• The best diets for long-term health, according to new study
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    Caroline Allen

    The best diets for long-term health, according to new study

    Six in ten people on the Med diet stuck to it for the whole year.

  • ‘Rebuilding Paradise’ Director Ron Howard About Why He’s Spoken Up About Climate Change (Video)
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    ‘Rebuilding Paradise’ Director Ron Howard About Why He’s Spoken Up About Climate Change (Video)

    Ron Howard said that making his new documentary “Rebuilding Paradise,” about the aftermath of the devastating 2018 Camp Fire in southern California, had emboldened him to speak out about climate change — even at the risk of severe blowback like he experienced on Twitter earlier this month.“As a citizen, you recognize the challenges out there and you can’t just leave it to others to engage,” Howard told TheWrap founder Sharon Waxman in Sundance on Friday.For one year, Howard and his film crews followed the residents of Paradise, Calif., in the Sierra Nevada foothills as they sought to recover from a wildfire that killed 85 people and destroyed 95% of the town.Also Read: Why Neon Is the Indie to Watch at Sundance After 'Parasite' and 'Honeyland'“One of the things I learned was that old adage, showing up is first and foremost in reinforcing the possibility of home,” he said. “People did take action from around their community. I’m not talk about protesting, I’m talking about trying to solve problems. It’s a lesson in getting things done, making things happen, making your voice heard.”He added, “There’s something very powerful about seeing the way the community came together.”The NatGeo production was produced by Howard, Brian Grazer, Xan Parker, Sara Bernstein and Justin Wilkes.Watch the video above.Read original story ‘Rebuilding Paradise’ Director Ron Howard About Why He’s Spoken Up About Climate Change (Video) At TheWrap

  • The 15 questions to check if your relationship will work, according to experts
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    Caroline Allen

    The 15 questions to check if your relationship will work, according to experts

    The 15 questions are backed by loads of research.

  • The most popular alibis for cheating partners revealed
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    Caroline Allen

    The most popular alibis for cheating partners revealed

    2,000 cheating men and women share their top excuses.

  • We should all walk during our lunch breaks, experts say
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    Caroline Allen

    We should all walk during our lunch breaks, experts say

    When it’s cold outside its easy for us to slip into a routine of eating lunch at or desks or staying in the warm.

  • ‘Ironbark': Benedict Cumberbatch’s Timely Cold War Drama Brings Thrills, Unexpected Laughs to Sundance
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    ‘Ironbark': Benedict Cumberbatch’s Timely Cold War Drama Brings Thrills, Unexpected Laughs to Sundance

    Introducing “Ironbark” on Friday night at Sundance 2020, festival President John Cooper said the Cold War drama starring Benedict Cumberbatch was a “unique” choice for the annual event, which has only rarely featured period dramas.Based on a true story most people have never heard of, the film from director Dominic Cooke tells the story of Greville Wynne (Cumberbatch), a British businessman recruited to travel to Moscow and acquire information about the Soviet Union’s missile plans from a Russian source, Oleg Penkovsky (Merab Ninidze). As tensions escalate into the Cuban Missile Crisis, they smuggle documents back to the west, with severe consequences for both men.Cumberbatch is currently shooting Jane Campion’s “The Power of the Dog” in New Zealand and wasn’t able to attend the screening, but he did send a video message to audience members expressing his regret for not being there. Even so, excitement was high for an audience that filled literally every seat in the Eccles Theatre in Park City, Utah.Also Read: 'The Dissident' Revives Jamal Khashoggi's Brutal Murder: 'Has the Sacrificial Victim Arrived?'Those expecting a straight drama were surprised by a script that also brought laughs both from its characters and apparent allusions to current events. For instance, one scene depicted Cumberbatch’s almost naive disbelief that he was “having lunch with spies” after he’s first introduced to the mission. Another provided a pithy punch line: asked whether he can hold his liquor, Wynne replies that that’s the “one gift” he has.Particularly big laughter erupted when Ninidze’s Penkovsky talked about Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, who he called “impulsive” and said “a man like that should not be in command.” One guess who the audience assumed that line referred to (Donald Trump).And later still, the audience snickered when Penkovsy says he wants to move to Montana with his family because he’s seen photos and “it’s a beautiful place” — a line we suspect might have been a reference to another Cold War drama, 1990’s “The Hunt for Red October.”The film is primarily focused on tensions between the USSR and USA, but it also looks at the power struggle between MI6 and the CIA, showing how both sides had different perspectives on how to handle the situation. Wynne is a British national and therefore, he falls under The Crown’s jurisdiction, but the CIA, namely the CIA agent Emily Donovan (Rachel Brosnahan) has other plans. Additionally, there are also power struggles in Wynne’s relationship with his wife — notably when he decides to put Penkovsky’s life first, which leads to turmoil in his relationship.Also Read: 'The Assistant' Film Review: Julia Garner Navigates Toxic Work Culture in Subtly Devastating DramaAfter the credits rolled, director Dominic Cooke, producers Ben Pugh, Adam Ackland and Ben Browning, writer Tom O’Connor, Brosnahan and Ninidze came on stage for a Q&A.“I do not like reading scripts, but this one [was exceptional],” Ninidze told the audience, adding that he was extremely nervous. “I told myself I’d do everything to get this part, and I did.”O’Connor explained that Brosnahan’s character never actually existed but instead was composed of many men that had been part of the mission. He explained that they wanted to make it a female character because it added “new texture” to a movie that already had too many men.Perhaps the biggest question on everyone’s minds after the film had ended was how on earth Cumberbatch had lost so much weight (just watch the movie, you’ll see what we mean). Cooke explained that they stopped shooting for three months so Cumberbatch could lose the weight — and “he worked hard” with a nutritionist to make sure it was safe.Brian Welk contributed to this report.Read original story ‘Ironbark': Benedict Cumberbatch’s Timely Cold War Drama Brings Thrills, Unexpected Laughs to Sundance At TheWrap

  • ‘Beast Beast’ Film Review: Empathetic Debut Feature Gets Up Close and Personal With Gen Z
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    ‘Beast Beast’ Film Review: Empathetic Debut Feature Gets Up Close and Personal With Gen Z

    There’s so much that scares me as a parent of a teenager, much of it coming from the knowledge that this generation of teens is unlike any other. Really, it’s uncharted ground in parenting. In his feature film debut, “Beast Beast,” writer-director Danny Madden captures Gen Z in a compelling, raw form; watching as a parent is both insightful and terrifying.Though I have some reservations about a choice made towards the end of the film, everything else — from the cast to the documentary-style filmmaking to the varying perspectives of different characters from diverse backgrounds — is ambitious and intriguing.The film opens with a group of kids in a drama class doing a warm-up exercise. “Beast Beast, ready to act,” they chant as they clap and jump, growing louder and louder by the second. Quickly we’re introduced to Krista (Shirley Chen), an aspiring young actress; Nito (Jose Angeles), the skater and new kid in town; and Adam (Will Madden), the YouTube-ing gun aficionado.Also Read: Where Are the Latinos at Sundance - and How Can Hollywood Really Help? | PRO InsightThey live in a small, southern town, the kind where everyone knows everyone, where the days are tranquil and lives go on as scheduled. But when night falls, teens will be teens, and they find various forms of amusement and trouble.Krista is joyful and dreams of being an actress one day. She giggles about the cute new boy at school, eats junk food and talks excitedly about normal teen things with her friends. When she meets Nito, the sparks are instant, and first love develops naturally and quickly. Nito’s home life isn’t necessarily bad, but he’s not inclined to hang around the house. Nito befriends some older kids, who have questionable hobbies but accept Nito as he is, something every teenager craves. Together, Nito and Krista bask in the sweetness of young romance until a tragedy changes their lives forever.Also Read: 'Mucho Mucho Amor' Film Review: Rapturous Documentary Pays Tribute to Scintillating Oracle Walter MercadoThe doc-style cinematography allows the camera to act as an undercover agent, going deep into Gen Z territory. Director of Photography Kristian Zuniga wisely chooses unorthodox angles and unique frames to bring the audience inside the world of this group of teens. There are even slight variations of the format for each character, most notably how Adam is filmed versus everyone else.Where Krista and Nito have a bit of chaotic but joyful energy in how the camera and lighting frame them, there’s an uneasy stillness in every frame that includes Adam. Zuniga crafts a contrast that elevates each performance and grows the story step by step.Also Read: 'Bad Hair' Film Review: Justin Simien Puts Thoughtful Twists in a Creepy Horror MovieThe cast is comprised mainly of newcomers, and the heaviest dramatic lifting comes from Chen, who is remarkable as Krista. Reprising her role from the short “Krista” (from which “Beast Beast” was adapted), Chen nails the struggles of contemporary young women while also filling Krista with depth and joy. Similarly, newcomer Angeles brings to life a complex young man who struggles to fit in without giving up who he is. Chen and Angeles shine on screen together, complementing one another and delivering that intoxicating giddiness of puppy love.Where the story tilts and makes me question Madden’s intent occurs just before the film ends, but I won’t spoil it here. For me, suffice it to say, this particular choice undermines certain characters and feels obtuse when weighed against the rest of the film. Before this, “Beast Beast” drives home the fact that although Gen Z faces more complex struggles than previous generations, they are also more thoughtful and ready to deal with the issues of the world around them, a message to which older generations should pay attention.Read original story ‘Beast Beast’ Film Review: Empathetic Debut Feature Gets Up Close and Personal With Gen Z At TheWrap

  • ‘The Go-Go’s’ Film Review: Transcendent Rock Doc Examines 1980s Glass-Ceiling Shatterers
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    ‘The Go-Go’s’ Film Review: Transcendent Rock Doc Examines 1980s Glass-Ceiling Shatterers

