• Marvel TV to Cut Staff, End Future Development as Unit Moves Under Kevin Feige and Marvel Studios
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    The Wrap

    Marvel TV to Cut Staff, End Future Development as Unit Moves Under Kevin Feige and Marvel Studios

    Marvel TV is winding down. Two months after the division was moved under Kevin Feige and Marvel Studios, the TV-arm of Marvel is ending all of its development plans.Marvel TV will complete all of its projects that are currently in development, which include the final season of ABC’s “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” that will air next summer, but will not continue beyond that. Those also include the four animated series that are currently in development at Hulu, as well as the live-action “Helstrom.”The integration of Marvel TV under Marvel Studios will include layoffs as a result, both in the immediate future and long term, once development on all current Marvel TV shows is completed. The move effectively shutters the division as it will be absorbed by Marvel Studios — though the Marvel TV name may still continue.Also Read: Kevin Feige Named Chief Creative Officer of MarvelMarvel TV staff, including Karim Zreik, senior vice president of current programming and production and members of his team, will join the Marvel Studios group. Zreik will head up current projects in production. Jeph Loeb, who is exiting as head of Marvel TV in the coming weeks, will remain available during the transition. Marvel Studios is planning its own foray into the small screen with eight different shows for Disney+. Those include “The Falcon and The Winter Soldier,” “WandaVision,” “Loki” and “Hawkeye,” which all star characters from the hugely popular Marvel Cinematic Universe.Earlier this year, Marvel TV signed a large, multi-series animated deal with Hulu, and then a separate agreement with the Disney-owned streamer for a pair of live-action series in “Helstrom” and “Ghost Rider.” Plans for “Ghost Rider” were eventually shelved. The third and final season of “The Runaways” premieres on Hulu this Friday.Loeb spearheaded the initial expansion of the MCU into television with “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” and “Agent Carter.” Marvel TV had an expansive slate on Netflix that included “Daredevil,” “Jessica Jones,” “Iron Fist,” “Luke Cage,” “The Punisher” and the team-up series, “The Defenders.” But with Disney launching its own streaming competitor, the two sides ended their four-year creative partnership earlier this year.Read original story Marvel TV to Cut Staff, End Future Development as Unit Moves Under Kevin Feige and Marvel Studios At TheWrap

  • Karen Gillan praises James Gunn's 'wonderful' Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 script (exclusive)
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    Tom Beasley

    Karen Gillan praises James Gunn's 'wonderful' Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 script (exclusive)

    The Scottish star said it wouldn't have felt right to finish the 'Guardians of the Galaxy' trilogy without James Gunn at the helm.

  • 'Black Panther' star Chadwick Boseman almost played a totally different Marvel hero
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    Tom Beasley

    'Black Panther' star Chadwick Boseman almost played a totally different Marvel hero

    Boseman wasn't always in the frame to play the King of Wakanda. He had another MCU hero in mind.

  • Release dates for five new Marvel movies revealed
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    Gregory Wakeman

    Release dates for five new Marvel movies revealed

    Marvel had revealed the release dates for five upcoming installments to the MCU, but which movies will fill the slots?

  • Mark Ruffalo updates on the status of Hulk in the Marvel Cinematic Universe
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    Gregory Wakeman

    Mark Ruffalo updates on the status of Hulk in the Marvel Cinematic Universe

    Mark Ruffalo talks the Hulk, and provides an update on his potential return to the Marvel Cinematic Universe

  • 'Le Mans 66': James Mangold says Scorsese 'generalised' on Marvel, gives X-23 update (exclusive)
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    Tom Beasley

    'Le Mans 66': James Mangold says Scorsese 'generalised' on Marvel, gives X-23 update (exclusive)

    The director of 'Le Mans 66' and 'Logan' shares some of Martin Scorsese's comic book views, but thinks Marvel has become an easy target.

  • Adam McKay thinks Martin Scorsese needs to watch 'Thor: Ragnarok'
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    Gregory Wakeman

    Adam McKay thinks Martin Scorsese needs to watch 'Thor: Ragnarok'

    Adam McKay was clearly disappointed by Martin Scorsese's Marvel comments, but he still has some advice for the legendary director.

