harvey Weinstein, Marvel and More
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    The Wrap

    Terry Gilliam Lets Loose on ‘Don Quixote,’ Trump, Harvey Weinstein, Marvel and More

    “Welcome to my velvet prison,” Terry Gilliam said as he walked into the restaurant at the Four Seasons hotel in Beverly Hills. Casual in what appeared to be a robe of some sort, the filmmaker, animator and Monty Python member was in Los Angeles for a few days, ostensibly to whip up some awards attention for “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” the freewheeling riff on Cervantes that had been almost three decades in the making before he finally made it with Adam Driver and Jonathan Pryce.But at the age of 79, Gilliam isn’t the kind of guy to stick to one subject – not when it’s the 50th anniversary of Python, not when he has a history of misadventures on screen and off with the likes of “Brazil,” “The Adventures of Baron Munchausen,” “The Fisher King,” “The Imaginariuym of Doctor Parnassus” and others, and not when there’s Brexit, Boris Johnson, Donald Trump, Netflix, Harvey Weinstein and the rise of the comedy police to talk about.So what brings you to Los Angeles? I don’t know. It’s a strange moment. My daughter, Amy, was one of the producers of “Quixote,” and she said, “This is crazy. It’s awards season, and we don’t exist.” Everybody’s talking about the 10 million Adam Driver films that have come out, and “Quixote” doesn’t exist because we had probably the worst distribution I’ve ever experienced in my life.So Amy talked to our fairy godmother, the lady who made the film possible — she’d come in at the last moment and given us the money we couldn’t get for years. And she said, “Let’s get Terry out here and do some things and get some press.”I don’t know what it means, because we’re not going to be nominated for anything. But we do actually have the Academy streaming the film, which is good. It’s slightly odd, but I just didn’t want the film to just disappear because it’s a really good film. And I think it’s Adam’s best performance this year, personally.Also Read: 'The Man Who Killed Don Quixote' Film Review: Terry Gilliam Finally Delivers Messy FunIn a way, I suppose it’s only fitting that even after you finished the damn thing, it’s still a struggle. It’s a perfect “Quixote” story. “Quixote” is always about the nightmare of thinking you’ve achieved something, and then bang, you’re down on the floor again.When you got to the end of it, was there a feeling of, “Oh s—, I finished this. What now?” Not really. (Pause) Well, there is the “What now?” question. Because I don’t have a f—ing clue what now. When you finish a film there’s always this postnatal depression that goes on for me [for] six months, but always there was “Quixote” waiting in the wings, saying, “Come on, come back and see if we can make this thing.” And now I don’t have anything.I’m playing with a few things, but I just don’t know. It’s the first time in my life I felt this. Maybe I have burned myself out. I’m reading like mad trying to get something that kicks me into belief again. Maybe the problem is getting old. You get weary. My life and my filmmaking has been about fights, and now there’s nobody attacking me. (Laughs)We’ll see what’s going. I’m working with Richard LaGravenese on an old script that we had years ago, trying to see if we can update it and make it work. We thought, well, maybe we can extend this and make a six-part TV series. Because the money is sitting there at Netflix and all the other streamers. But when you see Marty (Scorsese) doing what he does, the Coen brothers doing it, I’m not sure if Netflix is going to have any money left by the time I get there.Also Read: Terry Gilliam Feels a 'Huge Emptiness' Waiting for Him Now That 'Don Quixote' Is Finally FinishedSo that’s the likely course rather than theatrical? Independent distribution is really f—ed. They don’t have any money anymore. And how do you compete with “Avengers” and things like that? It’s only at this time of year when you get a sense that there are independent films out there, because they’re spending all their money for the awards.There must have been a point in your career when Hollywood would have given you “Avengers”-style movies. When I was younger, I would’ve loved to have done that kind of work. But not now. There’s so many good technical directors out there. I don’t know their names – nobody knows their names – but boy, they can do the job. And even fairly recently, somebody was talking to me about one of the big things. But I just don’t want to work on that kind of movie, because they’re basically factory systems. And why?The one person I admire at the moment is Taika Waititi. A couple of years ago at Christmas, my son put on “Thor: Ragnarok.” I said, “I don’t want to see this stuff,” but it was really funny. And I think “Jojo Rabbit” is wonderful, just fantastic.He’s facing questions like, “Should you really joke about Nazis today?” Exactly. You can’t joke about anything these days. You might cause offense, and offense is a crime against humanity and must be stopped. You might make somebody think, and that’s really dangerous.That’s why “Jojo Rabbit” is such a brilliant film, because he deals with Nazis and his touch is perfect. I never laughed as hard as I did in “Jojo Rabbit,” with the German version of “I Want to Hold Your Hand.” But his balance was so beautiful and the story is wonderful.I don’t know where we are these days. The problem is that our politicians in America and now Britain are so beyond satire. They’re the joke, but it’s not laughable. Boris Johnson and Donald Trump are the clowns, but they’re not funny. They’re the other side of clowning, the dark side.Also Read: Taika Waititi Says He Didn't Even Try to Pitch Studios on His WWII Comedy 'Jojo Rabbit'You left the United States, where you were born and raised, to go to Britain in the 1960s? ’67. I was fed up with America. I was angry because there was a war going on and the civil rights movement was in full flow and friends were getting seriously hurt. When you’re raised here, you begin to believe that America stands