    The meteoric and ruinous rise to fame is more than a movie cliché; it’s a virtual guarantee for just about any artist without his or her head screwed on straight. But “The Go-Go’s” tackles the seminal all-female ’80s rock band with such honesty, openness and effervescence that it not only rises above that clichéd, almost telegraphed arc but transcends the ranks of other music documentaries to offer a story you desperately want to keep watching, even when you already know where it’s going.It’s fascinating to think of the performers of “Our Lips Are Sealed,” “Head Over Heels” and even their earliest hit “We Got the Beat” as punk rockers, but “The Go-Go’s” reminds audiences of the band’s scrappy origins as a group of young women inspired by the Los Angeles punk scene to start their own band. Though members Belinda Carlisle, Jane Wiedlin, Gina Schock, Charlotte Caffey and Kathy Valentine deny any sort of feminist agenda, the group formed in the late ’70s and quickly scaled local line-ups — and eventually, the pop charts — as the first multi-platinum-selling all-female band to play their own instruments, making history and blazing a trail for dozens upon dozens of future artists.Declining narration or a superfluous framing device, director Alison Ellwood (“American Jihad”) allows all five musicians, as well as interim band members and former manager Ginger Canzoneri, to tell their own story, coaxing a matter-of-fact, almost shockingly candid account of their success (and eventual implosion) both artistically and commercially.Also Read: Showtime Scores Rights to Upcoming Documentary on The Go-Go'sAnyone familiar with the band in the ’80s might expect front woman and vocalist Carlisle to occupy the majority of the spotlight, but each enjoys equal time on screen to explain and explore what inspired, motivated and sometimes undermined their efforts.Caffey, for example, emerged early as lead songwriter, writing eight of 10 songs from their 1981 debut, while apparently nursing a heroin addiction she somewhat successfully hid from the rest of the band. Unsurprisingly, commercial success took a toll on the group as they shuffled breathlessly — and repeatedly — from album to tour and back again, leading to confrontations first with Wiedlin, who felt increasingly marginalized creatively, and later, with Schock, whose remuneration was substantially less than that of the rest of the band. Each recounts the details with an equal amount of kindness, bitterness and perspective, and a sense that they were so close for so long and in such a concentrated moment in time that it created both inevitable conflict and irrepressible affection.Also Read: 'Head Over Heels' Broadway Review: The Go-Go's Travel Back to the 17th CenturyCertainly Ellwood’s access and the openness of the band members assist the cheerfully iconoclastic tone of this Go-Go’s history lesson. But combined with the way she draws out stories about the creation of signature tunes like those mentioned above, viewers get a really rich and compelling sense of how the group evolved from a bunch of restless, ambitious young women into one of the biggest bands in the world, just by crafting some of the most indelible hits of the 1980s. Not only does the film make you want to revisit their albums and replay those songs, but it also creates a real sense of personality and identity for all of the members that will enhance future listens of lesser-known cuts.It’s hard to know if The Go-Go’s can flourish now in the same way they did back in 1981, especially after so many torch-bearers and imitators picked up where they left off. Ellwood documents both the rise and fall and the ultimate redemption of the band personally and artistically, and they do indeed still rock.See Photos: 11 Rock Documentaries You Can Stream Now, From 'Don't Look Back' to 'Amy'But the great victories of “The Go-Go’s” highlight how these women (1) spearheaded an essential, permanent musical movement; (2) escaped addiction, evaded the financial vagaries of the music industry and most of all physically survived their rock ‘n roll glory days; and (3) moved past the clashes and conflicts that derailed their past success and reunited to seek it again in the future.Between 1978 and 2020 there have been a lot of definitions of “girl power,” but Ellwood’s film suggests that one of the most important, and enduring, is a capacity for forgiveness. Seldom does a music documentary successfully argue for the merits of individual (or collective) musicians as effectively as the iconic songs they created, but “The Go-Go’s” uniquely manages to showcase the essential, resilient, irrepressible humanity of their history every bit as vividly as it celebrates their art.Read original story ‘The Go-Go’s’ Film Review: Transcendent Rock Doc Examines 1980s Glass-Ceiling Shatterers At TheWrap

  • Sony Pushes ‘Uncharted’ Movie Back 3 Months, Takes ‘Masters of the Universe’ Off the Schedule
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    Sony Pushes ‘Uncharted’ Movie Back 3 Months, Takes ‘Masters of the Universe’ Off the Schedule

    Sony has pushed back the release date of its live-action adaptation of “Uncharted” from Dec 18, 2020 to March 5, 2021, the date originally set aside for the studio’s live-action adaptation of the “Masters of the Universe” cartoon series and toy line.“Masters of the Universe” has subsequently been removed from Sony’s release schedule and is now dated “TBD” by the studio.Based on the popular Playstation action-adventure video game series, “Uncharted” will star Tom Holland as Nathan Drake, a treasure hunter and adventurer whose quests for rare and mythical artifacts often runs him afoul of drug lords, war criminals and other assorted bad guys. A director for the film hasn’t been formally announced, but just this month Ruben Fleischer (“Zombieland: Double Tap”, “Venom”) became Sony’s top choice.Also Read: 'Sonic the Hedgehog' Expected to Spin Dash to $45 Million Opening at Box OfficeMost recently set to be directed and co-written by Aaron and Adam Nee, “Masters of the Universe” will follow the adventures of He-Man, a powerful warrior who defends the magical planet Eternia from the machinations of the evil wizard Skeletor. It’s based on the hugely popular line of toys launched in 1982 that spawned an equally successful cartoon adaptation, “He-Man and the Masters of the Universe,” and a spinoff, “She-Ra: Princess of Power.” Noah Centineo has been cast as He-Man.Sony has also moved “Happiest Season,” it’s LGBT romantic comedy starring Kristen Stewart and Mackenzie Davis, to Nov. 25, 2020, five days later than originally scheduled, while the Kevin Hart drama “Fatherhood” has pushed back 7 days to January 15, 2021.Finally, the studio has slated “Man From Toronto,” a previously unannounced film from Columbia Pictures, for Nov. 20, 2020Read original story Sony Pushes ‘Uncharted’ Movie Back 3 Months, Takes ‘Masters of the Universe’ Off the Schedule At TheWrap

  • ‘Never Rarely Sometimes Always’ Film Review: Eliza Hittman’s Powerful Teen Abortion Drama Explores Access and Friendship
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    ‘Never Rarely Sometimes Always’ Film Review: Eliza Hittman’s Powerful Teen Abortion Drama Explores Access and Friendship

    Few indie directors today navigate private spaces and fraught environments as effectively as Eliza Hittman, whose first two features “It Felt Like Love” and “Beach Rats” heralded a singular chronicler of young people in the thick of complicated desire.With “Never Rarely Sometimes Always,” which premiered at Sundance and will be released by Focus on March 13, Hittman looks at one of the consequences of desire, as specifically experienced by the half that can get pregnant. In relaying a pair of teenage cousins’ tense overnight journey across the state line, Hittman wades into one of the more charged subjects of our time — abortion access — with the kind of sensitivity, focus and detail that will ensure its place as a dramatic standard for how to put a human face on a controversial topic.Despite a tone that avoids explicit politics, there’s absolutely no question where Hittman’s sympathies lie as she unfolds her near-procedural story of the events surrounding a momentous decision made decisively. And yet it’s in the obstacle-laden path of her central character (who can know, who will help, how she’ll get it, what it takes) that the film gathers in force to become a quietly urgent portrait of womanhood as a still-and-ever social-legal minefield of expectations, strictures and imperiled agency.Also Read: Oscars 2020: Women Scored Record 31% of Nominations Overall Despite Female Director SnubThe title itself — referencing the choices offered high schooler Autumn (newcomer Sidney Flanigan) on a medical form about her sexual history — speaks both to the aura of assessment and limitation women can be made to feel even in what should be the safest of spaces and to the temporality inherent in any story whose subject reflects on the plight of women to control their own destiny.Arriving the year after we lost Agnès Varda, Hittman’s film feels like an essential continuation of that masterful French filmmaker’s legacy of stories about women making their way through life’s gauntlets. And considering the fact that Hittman’s returning “Beach Rats” cinematographer Hélène Louvart once worked with Varda (on “The Beaches of Agnès”), that connection across the span of female-made art feels even more apt.When we first see 17-year-old Autumn, she’s in a talent show ironically singing a folk rendition of the ’60s girl-group lament “He’s Got The Power.” The subtext is apparent later at a pizza parlor, sitting with her clueless mom (Sharon Van Etten, “The OA”) and brittle stepfather (Ryan Eggold, “New Amsterdam”) — they see Autumn as just a scowling pill — when she bolts from the table and throws water in the face of a taunting teenage boy.See Photos: Every Female Director Nominated for an Oscar, From Lina Wertmuller to Greta GerwigThe next day, after looking at her stomach in the mirror, she ventures to a local “women’s clinic” in her rural Pennsylvania town only to find drugstore pregnancy kits, scant medical advice, and a suspiciously positive grandma vibe that emphasizes motherhood or adoption. When the reality of Autumn’s tight-lipped distress becomes apparent to best bud, cousin and co-worker Skylar (Talia Ryder) at their cashier’s job, Skylar takes charge, arranging a secret one-day bus trip to a Brooklyn Planned Parenthood, accompanying her for support.In New York, they encounter further roadblocks and detours, none of which suggest, thankfully, any unnecessary plot engineering on Hittman’s part. Between the pair’s struggles with funds, new knowledge, irritation and navigating an unfamiliar city — is the handsome young stranger (Théodore Pellerin, “On Becoming a God in Central Florida”) who chats the girls up a nuisance or a possible ally? — the vibe is authentically taut and naturalistic about the obstacles facing women in Autumn’s situation.It’s also telling that we don’t even learn Autumn’s and Skylar’s names until well into the movie; Hittman’s sense of exposition has always been loose and oblique, but it’s in the service of revealing her characters through an internal weather system that emerges in behavior, words, and her actors’ expressions. The detail of a look or gesture of individuality — the excellent Ryder’s watchful eyes and steadfast actions, for example, playing a best friend — point us to who she is more than keeping track of her name. It’s almost a form of authorial protectiveness, a way for Hittman to point us to what matters: the humanity in her characters.Also Read: Lena Waithe, Veena Sud and Kaitlin Olson Tout Quibi at Sundance for 'Primal' and 'Empowered' ExperienceAnd Flanigan’s face as an emotional bellwether is a powerful one, never more so than in the pivotal scene when she answers a compassionate clinic worker’s difficult queries about her past, and her sense of security. As the camera stays on Autumn, the formality of real help in a safe environment starts to allow a small measure of painfully reflective release in her typically stoic features. It’s a quietly devastating scene, the poignant center of Flanigan’s magnetic turn, but also one that illuminates the other key theme to Hittman’s movie: the solidarity, whether prompted by a concerned woman’s questions or a best friend’s unspoken companionship, that makes the hardest of journeys doable.It finds its most poetic expression in twin shots, scenes apart, of Autumn and Skylar holding hands, each scenario spurred by one reaching for the other as if to say “You’re not alone.” That connection is also one of the wonders of the movies, and why “Never Rarely Sometimes Always” and its portrait of a timeless female fortitude stands as an especially potent and timely act of artistic storytelling empathy.Read original story ‘Never Rarely Sometimes Always’ Film Review: Eliza Hittman’s Powerful Teen Abortion Drama Explores Access and Friendship At TheWrap