  • Chadwick Boseman questions the timing of Martin Scorsese’s Marvel comments
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    Gregory Wakeman

    Chadwick Boseman questions the timing of Martin Scorsese’s Marvel comments

    Chadwick Boseman has weighed into Martin Scorsese's comments on the Marvel Cinematic Universe, questioning the timing of his remarks.

  • Marvel fans will need to watch Disney+ to understand MCU, insists Kevin Feige
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    Gregory Wakeman

    Marvel fans will need to watch Disney+ to understand MCU, insists Kevin Feige

    Kevin Feige has revealed that MCU fans will need to watch every new series that debuts on Disney+ in order to fully understand its future films.

  • Marvel fans have spotted a 'Back to the Future 2' easter egg in 'Avengers: Endgame'
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    Tom Beasley

    Marvel fans have spotted a 'Back to the Future 2' easter egg in 'Avengers: Endgame'

    The Russo Brothers slipped a nod to another time travel classic into the epic finale of 'Avengers: Endgame'.

  • DisneyLife will be rebranded as Disney+ in the UK
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    Tom Butler

    DisneyLife will be rebranded as Disney+ in the UK

    DisneyLife launched in the UK back in 2015, and is still open to UK consumers until Disney+ launches here next year.

  • Disney unveils UK release date for streaming platform Disney+
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    Ben Arnold

    Disney unveils UK release date for streaming platform Disney+

    Disney+, the new streaming platform from Disney, will launch in the UK on March 31, 2020, the studio has confirmed.

  • Spider-Man is one of the 'absolute motherf***ing pornstars' of the MCU, says Ben Mendelsohn
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    Tom Beasley

    Spider-Man is one of the 'absolute motherf***ing pornstars' of the MCU, says Ben Mendelsohn

    Ben Mendelsohn said 'cooler heads prevailed' in the dispute over Spider-Man's future in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

  • Marvel's 'Eternals' Halts Production After Unidentified Object Found on Set
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    Entertainment Tonight

    Marvel's 'Eternals' Halts Production After Unidentified Object Found on Set

    ET has learned that the object was found in an area where the movie’s second unit was filming in Spain’s Canary Islands.

  • Martin Scorsese Expands on Marvel Criticism in New York Times Op-Ed: ‘Nothing Is at Risk’
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    The Wrap

    Martin Scorsese Expands on Marvel Criticism in New York Times Op-Ed: ‘Nothing Is at Risk’