for truth, justice and all of those things. And it was a moment of looking around saying, “This is not the place I thought it was. I want out because I am angry, and when I’m angry I’m not much fun to be around.”Did it make you less angry to be over there? Yeah. I suppose that I realized for all the faults in the country, they weren’t my fault, because I wasn’t born there. Getting to England just took the weight off my shoulders, and I loved the culture there.I went there because I believed in what I thought the country stood for — a liberal attitude, an intelligent, liberal, embrace of everybody. And it’s now become bitter, racist, hating immigrants. It’s horrible. They’ve become as ideologically confused as Americans, and the big lie seems to work. We’re out of Europe. It is a f—ing little island that doesn’t make anything anymore, and I don’t know how it’s going to survive.When you’re thinking about what to do next, are you thinking about projects that would reflect what you see in the world? Yeah. But the problem is that it’s so hard to work out how you satirize this stuff, because it is already satirical in the worst possible way. I mean, everything I’ve done to me is relating to the world we live in in some way. And I’m finding it so hard at the moment to find a way of doing it that’s still funny. I’m just not laughing anymore.When they did the 40th anniversary re-release of “Monty Python’s Life of Brian” early this year, it could not have been much timelier. It’s totally prescient, that film. It’s prescient and it’s funny and it’s honest. But a year or so ago, the new head of comedy at the BBC made this big public statement that Monty Python would never be commissioned now, because it was six white guys. ‘Cause they’re into diversity now, not comedy. Well, I was diverse. I was an American, I wasn’t British. Graham Chapman was gay. So we were pretty diverse. Some studied English history, others weren’t into law. What more do you want? (Laughs)When I was promoting “Quixote,” I was asked my feelings about that in a press conference in Germany. And I said, “Well, as a white male, I’m really tired of being blamed for all the wrongs on the planet. From now on, I want you to call me Loretta. I’m a black lesbian in transition.”I got a laugh, of course. But the British liberal press has tried to be so much like the Hollywood press, and Hollywood is just crazed now. It’s like a little village where at any moment there’s only one way to think about things. And so I was pilloried for causing harm to people by what I said. Harm. They don’t even know what the word harm means anymore. I ruffled somebody’s feathers? That’s harm?And “I want you to call me Loretta” is, after all, a quote that Eric Idle’s character says in a scene from “Life of Brian” that’s all about the rise of extreme political correctness. The common good is not important anymore. It’s “me” and “I feel” and “you must never say anything critical of me or my behavior,” because that’s offending.I sound like some old right winger, I know. After I made that statement in Germany, I did an interview with a really good journalist who said, “Many of the things you say sound very similar to what the neo-Nazis say.” I’m 180 degrees the opposite of them. And I said, “Whatever you write, please write this: When we can’t distinguish between humor and hatred, we are f—ed.”Python must have gotten plenty of people saying, “Oh, you shouldn’t joke about that.” No, we didn’t. I did an interview for the 50th anniversary, and Python used to always refer to “fat, ignorant bastards.” And they were worried about the offense we were causing by saying that. I said, “They were fat, ignorant bastards – that wasn’t offensive, it was just a statement of fact.” (Laughs)You can’t be critical. You can’t say anything that’s humorous, critical, questioning, because somebody will be offended. I got an award once for an opera, and I talked about the fact that I didn’t want the lead singer to be just some 50-year-old fat woman. And there was so much shock over me saying fat woman that I had to backtrack and explain what I really meant: There are fat women who sing, and if they’re supposed to be playing a 16-year-old Juliet, give me a break.So basically, you’ve been saying things that get you into trouble for years. Right. I think the problem of being of an advanced age is just you get dismissed as an old fart who doesn’t know the world. I know what’s going on and, but I do a lot of complaining because I can get away with it. I don’t give a s— what you think, which is not particularly helpful.So when you started the TV show in ’69 did you guys have any sense that what you were doing was significant? We were just doing what we want to do and getting away with it. Nothing more. We were just delighted that we had the opportunity to do what we wanted to do, and we had the BBC as an outlet. There were only three channels then, right? So everybody saw what you did. We went on on Sunday night, and on Monday morning everybody at work was around the water cooler talking about it. That doesn’t exist anymore because there’s so many choices.We just thought about each show as the end, to make it as funny as we could. We argued amongst ourselves, but the good thing about the group was there was a mutual respect in the work. Individually, we’d get in huge fights about each other, but we all felt that the work was the key thing. And when I look back, it’s incredibly rare to have your own television show where there’s no producer, no executives saying, “This is what you need to do. This is the audience we want you to go for it.”That’s why I do find it funny that we are 50 years on and we’re legendary now. (Laughs) We’re national treasures, whatever that means. Because I certainly don’t feel like that. I take the tube, Mike Palin takes the tube. And occasionally, maybe a couple of times a week, someone says, “Nice, Terry.”Coming to Hollywood, the pressure is to be a real star. It’s a killer. I’ve got friends, two who committed suicide here, and on every level they were successful here. But there was always more success they hadn’t attained, and that’s