  • Will Sunday’s Grammys Be Overshadowed by Accusations of ‘Corrupt’ Voting and First Female CEO’s Ouster?
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    Will Sunday’s Grammys Be Overshadowed by Accusations of ‘Corrupt’ Voting and First Female CEO’s Ouster?

    This Sunday’s 62nd annual Grammy Awards threatens to be upstaged by the backstage drama that erupted at the Recording Academy just 10 days before Music’s Biggest Night with ousted CEO Deborah Dugan’s accusations of a “corrupt” voting process and a toxic “old boys club” culture.The scandal “is all anyone is talking about,” one music industry executive told TheWrap. “I’m going to a Grammy adjacent event … The event will start and we will pretend it’s not happening. And then the event will be over and everyone will go back to talking about it.”An artist manager who has been involved with the Recording Academy for over a decade said, “I have heard immense relief from managers of artists who don’t need to go this year, and I can’t blame them — that red carpet is going to be a living nightmare for everyone involved.”Also Read: 4 Female Recording Academy Trustees Push Back on Deborah Dugan's 'Boys Club' CriticismThe awkward timing of Dugan’s removal as the Recording Academy’s first female boss — and the salacious accusations that have emerged since — have consumed the music world. On Friday, Variety reported that Taylor Swift pulled out of an unofficial performance slot on the show that had not yet been announced. Reps for Swift did not respond to a request for comment.In a complaint filed Tuesday with the EEOC, Dugan said her predecessor Neil Portnow had been accused of rape — an accusation he vehemently denied — and that the Recording Academy’s general counsel, Joel Katz, has sexually harassed her — which Katz also denied. In addition, she said the nomination process for the Grammy Awards was tainted by conflicts of interest and sometimes manipulated by the board members representing artists up for nominations — which the Academy has denied.Host Alicia Keys and nominated artists who are lined up to perform face enormous challenges given the suddenly fraught environment. “What do you say in interviews? If you win, what do you say from the stage? It’s a PR catch-22 the likes of which we have not seen in years,” the music manager said. “If you don’t say anything, you’re a chickens— who is part of the problem. If you say something, even something vague, you’ve pissed off the Grammys and Joel Katz and probably a whole bunch of other old white dudes who can ruin your career before lunch and never give it a second thought. It’s an impossible situation.”One music publicist noted, “It’s all timing. This is something the Grammys tried to quietly sweep under the rug and it’s coming back to bite them.”Also Read: Recording Academy Denies Grammy Nomination Voting Is 'Corrupt,' Calls Process 'Fair and Ethical'The music exec also wondered why the Recording Academy didn’t work harder to keep this all under wraps for just a little while longer. “In what world could you not keep it together for 10 more days?” the exec wondered. “Offer her a suite at the Ojai Valley Inn for nine days. Talk the Monday afterward.”The music business has been celebrating at various events all week leading up to the show, which has provided plenty of opportunities for varying people within the industry to socialize.“Everyone is talking about it at every single industry event,” a veteran music journalist told TheWrap, adding that “multiple” publicists and reporters had broached the topic at events this week.The journalist continued, “I don’t think it will overshadow the ceremony but for winners this year it’s like, ‘Well, did they deserve it? Can they celebrate with all this going on without some feeling of guilt?”Thom Geier, Nate Jackson and Sharon Waxman contributed to this report. Read original story Will Sunday’s Grammys Be Overshadowed by Accusations of ‘Corrupt’ Voting and First Female CEO’s Ouster? At TheWrap

  • ‘The Dissident’ Revives Jamal Khashoggi’s Brutal Murder: ‘Has the Sacrificial Victim Arrived?’
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    ‘The Dissident’ Revives Jamal Khashoggi’s Brutal Murder: ‘Has the Sacrificial Victim Arrived?’

    There are few international crimes more outrageous than the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, slaughtered by agents of his own government at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul over a year ago.Time has passed; the world has moved on. But a new documentary about exactly what happened to him is sure to stir renewed outrage, providing excruciating details of the execution itself and deeper context around Saudi Arabia’s manipulation of social media to control and punish those who speak out.“The Dissident,” by the Oscar-winning filmmaker Bryan Fogel, premiered at the Sundance Film Festival on Friday and received a standing ovation before a group that included Khashoggi’s former fiancé, Arab freedom activists and a U.N. official who reported on the atrocity and recommended action against the regime’s leader Mohammad Bin Salman, or MBS. (None was taken.)Also Read: Saudi Arabia Sentences 5 People to Death for Jamal Khashoggi MurderWe all recall the brazen act: A distinguished journalist who wrote for The Washington Post’s opinion page, a critic of Saudi Arabia, murdered in broad daylight on foreign soil by Saudi agents, then cut into pieces by a government physician to remove his remains. The act was denied by Saudi Arabia until international outrage forced a series of half-hearted confessions.The film is “a call to action to continue to fight for Jamal’s legacy and what he believed in,” Fogel said before the screening.“The Dissident” may feel like it rambles in parts, and it does. But there is no denying the searing power of the story as it describes Khashoggi’s last moments, which history documents verbatim and with live audio thanks to the Turkish recording of the apparently-bugged consulate.The scene is stomach-turning. Khashoggi arrived at the consulate on Oct. 2, 2018, to pick up a document for his marriage, as his fiancé Hatice Cengiz remains outside.“Has the sacrificial victim arrived?” asks a Saudi official, according to the transcript.“Yes,” comes the answer.“Thank God.”Also Read: Saudi Officials Admit Jamal Khashoggi Was Killed at Istanbul ConsulateKhashoggi is quickly confronted by the consul-general, who demands that he send his family a dictated text. Khashoggi refuses, but that exchange is quickly cut short as the killing team closes in. “Don’t do this!” Khashoggi shouts, as he eyes a towel and asks if they intend to anesthetize him.If only. No, instead the killers — who are identified by name in the film — suffocate him over seven and a half minutes, possibly using a plastic bag. “Clothes, clothes,” one barks, taking off Khashoggi’s clothes for a decoy to wear out on the street in a bid to misinform.The military doctor discusses the size of body parts as he cuts them with a bonesaw and fits them in plastic cases. The film does not play the audio — which is a blessing — but even the English-language transcript is enough of a horror show. The military doctor discusses the size of body parts as he cuts and fits them in plastic cases.What kind of government does this? The government of MBS, which also embarked on a massive campaign to discredit Khashoggi, using a Twitter farm to call him a traitor and worse. Few remain to speak for him besides the courageous Cengiz, who devotes her time to keeping Khashoggi’s memory alive. Khashoggi’s children and other family members do not speak up — they live in Saudi Arabia, silenced.Also Read: About That Saudi Tsunami That Just Washed Through HollywoodThe film also introduces us to another Saudi dissident, the much-younger Omar Abdulaziz, who worked with Khashoggi to fight for free expression and a more open government, as well as a counter-Twitter campaign driven by fellow activists. Abdulaziz has political asylum in Canada, where he has started an online talk show.But it is clear that not only has Saudi Arabia hacked Abdulaziz’s phone, from which authorities may have learned about Khashoggi’s movements, but — as we have just learned — the phone of Amazon chief and Washington Post owner Jeff Bezos. Bezos met MBS on a tour to the United States, and a U.N. special rapporteur concludes in the film that MBS infiltrated Bezos’s phone when they exchanged numbers.All of this disturbing information bears renewed attention on this case and how the world regards Saudi Arabia, which is trying hard to sell its message of reform and attract investment for a post-oil reality.Fogel was moved to tell Khashoggi’s story on the heels of winning Best Documentary at the Academy Awards to “Icarus,” a story about sports, doping, Russia and Olympic corruption, he said in an interview at TheWrap’s studio at Sundance on Friday.He said he hopes the world will still take punitive action against Saudi Arabia on behalf of a man who loved his country and wanted the best for it.The film closes with a tragic ending shot of Khashoggi’s grave. The journalist who yearned for the right to live freely in his own country does not even have the dignity of an Arabic-language epitaph. His name is inscribed in Turkish on his tombstone.Read original story ‘The Dissident’ Revives Jamal Khashoggi’s Brutal Murder: ‘Has the Sacrificial Victim Arrived?’ At TheWrap