    Martin Scorsese wants you to know that he didn’t mean to insult Marvel movies when he said they weren’t cinema… but their cultural domination still worries him.Since the filmmaker was asked by Empire Magazine about his thoughts on superhero films in October, a debate has raged on over the MCU’s artistic merits on social media and beyond. And in a new op-ed in The New York Times, Scorsese clarified his thoughts and discussed how in his view Marvel and DC’s blockbusters are a far cry from the auteur-driven work that inspired him to become a director and defined the era in which he came up.“For me, for the filmmakers I came to love and respect, for my friends who started making movies around the same time that I did, cinema was about revelation — aesthetic, emotional and spiritual revelation,” Scorsese explained. “It was about characters — the complexity of people and their contradictory and sometimes paradoxical natures, the way they can hurt one another and love one another and suddenly come face to face with themselves.”Also Read: Martin Scorsese Expands on Marvel Movies Comments: 'Theme Park Films' Are 'a New Art Form'“Many franchise films are made by people of considerable talent and artistry. You can see it on the screen. […] I know that if I were younger, if I’d come of age at a later time, I might have been excited by these pictures and maybe even wanted to make one myself. But I grew up when I did and I developed a sense of movies — of what they were and what they could be — that was as far from the Marvel universe as we on Earth are from Alpha Centauri.”Scorsese acknowledged that superhero films are capable of exhibiting many of the qualities that he values in cinema. But his problem with them is that they, and modern film franchises as a whole, are “market-researched, audience-tested, vetted, modified, revetted and remodified until they’re ready for consumption.”Also Read: Jon Favreau on Scorsese and Coppola's Marvel Criticism: 'They Can Express Whatever Opinion They Like'Even if “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is radically different from “Captain America: The First Avenger,” Scorsese believes such films are “sequels in name but remakes in spirit,” because “everything in them is officially sanctioned because it can’t really be any other way.”By comparison, the filmmaker says that when he sees a film by Spike Lee, Kathryn Bigelow, or any of the acclaimed directors that have come after him, he knows they will take him somewhere new even if they bear similar cinematic styles.“What’s not there [in superhero films] is revelation, mystery or genuine emotional danger. Nothing is at risk. The pictures are made to satisfy a specific set of demands, and they are designed as variations on a finite number of themes.”But even if there’s a fundamental difference in filmmaking philosophy between Martin Scorsese and Marvel Studios, Scorsese’s biggest fear is that the MCU and franchises like it are taking up too much pop culture space and not allowing other kinds of films to stand out. Superhero movies combined to gross over $3 billion in North America in 2018, accounting for one-fourth of all domestic box office revenue last year.Also Read: Francis Ford Coppola Doubles Down on Scorsese's Diss of Marvel Films: 'Despicable'Scorsese said he is also worried that Hollywood’s franchise arms race is making it harder for original films to get the attention they deserve from moviegoers, creating a cycle in which audiences only show up for the biggest blockbusters because studios have conditioned them to only buy tickets for those kinds of films, leading studios in turn to chase after the next big franchise to the expense of everything else.“…the movie business has changed on all fronts. But the most ominous change has happened stealthily and under cover of night: the gradual but steady elimination of risk. Many films today are perfect products manufactured for immediate consumption. Many of them are well made by teams of talented individuals. All the same, they lack something essential to cinema: the unifying vision of an individual artist. Because, of course, the individual artist is the riskiest factor of all.”“The situation, sadly, is that we now have two separate fields: There’s worldwide audiovisual entertainment, and there’s cinema. They still overlap from time to time, but that’s becoming increasingly rare. And I fear that the financial dominance of one is being used to marginalize and even belittle the existence of the other.”Martin Scorsese’s latest film, “The Irishman” screens in select theaters this weekend and will stream on Netflix on November 27.Read original story Martin Scorsese Expands on Marvel Criticism in New York Times Op-Ed: ‘Nothing Is at Risk’ At TheWrap

  • Will Taron Egerton be Marvel's next Wolverine? The 'Rocketman' star responds to rampant rumours
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    Kevin Polowy

    Will Taron Egerton be Marvel's next Wolverine? The 'Rocketman' star responds to rampant rumours

    If Taron Egerton is secretly in negotiations to play Wolverine in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, he's doing a good job hiding it.

  • Tom Hiddleston and Charlie Cox swap comic book characters for Halloween surprise
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    Tom Beasley

    Tom Hiddleston and Charlie Cox swap comic book characters for Halloween surprise

    Fans on Twitter declared that Tom Hiddleston and Charlie Cox 'won Halloween' with their costume swap.

  • Sony chairman says 'news got ahead' of Disney dispute over 'Spider-Man'
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    Tom Beasley

    Sony chairman says 'news got ahead' of Disney dispute over 'Spider-Man'

    Tom Rothman said the eventual 'Spider-Man' rights compromise is a 'win-win-win' for Sony, Disney and the fans.

  • Kevin Feige will always be involved with MCU despite developing 'Star Wars' movie
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    Gregory Wakeman

    Kevin Feige will always be involved with MCU despite developing 'Star Wars' movie

    Marvel executive producer Trinh Tran has confirmed that Kevin Feige will still be involved with MCU despite his recent promotions.

  • Martin Scorsese clarifies blockbuster 'theme park' comparison, backs streaming to give filmmakers opportunities
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    Tom Beasley

    Martin Scorsese clarifies blockbuster 'theme park' comparison, backs streaming to give filmmakers opportunities

    Martin Scorsese said that Marvel and other blockbusters represent a 'different cinema form'.