the pressure of it. Which I think is terrible.Did you ever feel yourself falling into that? Yeah, yeah. That’s why I don’t like LA. I stay away from it. I know it’s contagious. (Laughs) Coming here for a couple of days, that’s it.It was one of those weird things, having grown up out here, in the Valley, and wanting to be in film somehow. It seemed so distant. Physically it wasn’t distant, but then to go to England and finally come back to Hollywood and make movies in Hollywood was always odd and interesting and quite wonderful.I think that separation is really important. I talk to friends out here, and their limited view bothers me. It’s all about how you get something through this particular system. And now I think it’s really hard if you’re a talented to survive out here and to still continue to do really good work other than just producing products.I also think it’s hard now because you make a film and you want feedback. And feedback is also the number of people that are watching it and how it plays in a cinema. You don’t get that on Netflix. You don’t know who, what, anything.And yet they gave Martin Scorsese the money to make “The Irishman” when no studio would. Exactly. Exactly. But the question is, what is the ultimate effect of the movie now? We don’t know. At least with films, you know how many people went, you can see them so you’re getting feedback so you know if you’re communicating. And maybe at a certain point and a certain age, like me and Marty, we don’t care if we’re communicating any more – we just want to do the things we’ve wanted to do for years. We want to say we’re getting away with it.Do you find it appealing to think about the longer form you could use if you did go with Netflix? Well, that’s one of the things that Richard LeGravenese and I have been doing. We did a breakdown for a six-part series which looked like it could work, but I’m not convinced. What I tend to do with my repetitive nature is dance between reality and imagination. In a two-hour, two-hour-plus film, you’ve got the audience trapped, so you play that game in route. If you’re doing it on TV, I’m not sure it works the same way. When you get to the end of an episode, do you leave it in reality or do you leave it in the imaginative stage? And then you come back and pick it up from there? But it may be the only way that it will ever get done is if we do it for Netflix.But you don’t have a timeline for when you’re liable to do your next thing? No. I don’t know. I’m reading like mad waiting for the muse to come back. I think the problem is that I know how long it takes to get a film set up, and I’m kind of worn out. What I really would like if somebody who’s got a good script and they’ve got the funding and they’re looking for a director. Hi!I mean, in a sense that that’s what happened after “Munchhausen.” That was just a nightmare, and along came the script for “The Fisher King.” I didn’t write it, I didn’t care, it’s a great script. All we need to do is get Robin Williams, and I can get Robin. And we were off. It was the same thing with “The Brothers Grimm,” which was my experience with the Weinstein bothers. That was like, you just wanted to give up. But we did “Tideland,” which was low budget and fast.So I think that’s what I’m feeling. I will work on various things. I’m doing a musical for the theater. I had a period when I did two operas. These are the things that come along — they’re ready to go and I jump in because I’ve got to work. I know all the film ideas I’ve got are not going to be easy to finance, and I’m impatient. My theory is I’m going to die very soon, and I’d like to knock off one or two more.Your problems with the Weinsteins were over their tendency to interfere in the filmmaking? Yeah, yeah, yeah. Wanting to be directors. And they’re not. If you want to be a director, direct a movie. But they can’t. They’ve got to get their fingerprints all over the thing, so they can claim they did. They fired my DP and forced another DP on me. At a certain point the fun and the joy of filmmaking was destroyed.In their earlier stages, they were very good at picking up really good films and then saying to the filmmakers, “Your film is very good. It could be great, if … ” They would then get the filmmakers to compromise and do what they thought would make the film more popular and more successful. And then the films would fail, so they destroyed these young filmmakers. Really destroyed them. Once you’ve been through that experience, you’ve lost all confidence in yourself. And I know several who just gave up.The problem is, they’re smart, Harvey in particular. But in “Brothers Grimm,” Robin Williams was originally going to play the part that Peter Stormare played. They wouldn’t do a deal with Robin because they thought Robin had betrayed them on “Good Will Hunting.” Robin was the reason the film got made, and when the film looked like it might be worked for some awards, they wanted Robin to give up his back end to give them the money to campaign. And Robin said, “Why?” and he didn’t. So they refused to let me have Robin.I wanted Samantha Morton for the part that Lena Headey played. Samantha was perfect for the part, but Harvey would not do it. He said, “She’s brilliant, she’s going to win the Academy Award one day, but she’s not going to be in your film.” I talked to her and said, “What was your crime that they are behaving like this?” And the only thing she could think of was that when they were in Cannes promoting something, there was a lunch, and Harvey said, “Come to lunch. important people. I want you to wear a very short skirt.” And she came down in slacks. That was her crime. I think that was the only thing she could think of. He wanted her to look sexy and she said no.And eventually his karma caught up with him, and he’s in a real karma crash.Well, I think I’ve got plenty to work with… Enough to destroy my career? (Laughs) Thank you.Actually, you asked why I was here. I’m actually here to say things that get me into trouble when you print them.Read original story Terry Gilliam Lets Loose on ‘Don Quixote,’ Trump, Harvey Weinstein, Marvel and More At TheWrap