  • ‘Jumbo’ Film Review: Offbeat Love Story Joins Woman and Park Attraction For an Unusual Ride
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    ‘Jumbo’ Film Review: Offbeat Love Story Joins Woman and Park Attraction For an Unusual Ride

    Do you love your car? Or do you, um, love your car? And what if it loved you back?“Jumbo,” a movie inspired by the real-life woman who married the Eiffel Tower, claiming she’d fallen passionately in love with it, is Belgian writer-director Zoé Wittock’s fractured fairy tale of a feature debut about a withdrawn young woman played by “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” star Noémie Merlant, who develops deep emotional feelings for her local park’s newest passenger-spinning, brightly illuminated ride.While it’s easy to imagine filmmakers from all parts of the outcast-fantasy firmament responding with glee at the cinematic doorways waiting to be opened if “Jumbo” shows post-festival life — Spielberg, Cronenberg, start your human-loves-thing engines! — Wittock’s film is ultimately more of a well-intended melodramatic experiment than a fully realized love story about one of the more curious corners of humanity’s sexual-psychological tapestry.Also Read: 'Portrait of a Lady on Fire' Film Review: Ravishing Drama Is a Feminist Tale From a Pre-Feminist WorldObject sexuality is a documented subject, after all — albeit still questioned as to whether it’s a pathology/kink or a biological reality with ties to autism’s particular brain wiring — and Wittock makes no bones about treating her coming-of-age scenario as no different than any other tale of love built in secret and intimidated by intolerance. That may rub some people the wrong way, but Wittock’s commitment level to her story as a dramatic, and even occasionally humorous, case for empathy and imagination is considerable, and likely to make for interesting post-viewing conversations once everyone gets their nervous smiles (and jokes) out of the way.Shy and socially awkward, Jeanne (Merlant) lives at home with her extrovert divorcee mom Margarette (Emmanuelle Bercot), a sexually free-spirited bartender who’d love nothing more than to see her hermit-like daughter hook up with a man. When Jeanne starts work as a night-shift cleaner at the local amusement park and unwittingly attracts the attention of a kind-faced but insistent young male employee (Bastien Bouillon), it delights mom no end, even as it causes Jeanne discomfort.See Photos: 16 Buzziest Sundance Movies for Sale in 2020, From Julianne Moore's 'The Glorias' to Michael Keaton's 'Worth'In the sanctity of her room, though, where she can escape human contact, Jeanne indulges what most excites her — a connection with inanimate objects that sees her creating miniature wire-sculpture versions of theme park rides, illuminated by colored lights that create a private-space canopy of sorts.It’s a fascination that finds its most consequential pull at her job, where she starts eyeing the gleaming new Tilt-a-Whirl (called Move It) with something like heart-palpitating, nervous attraction as she spends an inordinate amount of time cleaning it (yes, knobs are lovingly polished), then talking to it, then dreaming about it, and eventually bringing herself to sexual release with it in quasi-fantastic reveries that Wittock films with plenty of nudity and gallons of dripping, pooling machine oil. Even more alarming, the mechanized behemoth responds like a turned-on boyfriend, through hydraulic movement and red (for no) and green (for yes) lights.Also Read: Oscars 2020: Women Scored Record 31% of Nominations Overall Despite Female Director SnubTo Jeanne, machines have souls, and Jumbo, as she calls “him,” becomes her first love, inspiring no small amount of consternation in her mom when she finds out, and the requisite — ahem — rollercoaster of emotions when the opportunity to spend time with Jumbo is threatened. She finds an unlikely ally, however, in mom’s gruff new boyfriend Hubert (Sam Louwyck, “Bullhead”), who takes a love-is-love view that ultimately factors into how everything is resolved.It’s a lot to digest as a love-that-dare-not-speak-its-name story, and Wittock can’t always wrangle her “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” meets Cronenberg’s “Crash” mix of otherworldly feeling, erotic awakening, and anthropomorphic romance into something cohesive and charged. It helps, however, that Merlant is her lead, as she whips up a heady brew of nervousness and sensuality, and eventually stand-by-her-machine righteousness and even lovestruck anger.Bercot has a deceptively hard role — the reactor in a scenario like this typically does — but what’s deep-set in her vivacious if oppressive mom is effortlessly conveyed. As for Jumbo’s presence as an oscillating, heaving and spiraling scene partner, Wittock and cinematographer Thomas Buelens keep a certain mystery to his “consciousness” that makes for a kind of psychological suspense as it relates to Jeanne’s state of mind, but the filmmaker’s attempts to imbue the Jeanne-Jumbo scenes with the requisite mix of wonder and woolliness are more likely to spark titters than transcendence.The best one can say about “Jumbo” is that in its bid for a new romantic extreme it spins with abandon, which makes it watchable if not exactly compelling as something you can get swept up in, too.Read original story ‘Jumbo’ Film Review: Offbeat Love Story Joins Woman and Park Attraction For an Unusual Ride At TheWrap

  • NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly Says Mike Pompeo Swore and Yelled at Her for Asking About Ukraine
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    NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly Says Mike Pompeo Swore and Yelled at Her for Asking About Ukraine

    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo shouted profanities and insults at NPR reporter Mary Louise Kelly after she asked him about Ukraine during an interview, Kelly said Friday.In the interview, which aired Friday on “Morning Edition,” Kelly asked Pompeo several questions about the Ukraine scandal that led congress to impeach Donald Trump. Pompeo repeatedly declined to answer her questions and at one point claimed he had only agreed to speak about Iran; Kelly replied that his staff signed off on questions about both Iran and Ukraine.Despite the dispute, Pompeo remained calm during the taping. However, NPR later reported that “immediately after the questions on Ukraine, the interview concluded. Pompeo stood, leaned in and silently glared at Kelly for a period of several seconds before leaving the room.”Also Read: Is Trump's Space Force Logo a Copycat of Starfleet's From 'Star Trek'? (Sure Looks Like It)Kelly was then summoned into a separate room, where according to NPR, “Pompeo shouted his displeasure at being questioned about Ukraine,” using “repeated expletives” and asking her, “Do you think Americans care about Ukraine?”Appearing on “All Things Considered” later on Friday, Kelly further explained what happened. “I was taken to the Secretary’s private living room, where he was waiting, and where he shouted at me for about the same amount of time as the interview itself had lasted,” she said.“He used the f-word in that sentence, and many others,” she continued. “He asked if I could find Ukraine on a map. I said yes. He called out for his aides to bring him a map of the world with no writing, no countries marked. I pointed to Ukraine. He put the map away. He said, ‘People will hear about this,’ and then he turned and said he had things to do, and I thanked him again for his time and left.”Also Read: National Review Editorial Calls Out GOP for 'Embarrassing' Conduct During Trump ImpeachmentThe Trump administration did not immediately respond to a request for comment from TheWrap.Read original story NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly Says Mike Pompeo Swore and Yelled at Her for Asking About Ukraine At TheWrap

  • Why ‘Sabrina’ Finally Crossed Over Into Riverdale – Without Actually Doing a ‘Riverdale’ Crossover
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    Why ‘Sabrina’ Finally Crossed Over Into Riverdale – Without Actually Doing a ‘Riverdale’ Crossover

    (Warning: This post contains spoilers for Episodes 303 of “Chilling Adventures of Sabrina.”)Welp, “Chilling Adventures of Sabrina” fans almost got the “Riverdale” crossover they’ve been hoping for since the Netflix series launched in October 2018, when Sabrina (Kiernan Shipka) briefly left her home of Greendale to travel to the neighboring town of Riverdale in Episode 3 of Season 3, which launched Friday.She made the journey in order to tap a maple tree owned by Cheryl Blossom’s (Madelaine Petsch) family to collect King Herod’s crown as part of her race with Caliban (Sam Corlett) to collect the Unholy Regalia.But just because Sabrina physically crossed over into Riverdale, does not a “Sabrina”-“Riverdale” crossover episode make, since she didn’t interact with Archie (KJ Apa) or anyone else from The CW drama.Also Read: 45 Most Shocking TV Character Deaths of 2019, From 'Game of Thrones' to 'Stranger Things' (Photos)We know, you’re disappointed, but Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, who is showrunner on both “Archieverse” series and the Chief Creative Officer of Archie Comics, tells TheWrap he had his reasons — and still hasn’t given up on doing an actual mashup.“I think what [that scene] speaks to is my deep desire to do a true crossover,” Aguirre-Sacasa told TheWrap. “I also love Easter eggs and I love sly references to the characters. So it’s funny, when we were trying to figure out where Herod’s crown could be hidden, it was like, what about Riverdale? Sure! And it could be in a maple tree. So I think it’s more a fun Easter egg and more a fun meta-reference.”Aguirre-Sacasa also couldn’t help himself from slipping in Sabrina and Ambrose’s (Chance Perdomo) deep fear of Riverdale as a horrifying town — when they are currently dealing with Hell and the literal Devil.Also Read: Winter TV 2020: Premiere Dates for New and Returning Shows (Photos)“I love that,” he told us, laughing. “I love that Riverdale, everyone is terrified of Riverdale.”“Chilling Adventures of Sabrina” Season 3 is streaming now on Netflix. Check back with TheWrap for more from our interview with Aguirre-Sacasa throughout the weekend — once you finish all eight episodes, of course.Read original story Why ‘Sabrina’ Finally Crossed Over Into Riverdale – Without Actually Doing a ‘Riverdale’ Crossover At TheWrap