  • 'Hellboy' director Neil Marshall says comic book movies are 'pure cinema' (exclusive)
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    Tom Beasley

    'Hellboy' director Neil Marshall says comic book movies are 'pure cinema' (exclusive)

    The director of 'Hellboy' says it was wrong for Martin Scorsese to 'segregate' comic book movies away from the rest of cinema.

  • Bob Iger Compares ‘Black Panther’ to Scorsese and Coppola Films in Defense of Marvel Movies
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    The Wrap

    Bob Iger Compares ‘Black Panther’ to Scorsese and Coppola Films in Defense of Marvel Movies

    Disney CEO Bob Iger was the latest to leap to the defense of Marvel movies in the recent civil war among filmmakers over the blockbusters, pointing to Ryan Coogler’s Best Picture-nominated “Black Panther” as worthy as being called “cinema” as any film Martin Scorsese or Francis Ford Coppola have made.Iger got heated on the subject as part of the WSJ Tech Live event Tuesday night after both Scorsese, Coppola and a handful of other auteur filmmakers have criticized the movies, with Coppola most recently calling the films “despicable.”“I’m puzzled by it. If they want to bitch about movies it’s certainly their right. It seems so disrespectful to all the people who work on those films who are working just as hard as the people who are working on their films and are putting their creative souls on the line just like they are,” Iger said of filmmakers’ comments. “Are you telling me that Ryan Coogler making ‘Black Panther’ is doing something that somehow or another is less than anything Marty Scorsese or Francis Ford Coppola have ever done on any one of their movies? Come on.”Also Read: Jon Favreau on Scorsese and Coppola's Marvel Criticism: 'They Can Express Whatever Opinion They Like'Iger says he holds Coppola and Scorsese in “the highest regard,” but he took issue with Coppola’s characterization of the films as “despicable,” and that he’d only reserve that word “for someone who had committed mass murder.”“When Francis uses the words ‘those films are despicable,’ to whom is he talking? Is he talking to Kevin Feige who runs Marvel, or Taika Waititi who directs or Ryan Coogler who directs for us or Scarlett Johansson,” Iger said. “I don’t get what they’re criticizing us for when we’re making films that people are obviously enjoying going to because they’re doing so by the millions.”Scorsese recently doubled down on his comments when he said that Marvel movies were not cinema and compared them to “theme parks.” He ultimately said that Marvel’s films were “invading” movie theaters and replacing what young people’s idea of cinema is, even driving out smaller films and more human stories from the popular culture.Also Read: After Coppola Slam, James Gunn Defends Marvel Movies as Cinema (Again)Ken Loach, the British director behind “Kes” and the recent “Sorry We Missed You,” more specifically attacked the commercialism of Marvel films rather than their content specifically.“They’re made as commodities like hamburgers, and it’s not about communicating, and it’s not about sharing our imagination,” Loach told Sky News. “It’s about making a commodity which will make a profit for a big corporation – they’re a cynical exercise. They’re a market exercise, and it has nothing to do with the art of cinema. William Blake said, ‘When money is discussed, art is impossible.'”Iger however had a response for that as well, saying that there’s a mutual benefit in the success of the Marvel films and other blockbusters that allows movie theaters to exhibit movies that otherwise wouldn’t be as financially successful.Check out Iger’s full comments via WSJ.Read original story Bob Iger Compares ‘Black Panther’ to Scorsese and Coppola Films in Defense of Marvel Movies At TheWrap

  • Ken Loach criticises 'boring' superhero films: 'They're a cynical exercise'
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    Amy Johnson

    Ken Loach criticises 'boring' superhero films: 'They're a cynical exercise'

    The director has joined the ranks of those speaking out against the genre.

  • Taika Waititi confirms his character Korg will appear in 'Thor: Love and Thunder'
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    Hanna Flint

    Taika Waititi confirms his character Korg will appear in 'Thor: Love and Thunder'

    Your favourite Koran is back in business.

  • Disney Life to continue in the UK 'for some time' while we wait for Disney+
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    Ben Arnold

    Disney Life to continue in the UK 'for some time' while we wait for Disney+

    Those waiting for the announcement of when Disney+, the new Disney streaming platform, will be launching in the UK may be waiting a little while yet.