  • What’s Coming to Netflix in January 2020
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    Variety

    What’s Coming to Netflix in January 2020

    What better way to celebrate the New Year than by settling into the couch with a Netflix marathon? Get nostalgic about the early '00s with Hilary Duff in "A Cinderella Story," or get inspired to cook with Meryl Streep and Amy Adams in "Julie & Julia." Both titles are headed to the streaming service early […]

  • '6 Underground' star Ben Hardy responds to mixed reviews: 'Michael Bay is a Marmite filmmaker'
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    Tom Butler

    '6 Underground' star Ben Hardy responds to mixed reviews: 'Michael Bay is a Marmite filmmaker'

    Critics are "not the be all and end all of what makes a great movie" says Hardy.

  • REVIEW: Ronny Chieng’s Asian Comedian Destroys America is funny as h*ll
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    Reta Lee

    REVIEW: Ronny Chieng’s Asian Comedian Destroys America is funny as h*ll

    It would be a disservice to my fellow countrymen and women if I don’t share my thoughts about Malaysia-born, Singapore-raised Ronny Chieng’s debut of his Netflix show, Asian Comedian Destroys America. 

  • Mixed reviews for Michael Bay's '6 Underground' but they won't stop it being a hit for Netflix
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    Tom Butler

    Mixed reviews for Michael Bay's '6 Underground' but they won't stop it being a hit for Netflix

    Slotting into Netflix’s December slot, previously occupied by mega-hits 'Bird Box' and 'Bright', the film stars Ryan Reynolds.