  • Is Trump’s Space Force Logo a Copycat of Starfleet’s From ‘Star Trek’? (Sure Looks Like It)
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    Is Trump’s Space Force Logo a Copycat of Starfleet’s From ‘Star Trek’? (Sure Looks Like It)

    Proving that there is no idea so bad it can’t easily be made worse, on Friday the Trump administration unveiled the logo for the Space Force branch of the military, and it pretty much looks just like one of the most iconic elements of the “Star Trek” franchise.Compare and contrast: On the left side of the image above is the logo for Space Force (which, for those of you wondering, is part of the air force and not actually a separate branch of the military); and on the right is the emblem of Starfleet Command, the scientific and military space force for the United Federation of Planets.The logo is probably where the resemblance between Space Force and Starfleet ends, unless we’ve completely misjudged Trump that is. It’s unlikely Trump actually is trying to create a post-scarcity, post-money utopia founded on principles of peaceful coexistence, shared abundance, secularism, science, and equality like the one depicted in the TV shows and films set in the “Star Trek” universe.Also Read: New Space Force Uniforms Mocked for Camo Design: 'Are They Fighting on the Forest Moon of Endor?'Now, in fairness, the new Space Force logo is actually based on the preexisting Air Force Space Command logo, which was established in 1982 and rendered obsolete by Space Force. Here’s what that looks like:Even so, that logo was invented a full 16 years after the first season of “Star Trek,” and in the same year “Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan” was a huge hit for Paramount, and between you and us, it’s impossible to look at it and not immediately think of “Star Trek.” And if anything, the Space Force logo only makes the similarities to the Federation military symbol even more obvious. So until we hear otherwise we’re going to assume this was absolutely intentional.Of course, there’s another possibility we haven’t considered: What if we’re the evil alternate universe where “evil goatee Spock” comes from? Just kidding.Space Force going boldly where no copyright has gone before comes just a week after the widespread ridicule that greeted the unveiling of its first official uniforms, which are camouflaged just like terrestrial military uniforms. The official Space Force Twitter account later clarified that it “is utilizing current Army/Air Force uniforms, saving costs of designing/producing a new one. Members will look like their joint counterparts they’ll be working with, on the ground.” It’s an admirable commitment to cost-savings that has been extended to their logo.Representatives for CBS, which owns the rights to “Star Trek,” did not immediately respond to a request for comment from TheWrap.Read original story Is Trump’s Space Force Logo a Copycat of Starfleet’s From ‘Star Trek’? (Sure Looks Like It) At TheWrap

  • Marvel TV Shows ‘Howard the Duck’ and ‘Tigra & Dazzler’ Will Not Move Forward at Hulu
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    Marvel TV Shows ‘Howard the Duck’ and ‘Tigra & Dazzler’ Will Not Move Forward at Hulu

    Marvel’s “Howard the Duck” and “Tigra & Dazzler” animated series are no longer moving forward at Hulu, an individual with knowledge of the projects told TheWrap.The other two, “M.O.D.O.K.” and “Hit Monkey,” are still in development. The individual added that the decision to scrap the two shows came from Marvel. With half of the planned four series now dead, the crossover “The Offenders” is also unlikely to happen.Last year, Hulu announced an expansive multi-series commitment with Marvel TV that would consist of the aforementioned four series, and the crossover. This now leaves Hulu with only three Marvel TV series, as Kevin Feige continues to wind down Marvel TV’s roster in the months after it was moved under Marvel Studios. In addition to the two animated series, Hulu is also developing a live-action “Helstrom” series, which will star Elizabeth Marvel, Tom Austen and Sydney Lemmon.Also Read: How 'Runaways' Got Caught in the Middle of Marvel TV's Corporate RestructuringEarlier this week, Hulu announced the voice cast for “M.O.D.O.K.,” which will star and be written by Patton Oswalt. He is joined by Ben Schwartz, Melissa Fumero, Beck Bennet, Sam Richardson, Wendi McLendon-Covey, Jon Daly and Aimee Garcia. “Tigra & Dazzler” had previously halted development in December, with Erica Rivinoja leaving as showrunner over creative differences.In October, Marvel TV was moved under Marvel Studios and Kevin Feige, who was named chief creative officer across all of Marvel. Since then, Jeph Loeb stepped down as head of Marvel TV and all future development was shuttered. Marvel TV staff, including Karim Zreik, senior vice president of current programming and production and members of his team, moved over to the Marvel Studios group, with Zreik in charge of all current projects in production.“Cloak & Dagger” was cancelled after two seasons at Freeform, and “The Runaways” closed after three seasons, with the third premiering on Hulu last month. The first Marvel TV show, “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,” will end its seven-season run on ABC this summer.Marvel Studios is planning its own foray into the small screen with eight different shows for Disney+. Those include “The Falcon and The Winter Soldier,” “WandaVision,” “Loki” and “Hawkeye,” which all star characters from the hugely popular Marvel Cinematic Universe.Read original story Marvel TV Shows ‘Howard the Duck’ and ‘Tigra & Dazzler’ Will Not Move Forward at Hulu At TheWrap

  • Does ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?
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    Does ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

    “Star Wars” fans have been spoiled over the past five years, at least in terms of the sheer amount of new franchise content we’ve gotten. Five movies, multiple TV shows including the first live-action series, and countless other ancillary materials. But things are about to slow down, with the movies going on hiatus and the live-action Obi-Wan Kenobi series getting a major delay. But at least “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” is so full of things to discuss and argue about that it should last us for a while.So far “The Rise of Skywalker” has earned the worst Rotten Tomatoes percentage, at 52 percent as of this writing, of the franchise, edging out the 53 percent that “The Phantom Menace” earned back in 1999. Even “Attack of the Clones” managed to get a 65-percent positive rating. Not that a Tomatometer score is necessarily a good gauge of how a film will be remembered, but it certainly works as a gauge for the how the discourse is going right now — which is to say that there’s been a lot of arguing about this one.With the “Star Wars” films going on break for the next three years after “The Rise of Skywalker,” and given that “The Mandalorian” hasn’t really driven much in the way of fun “Star Wars” discourse outside of all those Baby Yoda memes, maybe it’s a good thing that we got a film that’s causing so much consternation. We don’t get enough chances as it is to fight with everyone we know about something that actually doesn’t really matter. So we have to make it count when the opportunity arises.Also Read: 'Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker' Actually Makes 'The Last Jedi' and 'The Force Awakens' WorseGiven the impending hiatus for the films, it’s valid to wonder if “The Rise of Skywalker” might want to get into the post-credits scene game. Not all post-credits scenes are teases for future movies — there are plenty that simply serve as an extended epilogue.  So is now the time when “Star Wars” joins this popular trend, by throwing in a bonus mid- or post-credits scene?Unfortunately for fans hoping for any extra content during or after the credits, “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” has no post-credits or mid-credits scenes. Once the credits begin, the movie has no more content for you beyond just the credits themselves. We’ve still never had a post-credits scene on any “Star Wars” movie.Given how many people put in a lot of work to bring the film to life, it’s not the worst idea in the world to stick around in appreciation for their effort. But if you gotta go, you gotta go — and you can rest assured you aren’t missing something crucial if you head out when the credits start.Read original story Does ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker’ Have a Post-Credits Scene? At TheWrap

  • ‘Happy Happy Joy Joy’ Film Review: ‘Ren & Stimpy’ Doc Celebrates Animation But Shies Away From Darker Subjects
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    ‘Happy Happy Joy Joy’ Film Review: ‘Ren & Stimpy’ Doc Celebrates Animation But Shies Away From Darker Subjects