  • Marvel TV to Cut Staff, End Future Development as Unit Moves Under Kevin Feige and Marvel Studios
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    The Wrap

    Marvel TV to Cut Staff, End Future Development as Unit Moves Under Kevin Feige and Marvel Studios

    Marvel TV is winding down. Two months after the division was moved under Kevin Feige and Marvel Studios, the TV-arm of Marvel is ending all of its development plans.Marvel TV will complete all of its projects that are currently in development, which include the final season of ABC’s “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” that will air next summer, but will not continue beyond that. Those also include the four animated series that are currently in development at Hulu, as well as the live-action “Helstrom.”The integration of Marvel TV under Marvel Studios will include layoffs as a result, both in the immediate future and long term, once development on all current Marvel TV shows is completed. The move effectively shutters the division as it will be absorbed by Marvel Studios — though the Marvel TV name may still continue.Also Read: Kevin Feige Named Chief Creative Officer of MarvelMarvel TV staff, including Karim Zreik, senior vice president of current programming and production and members of his team, will join the Marvel Studios group. Zreik will head up current projects in production. Jeph Loeb, who is exiting as head of Marvel TV in the coming weeks, will remain available during the transition. Marvel Studios is planning its own foray into the small screen with eight different shows for Disney+. Those include “The Falcon and The Winter Soldier,” “WandaVision,” “Loki” and “Hawkeye,” which all star characters from the hugely popular Marvel Cinematic Universe.Earlier this year, Marvel TV signed a large, multi-series animated deal with Hulu, and then a separate agreement with the Disney-owned streamer for a pair of live-action series in “Helstrom” and “Ghost Rider.” Plans for “Ghost Rider” were eventually shelved. The third and final season of “The Runaways” premieres on Hulu this Friday.Loeb spearheaded the initial expansion of the MCU into television with “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” and “Agent Carter.” Marvel TV had an expansive slate on Netflix that included “Daredevil,” “Jessica Jones,” “Iron Fist,” “Luke Cage,” “The Punisher” and the team-up series, “The Defenders.” But with Disney launching its own streaming competitor, the two sides ended their four-year creative partnership earlier this year.Read original story Marvel TV to Cut Staff, End Future Development as Unit Moves Under Kevin Feige and Marvel Studios At TheWrap

  • Golden Globes 2020 nominations: The biggest snubs and surprises
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    Golden Globes 2020 nominations: The biggest snubs and surprises

    'Marriage Story' shocks with most nominations and female filmmakers are completely overlooked. Meanwhile, Netflix and Apple notch streaming milestones.

  • Here’s how many people watched ‘The Irishman’ on Netflix
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    Here’s how many people watched ‘The Irishman’ on Netflix

    The viewing figures for The Irishman have been released, and the gangster epic proved to be a huge hit with Netflix subscribers.

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    The much anticipated Witcher series by Netflix will drop in December.

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    The Wrap

    Too Many Streamers, Too Many Shows: How Minnow App Hopes to Solve the Discoverability Problem

    Whether you’re Netflix, Hulu or Amazon Prime, one of the primary challenges for streamers is creating a platform that makes it easy for subscribers to find and discover content — and then make sure they stay there. But the discovery problem is about to get even worse as every conglomerate in town is getting in on the streaming wars with their own services. And if you’re the average consumer, how do you avoid spending hours on the couch trying to decide on a movie or track down exactly what you want to watch? How do you avoid the paradox of choice that inevitably ends with watching just another episode of “Friends?” With the launch of Disney+ and Apple TV+ last month and HBO Max and Peacock soon on the horizon, a need is emerging in the marketplace for a way to universally search everything that’s out there and make it easy to cut through the clutter and help people more easily discover the content they want. Also Read: What's a Storyworld? The Future of Content Development That’s where Minnow comes in. The new app that launched last month is designed to solve the discovery problem through the ability to create...Read original story Too Many Streamers, Too Many Shows: How Minnow App Hopes to Solve the Discoverability Problem At TheWrap

  • Martin Scorsese explains why 'The Irishman' wasn't made as a TV series
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    Gregory Wakeman

    Martin Scorsese explains why 'The Irishman' wasn't made as a TV series

    Martin Scorsese explains why The Irishman couldn't have been a television series.

  • 'The Irishman': The best way to watch the three and half hour gangster epic in bitesize chunks
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    Tom Beasley

    'The Irishman': The best way to watch the three and half hour gangster epic in bitesize chunks

    At three and a half hours long, watching 'The Irishman' on Netflix in one stint is a tough ask. Here's when it's safe to pause for a break.