    Don’t be fooled by the title: “Happy Happy Joy Joy: The Ren & Stimpy Story” may be the story of “Ren & Stimpy,” but it’s not a happy, happy story documentary, nor does it evoke joy or joy.Ron Cicero and Kimo Easterwood’s film about the smash hit Nickelodeon animated series and its many artists, and series creator John Kricfalusi in particular, features interesting behind-the-scenes stories but pads the running time with redundancies. Worse, it never adequately engages with the most horrifying elements of this tale.To watch cartoons in the early 1990s was to watch “Ren & Stimpy,” a trailblazing series about an emotionally abusive chihuahua named Ren, a good-natured doormat of a cat named Stimpy, and their gross, non-sensical, censorship-defying adventures. “Ren & Stimpy” was a critical and commercial success, crass in its subject matter but beautiful in its execution. It smashed expectations of TV animation, which had hitherto been relatively low on American networks. Plus, it was really, really, really gross.Also Read: 'Ren & Stimpy' Creator John Kricfalusi Accused of Sexual Misconduct by 2 Women (Report)It’s nothing short of amazing that a show like “Ren & Stimpy” — a series for little kids with episodes about pectoral replacement surgery and weepy relationships with anthropomorphic farts — got made at all. That’s the story that “Happy Happy Joy Joy” is happiest-happiest and most joyful-joyful to tell. For a long time, it’s a plucky, can-do story about a group of ambitious young artists who united under Kricfalusi to produce unique animation. A rags to riches story. A story of rock stars.And, like any rock star biopic, the animators at Spümcø, Inc. were destined for a fall. Kricfalusi’s passion for animation, wild pitching style and extreme perfectionism, celebrated at the beginning of his career, led to abusive relationships with his employees and antagonistic relationships with Nickelodeon. He wasn’t the only artist to let his ego undermine his career but, as one of “Happy Happy Joy Joy’s” many interview subjects sums it up: “Nobody else worked harder to f–k it up than this guy.”Also Read: 'Venom' Star Tom Hardy Compares Marvel Antihero to 'Ren and Stimpy'For nearly 90 minutes, “Happy Happy Joy Joy” is a sentimental look back at the history and significance of “Ren & Stimpy.” Cicero and Easterwood lay out the events that transpired and, just as importantly, the artistic innovations that “Ren & Stimpy” either pioneered or reimagined. Various scenes from multiple episodes are broken down in some riveting analyses of the craft, displaying how the animation geniuses at Spümcø, Inc. used elastic, off-model characterizations and extreme expressionistic storytelling to shock and engage the audience at the same time.Unfortunately, not every aspect of “The Ren & Stimpy Story” is equally enthralling, and “Happy Happy Joy Joy” frequently resorts to sequences of multiple interview subjects saying basically the same thing, or sharing anecdotes that are redundant or go nowhere. Spümcø co-founder Lynne Naylor has one story about pickles that just gradually peters off into non-existence, which is somewhat whimsical but wholly off-topic.What’s more frustrating is “Happy Happy Joy Joy’s” tendency to break from its narrative flow and occasionally just cut to more talking heads so they can rave about how great “Ren & Stimpy” was. That’s all well and good, but sheesh, we’re an hour into the movie and we’re all on the same page by now. The time has long since come to move on.Also Read: How Harvey Weinstein's LA Sexual Assault Charges Could Impact New York TrialAnd the time to address the disturbing elephant in the room has long since passed by the time “Happy Happy Joy Joy” finally gets to John Kricfalusi’s disturbing relationship with an underage, aspiring animator. Ordinarily a development so incredibly shocking would be front-and-center in a documentary like this, but — perhaps in an effort to primarily focus on the “Ren & Stimpy” parts — the filmmakers haven’t just buried the lede, they’ve practically hidden the headstone.It’s not that “Happy Happy Joy Joy” completely ignores the story; Robyn Byrd appears halfway through the documentary to talk about writing fan mail about the series, and the filmmakers pointedly leave in a candid moment where Kricfalusi lewdly licks his lips and makes uncomfortable remarks about the woman doing his makeup before an interview. But these foreshadowings don’t build organically to the film’s conclusion, nor does the film spend nearly enough time discussing how the history of “Ren & Stimpy” has been forever tainted by the actions of its credited creator.In its final 15 minutes, at least, “Happy Happy Joy Joy” does ask some serious and significant questions about the cartoon’s legacy. Can a show with so many twisted, tasteless jokes still be enjoyed now that we know what we now know about John Kricfalusi? Robyn Byrd has a thoughtful answer, but the discussion probably demands a little more screen time than is given to Jack Black to talk about how neat “Ren & Stimpy” was when it first came out.And since “Happy Happy Joy Joy” includes new interview footage with Kricfalusi, the filmmakers do confront him directly about his life, an opportunity he uses predominantly to excuse himself. The film concludes with a bizarre moment from the animator as he completely plays down the most disturbing parts of his life. It’s odd to give Kricfalusi the last word, and what he does with the opportunity is most unpleasant.Cicero and Easterwood’s film plays a lot like a loving ode to a beloved children’s series that got hijacked all of a sudden by harsh reality, and it doesn’t handle the transition well. For “Ren & Stimpy” fans, the documentary has an enormous amount of value, taking us behind the scenes of a fascinating chapter in animation history. But for documentary fans, it’s a haphazardly paced and awkwardly structured film that struggles to organically incorporate each facet of the tragic “Ren & Stimpy” story, ultimately giving too short a shrift to the greatest tragedy of all.Read original story ‘Happy Happy Joy Joy’ Film Review: ‘Ren & Stimpy’ Doc Celebrates Animation But Shies Away From Darker Subjects At TheWrap

  • ‘The Assistant’ Film Review: Julia Garner Navigates Toxic Work Culture in Subtly Devastating Drama
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    ‘The Assistant’ Film Review: Julia Garner Navigates Toxic Work Culture in Subtly Devastating Drama

    Our increasingly graphic culture has often made us expect, and sometimes uncomfortably desire, more explicit content in films, even those dealing with sexual harassment in the MeToo era. Writer-director Kitty Green’s quiet, new drama, “The Assistant,” refuses to succumb to that proclivity.But while the filmmaker rightly understands that shock value isn’t the only way to tell a visceral story, its central performance by Julia Garner is what makes the film most interesting to watch.Clenching a wonderful actress is always a major coup for any director, especially for a debut dramatic feature. It perhaps says that the material was strong enough to attract a high-caliber star, and that there was a certain level of comfort and trust between Green and Garner. That’s definitely necessary for a film that explores the very sensitive matter of what it’s like to be a low-ranking female professional in an office dominated by powerful, lascivious men.Watch Video: Watch 'The Assistant' Trailer Based on Experiences of Former Harvey Weinstein Employees“The Assistant” isn’t so much about the toxic men that consume coveted spaces in the entertainment industry — the high-powered agents, producers, etc. — though it’s clear that is from where its tension derives. Rather, it follows a day in the life of its titular subject, Jane (Garner), an assistant for said powerful men, from the moment she wakes up (before dawn) to the time she turns off the lights in the office (late at night).The camera trails Jane as she executes her menial tasks that, based on what’s widely known about the duties of Hollywood assistants, is true to real life: preparing the coffee, scheduling and rescheduling flights, liaising between the hot-headed boss man and his suspicious wife on the phone. The usual.In fact, the first half of the film can be pretty tedious to watch: We are only watching Jane work. Green’s camera angles, often peering down at her from overhead as she grabs coffee mugs or stares blankly at her email, merely highlight the mundanity of her job, which could really be any assistant position. There’s nothing particularly distinctive about what we’re seeing in this first act.Also Read: Inside Harvey Weinstein Trial Jury Selection and Why Neither Side Wanted Gigi HadidEven the men that surround Jane are nebulous. Jon Orsini and Noah Robbins (“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”) also play assistants in Jane’s office, and they’re each credited simply as “Male Assistant.” Essentially, they’re the guys who are unfazed by, and sometimes even participating in, the misogynistic culture of the environment, only swooping in to help their female counterpart craft the routine apology email to her boss for stepping a half-inch out of line.In “The Assistant,” there is nary a raised voice or harsh tone. We never even see Jane’s boss on screen. It’s easy to suggest that Green allows the audience to anticipate something popping off at any moment, considering the culture the film is depicting, but it is actually Garner’s subtle yet palpable dread throughout her performance — characterized by her shaky voice and the way she flits around — that builds stress and discomfort. That’s further enhanced by Dani Broom-Peltz’s effectively claustrophobic set decoration, which captures everything from the dull office lighting to the colorless walls.Also Read: A Harvey Weinstein Accuser Speaks Out: Why Aren't Silence Breakers Getting Hired? (Guest Blog)What Green is really drawing the audience’s attention toward is the culture of complicity — the habitual nature of faceless male execs luring novice young female professionals to five-star hotels for “unknown” reasons, to the men of all ranks joking and taking pride in this behavior, and to the remaining workers like Jane who are hunkered down at their desks just desperate to stay unnoticed. There’s rarely an intimidating element in the whole film; the story just is.While that’s a necessary function to accurately express what it’s like to work in this kind of environment, I’d be lying if I didn’t say that when a fearful Jane decides to visit Human Resources to report the behavior, my attention was finally elevated. That’s partly because it’s well known that in any industry, the department is there to protect the company, not the employee, and watching someone like Jane, who’s only been on the job for two months, attempt to blow the lid off of what’s going on comes with an indescribable anxiety.It’s the note that the audience is waiting for the entire film, and Garner (along with Matthew Macfadyen, who plays the HR rep) nails it. It’s uncomfortable, horrific, and deeply sad. While “The Assistant” more than tries the audience’s patience, often times only succeeding at creating a bleak diary of the day’s events, this moment makes it actually tremble.Obviously there is plenty of unambiguous reflection and plenty of movies (for example, “Bombshell”) about the lewd acts of men in power, but what’s often missing in the conversation is how someone like Jane, a woman who’s alone and seen as the lowest end of the totem pole, navigates what’s happening around her. While Jane doesn’t directly experience rape or sexual harassment, “The Assistant” shines a light on how the culture of acceptance that enables such crimes erodes the ambition, safety and souls of dutiful young women like her who are all but invisible. It’s a devastating realization, making the film sneakily impactful.Read original story ‘The Assistant’ Film Review: Julia Garner Navigates Toxic Work Culture in Subtly Devastating Drama At TheWrap

  • Where Are the Latinos at Sundance – and How Can Hollywood Really Help? | PRO Insight
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    Where Are the Latinos at Sundance – and How Can Hollywood Really Help? | PRO Insight

    A year ago at the Sundance Film Festival, a group of Latinx industry execs kept asking each other the same question: Where are the Latinos?With only a few movies at the festival by U.S.-born Latinos and the lack of our voices represented in the stories being told, we realized how little progress we’ve made in Hollywood. We vented our frustration on panels and on social media, but by the end of the festival, it was clear that we had to do more than just complain if we really wanted to help our community move forward.A year later, LA Collab was born: In partnership with Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, we launched a collective impact effort with the support of more than 60 allies and partners to double by 2030 the representation of Latinos in Hollywood, both in front and behind the camera. We can’t do this alone. Meaningful progress will only come if our non-Latino friends and allies in the industry partner and work together to help us meet this long overdue goal.  Most were surprised to learn that for the past dozen years, Latino representation in film averaged only 3%, when data has shown we are about 25% of the box office and almost 20% of the U.S. population. This is a crisis, and Hollywood has pledged to show up for us.Also Read: Lost City of Gold: How Hollywood Can Win Latinx AudiencesI often wonder how it’s possible that Latinos continue to remain so invisible even when we are the largest ethnic group in the nation, as well as one of the fastest growing, and are such a significant driver of economic growth and consumer spending in America.In my heart, I know that no one in Hollywood wakes up asking themselves, “How do we lower Latino representation today?“ But sadly, our numbers have been declining every single year. The silver lining? The bar is so low, we have nowhere to go but up.It’s baffling that Eva Longoria will be the first-ever U.S.-born Latina in history to direct a major motion picture, “Flamin’ Hot,” a biopic of the entrepreneurial journey of Richard Montanez, inventor of Spicy Flamin’ Hot Cheetos. Patricia Riggen — who directed “Under the Same Moon,” “The 33” and “Miracles From Heaven” — is the only foreign-born Latina to have directed a major Hollywood movie.Latino representation in television is just as dismal. Latino showrunners average only 1% in Hollywood, according to a new study by the Latino Donor Collaborative. Who gets to tell our stories matters because too often when our stories are told by someone who doesn’t understand the nuances of what it means to be Latino, we usually end up playing the same stereotypes over and over again.It seems lost among Hollywood executives that today Latinas, along with African American women, are launching and growing their companies at a higher rate than anyone else in America. However, they are also the ones who get the least amount of funding to start or grow their companies.Hollywood plays a role in this disparity: Having Latinas more often represented as successful businesswomen in TV and film would go a long way in addressing the unconscious bias of investors, whose networks may not include ambitious Latina entrepreneurs.Latinos are not in positions of power in Hollywood to be able to greenlight our own authentic stories and take chances on new talent and voices. There are currently zero Latinos heading up any of the major English-language networks, studios or streaming platforms. That’s why I have high hopes for Ozzie Areu and his new Areu Bros. Studios, which was specifically created to super-serve English-dominant U.S. Latino creators and audiences.Another handicap we have as a community is that many of us have been raised to believe that being good Americans means always being grateful for whatever we are given. So the message we ultimately end up sending Hollywood is that we will show up and over-index in buying tickets and streaming movies even if we are not onscreen, even if our stories are not told, or even worse — even if we are negatively portrayed. What the gatekeepers, therefore, conclude:  “If it’s not broken, don’t fix it.”It might not be broken today, but this has a deep psychological impact on our children, who grow up feeling not fully belonging, as Hollywood does not validate their presence as important enough to be included. Consider that today one out of every two children born in California and New York are Latino — and one out of every four in the rest of the country, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.The Latino Gen-Alpha generation (10 years old and younger) in our country are the new mainstream majority, and we need this generation to thrive in every way, as our economic future will depend on them.We are encouraged with Hollywood’s response to partner with our community in LA Collab, as the initiative has been embraced by not only some of the most prominent names in Hollywood and our own advocacy community leaders, but also from thousands of everyday people wanting to contribute pro bono with their time, their mentorship, partnerships, funding or industry connections.In Hollywood, and in life, access is everything. Even when talent might be distributed equally, we know opportunities are not. So when it comes to diversity, equity and inclusion this should not fall on the shoulders of the under-represented, but on all of us — especially the privileged ones who can open doors and give access.This week, Sundance 2020 kicks off with six films from U.S.-born Latinos (3 of them playing in the competition), as well as the launch of the first ever Latinx House, a place to build community and a sense of belonging at the festival. I am happy, grateful and optimistic for the positive change we can make for Hollywood and for America, together. What a difference a year makes.To join our growing number of supporters and partners go to LACollab.org and learn more about how together we can be part of the solution.Read original story Where Are the Latinos at Sundance – and How Can Hollywood Really Help? | PRO Insight At TheWrap

  • This USA Network Show Gets the Largest DVR Lift Across All of TV
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    This USA Network Show Gets the Largest DVR Lift Across All of TV

    Don’t tread on “Treadstone.” The USA Network thriller series based on the Jason Bourne film franchise has experienced the largest delayed-viewing lift of any TV series this season. According to Nielsen’s Live + Same Day ratings, the 10 episodes of “Treadstone” Season 1, which concluded last month, have averaged a modest 501,000 total viewers. But with 72 hours of (mostly) DVR viewing factored in, that number jumps to a much better 1.337 million, a whopping +167% lift. That is the largest percentage growth among television’s Top 600 primetime series thus far this season, which started on Sept. 23, 2019. We currently have Live + 3 Day data through Jan. 12, 2020. Just behind Tim Kring’s “Treadstone” in the three-day-viewing-lift rankings is FXX’s “Always Sunny in Philadelphia” (+148%), then truTV’s “Adam Ruins Everything” (+147%). FX dramas “American Horror Story” and “Mayans M.C.” round out the Top 5, both with +131% lifts in the Live + 3 Day viewership metric. Also Read: Ratings: 'Station 19'-'Grey's Anatomy' Crossover Dominates Thursday Six other television shows in the Top 600 fully double or more than double their respective Live + Same Day viewership: HBO’s “Ballers” (+122%), truTV’s “Impractical Jokers” (+117%), MTV’s “Ex on the Beach”...Read original story This USA Network Show Gets the Largest DVR Lift Across All of TV At TheWrap

  • Winter TV 2020: Premiere Dates for New and Returning Shows (Photos)
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    Winter TV 2020: Premiere Dates for New and Returning Shows (Photos)

    Winter is here and with it, naturally, comes the Winter TV season. In honor of the return of the colder months and their small-screen offerings, TheWrap has rounded up the premiere dates for not just the new and returning shows on Fox, ABC, NBC, CBS and The CW, but also the ones for the eagerly anticipated series hitting cable channels and streaming services this winter. Click through our gallery to find out when your favorite shows will be back and when your possible new favorites will debut.Series:  “Say Yes to the Dress: America”  Net:   TLC   Premiere Date:  Saturday, Jan. 4   Time: 8 p.m.Series:  “Sister Wives”  Net:  TLC   Premiere Date:  Sunday, Jan. 5   Time: 8 p.m.Series:  “America’s Got Talent: The Champions”  Net:  NBC   Premiere Date:  Monday, Jan. 6   Time: 8 p.m.Series:  “The Bachelor”  Net: ABC   Premiere Date:  Monday, Jan. 6   Time: 8 p.m.Series:  “Manifest”  Net: NBC    Premiere Date:  Monday, Jan. 6   Time: 10 p.m.Series:  “Ellen’s Game of Games”  Net:  NBC   Premiere Date:   Tuesday, Jan. 7   Time: 8 p.m.Series:  “My Big Fat Fabulous Life”  Net:  TLC   Premiere Date: Tuesday, Jan. 7    Time: 8 p.m.Series:  “Gordon Ramsay’s 24 Hours to Hell and Back”  Net: Fox    Premiere Date:  Tuesday, Jan. 7   Time: 9 p.m.Series: “The Haves and the Have Nots”   Net:   OWN   Premiere Date:   Tuesday, Jan. 7  Time: 9 p.m.Series: “Schitt’s Creek”   Net:  Pop TV   Premiere Date:  Tuesday, Jan. 7   Time: 9 p.m.Series: “Vanderpump Rules”   Net: Bravo    Premiere Date: Tuesday, Jan. 7    Time: 9 p.m.Series:  “FBI: Most Wanted”  Net: CBS    Premiere Date:  Tuesday, Jan. 7   Time: 10 p.m.Series:  “Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist”  Net:  NBC   Premiere Date:  Tuesday, Jan. 7   Time: 10 p.m.Series:  “Undercover Boss”  Net: CBS    Premiere Date:  Wednesday, Jan. 8   Time: 8 p.m.Series: “Criminal Minds”   Net: CBS    Premiere Date: Wednesday, Jan. 8    Time: 9 p.m.Series:  “America’s Top Dog”  Net: A&E    Premiere Date:  Wednesday, Jan. 8   Time: 9 p.m.Series:  “Party of Five”  Net:  Freeform   Premiere Date:  Wednesday, Jan. 8    Time: 9 p.m.Series:  “Very Cavallari”  Net:  E!   Premiere Date:  Thursday, Jan. 9  Time: 9 p.m.Series:  “Lincoln Rhyme: Hunt for the Bone Collector”  Net: NBC    Premiere Date: Friday, Jan. 10    Time: 8 p.m.Series: “The Outsider”   Net:  HBO   Premiere Date:  Sunday, Jan. 12   Time:  9 p.m.Series: “The New Pope”   Net:  HBO   Premiere Date:  Monday, Jan. 13   Time:  9 p.m.Series: “68 Whiskey”   Net:  Paramount Network   Premiere Date:  Wednesday, Jan. 15   Time:  10 p.m.Series: “Listing Impossible”   Net:  CNBC   Premiere Date:  Wednesday, Jan. 15   Time:  10 p.m.Series:  “Grown-ish”  Net:  Freeform  Premiere Date:  Thursday, Jan. 16   Time: 8 p.m.Series:  “Everything’s Gonna Be Okay”  Net:  Freeform   Premiere Date:  Thursday, Jan. 16  Time: 8:30 p.m.Series:  “Sex Education”  Net:  Netflix  Premiere Date:  Friday, Jan. 17   Time: N/ASeries:  “9-1-1: Lone Star”  Net:  Fox   Premiere Date:  Sunday, Jan. 19   Time: 10 p.m.Series:  “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow”  Net: The CW    Premiere Date:  Tuesday, Jan. 21   Time: 9 p.m.Series:  “Awkwafina Is Nora From Queens”  Net: Comedy Central   Premiere Date:  Wednesday, Jan. 22   Time: 10:30 p.m.Series:  “Project Blue Book”  Net: History Channel    Premiere Date:  Tuesday, Jan. 21   Time: 10 p.m.Series:  “Star Trek: Picard”  Net:  CBS All Access   Premiere Date: Thursday, Jan. 23    Time: N/ASeries:  “Station 19”  Net: ABC    Premiere Date:  Thursday, Jan. 23   Time: 8 p.m.Series:  “Outmatched”  Net: Fox    Premiere Date: Thursday, Jan. 23    Time: 8:30 p.m.Series:  “The Bold Type”  Net: Freeform    Premiere Date:  Thursday, Jan. 23   Time: 9 p.m.Series:  “Shrill”  Net:  Hulu   Premiere Date:  Friday, Jan. 24   Time: N/ASeries:  “Chilling Adventures of Sabrina”  Net:  Netflix   Premiere Date:  Friday, Jan. 24   Time: N/ASeries:  “The Ranch”  Net:  Netflix   Premiere Date:  Friday, Jan. 24   Time: N/ASeries:  “Miracle Workers: Dark Ages”  Net:  TBS   Premiere Date:  Tuesday, Jan. 28   Time: 10:30 p.m.Series:  “BoJack Horseman”  Net: Netflix    Premiere Date:  Friday, Jan. 31   Time: N/ASeries:  “The Masked Singer”  Net:  Fox   Premiere Date:  Sunday, Feb. 2   Time: 10:30 p.m.Series: “Lego Masters”   Net:  Fox   Premiere Date:  Wednesday, Feb. 5   Time: 9 p.m.Series: “Katy Keene”   Net:  The CW   Premiere Date:  Thursday, Feb. 6   Time: 8 p.m.Series: “Brooklyn Nine-Nine”   Net:  NBC   Premiere Date:  Thursday, Feb. 6   Time: 8 p.m.Series: “Indebted”   Net:  NBC   Premiere Date:  Thursday, Feb. 6   Time: 9:30 p.m.Series: “Tommy”   Net:  CBS   Premiere Date:  Thursday, Feb. 6  Time: 10 p.m.Series:  “Locke & Key”  Net:  Netflix   Premiere Date:  Friday, Feb. 7   Time: N/ASeries:  “MacGyver”  Net:  CBS   Premiere Date:  Friday, Feb. 7   Time: 8 p.m.Series:  “Homeland”  Net: Showtime    Premiere Date: Sunday, Feb. 9    Time: 9 p.m.Series:  “Kidding”  Net:  Showtime   Premiere Date:  Sunday, Feb. 9   Time: 10 p.m.Series:  “For Life”  Net:  ABC   Premiere Date:  Tuesday, Feb. 11   Time: 10 p.m.Series: “Survivor”  Net: CBS   Premiere Date: Wednesday, Feb. 12   Time: 8 p.m.Series: “High Fidelity”  Net:  Hulu  Premiere Date:  Friday, Feb. 14  Time: N/ASeries: “Outlander”  Net:  Starz  Premiere Date:  Sunday, Feb. 16  Time: 8 p.m.Series: “American Idol”  Net: ABC  Premiere Date:  Sunday, Feb. 16  Time: 8 p.m.Series: “Duncanville”  Net: Fox  Premiere Date:  Sunday, Feb. 16  Time: 8:30 p.m.Series: “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition”  Net: HGTV  Premiere Date:  Sunday, Feb. 16  Time: 9 p.m.Series: “Good Girls”  Net:  NBC  Premiere Date: Sunday, Feb. 16   Time: 10 p.m.Series: “Last Week Tonight With John Oliver”  Net: HBO   Premiere Date: Sunday, Feb. 16   Time: 11 p.m.Series: “Better Call Saul”  Net: AMC   Premiere Date: Sunday, Feb. 23   Time: 10 p.m.Series:  “The Voice”  Net:  NBC  Premiere Date: Monday, Feb. 24   Time: 8 p.m.Series:  “Dispatches From Elsewhere”  Net:  AMC  Premiere Date: Sunday, March 1   Time: 10 p.m.Series:  “Cosmos: Possible Worlds”  Net:  Nat Geo  Premiere Date:  Monday, March 9  Time: 9 p.m.Series:  “Roswell, New Mexico”  Net:  The CW  Premiere Date:  Monday, March 16  Time: 9 p.m.Read original story Winter TV 2020: Premiere Dates for New and Returning Shows (Photos) At TheWrap

  • ‘Terminator: Dark Fate’ – Let’s Talk About What Happened With John Connor
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    ‘Terminator: Dark Fate’ – Let’s Talk About What Happened With John Connor

    (Spoilers ahead for “Terminator: Dark Fate”)The “Terminator” franchise is a weird thing because the powers-that-be behind these movies have made repeated attempts to soft reboot the series over the past decade. In Hollywood, parlance, a “reboot” is a fresh start — with a “hard” reboot meaning the franchise begins again from scratch, and a “soft” reboot involving an attempt to sort of refresh the series while still acknowledging the previous films. “Salvation” tried to reboot the series into being about the future post-apocalyptic war against the machines. “Genisys” tried to recontextualize the battle through time in order to dramatically alter the franchise dynamic. And “Terminator: Dark Fate” tries to just do it again with new people and also the old people — not unlike what “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” did.Part of what “Dark Fate” does to reset things involves getting rid of some of the franchise’s existing x-factors. One of those casualties is John Connor, the hero fated to lead the remnants of humanity in a successful uprising against Skynet after Skynet nukes the world on Judgment Day.John has been a key figure in all five of the previous “Terminator” movies — including the first one, even though he didn’t actually appear in that movie. But in “Dark Fate,” he’s killed off at the very beginning of the movie, the victim of yet another Arnold Schwarzenegger terminator, as his mother, Sarah (Linda Hamilton), looks on.Also Read: 6 Major Ideas 'Terminator: Dark Fate' Copied From Previous 'Terminator' MoviesIt’s a pretty surprising turn of events for those of us who have followed this franchise for so long, but not as catastrophic as it may initially seem. Let’s break down John Connor’s murder within the context of the new direction that “Dark Fate” is trying to take us.The big picture of this new film is that Skynet really was defeated back in “T2,” but a different AI rose up, caused a Judgment Day of its own at some point in the future, and the same time loop from the first movie happens again but with different people.The symmetry between the whole time loop in “The Terminator” and “T2” is thorough. Not only will a different AI rise up to destroy the world, but a different hero — Dani Ramos (Natalia Reyes), in this case — will rise up to save it. See, no worries.Also Read: 'Terminator: Dark Fate' Film Review: Linda Hamilton Is Back, and So Is the Franchise's MojoWhile the creatives behind “Dark Fate” apparently intended for the film to maintain continuity with only the first two movies and disregard the other films, novels, the TV show and everything else, this approach is spiritually in line with the many other stories that fleshed out the “Terminator” universe and granted at least semi-coherence to its cycle of time. It’s as if, as the T-800 declares in “Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines,” that “Judgment Day is inevitable.” Or, as Skynet itself declares in the novel “T2: Rising Storm”: “It seems there is a certain elasticity to history; time travel can bend the fabric, but it seeks to spring back.”The idea there is that all this time travel may change the past, but history will eventually correct itself. So machines will always destroy civilization, and people will always win in the end. I don’t know that “Dark Fate” is really pushing this idea in the same terms as those other stories, but it certainly works out the same as presented in the movie. In that sense, it probably didn’t ever actually matter if John Conner survived in the past — no matter what, somebody would have led humanity to victory in the end.Read original story ‘Terminator: Dark Fate’ – Let’s Talk About What Happened With John Connor At TheWrap

  • ‘Anaconda’ Reboot at Sony Taps ‘Snow White and the Huntsman’ Scribe
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    ‘Anaconda’ Reboot at Sony Taps ‘Snow White and the Huntsman’ Scribe

    Sony is digging into its vault to revive the 1997 cult creature feature “Anaconda” starring Jennifer Lopez, Ice Cube and Jon Voight.The studio has tapped “Snow White and the Huntsman” and “Tomb Raider” screenwriter Evan Daugherty to write the script.The film isn’t expected to be a sequel or a straight remake, but instead a reimagining of the film, which grossed roughly $137 million at the box office world wide and was disparaged by critics and audiences alike at the time.Also Read: 'Hustlers' Real-Life Stripper Sues STX for $40 Million Over Jennifer Lopez's Portrayal“Anaconda,” which also starred Eric Stoltz, Owen Wilson, Kari Wuhrer and Jonathan Hyde, received a 40% critics score and a 42% audience score on review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes.The original followed a documentary film crew on their trek through the Amazon when they come across a stranded, soon to be revealed obsessed, hunter (Voight) looking for a legendary — an enormous — snake, which gives off real white whale kind of vibes. The hunter then derails the crew’s expedition for his own quest, dragging the filmmakers along to contend with a murderous madman and face the giant water boa hell bent on killing them.The project is in very early development stages, at this point, and has no producer or director attached.Daugherty is repped by Verve, management firm Alibi, and law outfit McKuin Frankel.The Hollywood Reporter first reported the news.Read original story ‘Anaconda’ Reboot at Sony Taps ‘Snow White and the Huntsman’ Scribe At TheWrap