• 'Parasite’s' Bong Joon-Ho doesn't expect to land a Marvel movie, but enjoys them nonetheless
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    Gregory Wakeman

    'Parasite’s' Bong Joon-Ho doesn't expect to land a Marvel movie, but enjoys them nonetheless

    Bong Joon-Ho isn't interested in directing a Marvel film, but at least he likes him.

  • The most ambitious long takes in movie history
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    Tom Beasley

    The most ambitious long takes in movie history

    With Sam Mendes presenting '1917' as if it unfolds in a single take, what are some of the best examples of this trick in the history of Hollywood?

  • Rob Lowe Says His ‘Little Stupid Christmas Elephant Movie’ Got More Netflix Viewers Than ‘The Irishman’
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    The Wrap

    Rob Lowe Says His ‘Little Stupid Christmas Elephant Movie’ Got More Netflix Viewers Than ‘The Irishman’

    Rob Lowe said that his Netflix film, “Holiday in the Wild,” drew more viewers to the streaming platform than Martin Scorsese’s Oscar-contender “The Irishman.”“I just did a movie for Netflix that was the number one movie that they had,” Lowe said Monday during the Television Critics Association press tour in Pasadena, California, when he was asked if he preferred working on streaming shows instead of network TV. “A little stupid Christmas elephant movie and it beat — take that Martin Scorsese.”Lowe did not give any hard numbers on that — TheWrap has asked Netflix to verify Lowe’s claim — but “The Irishman,” Scorsese’s three-hour mob epic, drew 13.2 million viewers in its first five days, according to Nielsen. That average-minute audience is more than “El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie” (8.2 million) and less than “Bird Box” (16.9 million).Also Read: 'Masked Dancer': Fox Orders Competition Series Based on 'Ellen Show' Spoof of 'Masked Singer'The gangster film, which carries a runtime of three hours and 29 minutes, was released on the streaming service on Nov. 27. It opened in theaters on Nov. 1, but Netflix does not generally report box office numbers. Per Netflix’s Ted Sarandos, it was seen by more than 26 million accounts during its first week (Netflix counts a view once someone has watched 70% of a show or movie). “The Irishman” starred Robert DeNiro, Joe Pesci and Al Pacino is considered a favorite for major Oscar awards next month.“Holiday in the Wild” was released on Nov. 1 and co-starred “Sex and the City” alum Kristin Davis. Here is the logline for that film:To keep her spirits high when their son leaves for college, Manhattanite Kate Conrad (Davis) has booked a ‘second honeymoon’ with her husband. Instead of thanking her, he brings their relationship to a sudden end; jilted Kate proceeds to Africa for a solo safari. During a detour through Zambia, she helps her pilot, Derek Holliston (Lowe), rescue an orphaned baby elephant. They nurse him back to health at a local elephant orphanage, and Kate extends her stay through Christmastime. Far from the modern luxuries of home, Kate thrives amidst majestic animals and scenery. Her love for the new surroundings just might extend to the man who shared her journey.Read original story Rob Lowe Says His ‘Little Stupid Christmas Elephant Movie’ Got More Netflix Viewers Than ‘The Irishman’ At TheWrap

  • Martin Scorsese says streaming algorithms are ruining audiences
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    Gregory Wakeman

    Martin Scorsese says streaming algorithms are ruining audiences

    Martin Scorsese might have provoked the wrath of Netflix after criticising the impact of streaming algorithms

  • Martin Scorsese nearly quit filmmaking after ‘The Aviator’
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    Gregory Wakeman

    Martin Scorsese nearly quit filmmaking after ‘The Aviator’

    Martin Scorsese was so upset after working on The Aviator in 2004 that he almost quit Hollywood.

  • Terry Gilliam Trashes ‘Black Panther': ‘It’s Utter Bulls—‘
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    The Wrap

    Terry Gilliam Trashes ‘Black Panther': ‘It’s Utter Bulls—‘

    Terry Gilliam doesn’t like “Black Panther.” He really, really doesn’t like “Black Panther.”In an interview with IndieWire about his long-awaited film “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” Gilliam criticized the dominance of Marvel Studios in Hollywood, echoing comments made by fellow filmmakers Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola about fears that they are creating a monoculture of blockbusters. But specifically, he targeted Ryan Coogler’s Oscar-winning, Best Picture nominated film “Black Panther” for extra ire.“I hated ‘Black Panther.’ It makes me crazy. It gives young black kids the idea that this is something to believe in. Bulls—. It’s utter bulls—,” he said. “I think the people who made it have never been to Africa. They went and got some stylist for some African pattern fabrics and things. But I just I hated that movie, partly because the media were going on about the importance of bulls—.”Also Read: Martin Scorsese Expands on Marvel Movies Comments: 'Theme Park Films' Are 'a New Art Form'Gilliam, however, is incorrect about the “never been to Africa” part. Coogler traveled with several key members of his team to Africa to do research and aerial shots for the film. Production designer Hannah Beachler and costume designer Ruth Carter recounted in an interviews with TheWrap how Afrofuturist architecture from the continent and from the attire of tribes like the Masai were core influences when building the world of Wakanda. Both women won Oscars for their efforts.Like Scorsese and Coppola — the latter of whom called Marvel films “despicable” — Gilliam feels like the series is accelerating an arms race in Hollywood that prioritizes tentpole blockbusters and low-risk/high-reward microbudget horror films to the detriment of everything else.Also Read: Disney CEO Bob Iger and Martin Scorsese to Meet Over Marvel Comments“There isn’t room or money for a greater range of films. You make a film for over $150 million or less than $10 [million]. Where’s all this other stuff? It doesn’t exist anymore,” he said. “I make films where I’m trying to make people think. I mean, I try to entertain them enough that they don’t fall asleep on me, and they’re there to make you think and look at the world in a different way, hopefully, and consider possibilities. Those films don’t do that.”He went on: “Where’s the gravity, where’s real gravity? Because [in superhero movies,] everything is possible. It’s the limitations that make life interesting. Okay, so your suit burns up. So you get another suit because you’re Tony Stark. It’s not enough. They dominate so much.”If you’re in the anti-Marvel boat with Gilliam, you can check out “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” which is streaming on Crackle and available to rent digitally on Amazon. If not, you can always check out “Black Panther” on Netflix… and the rest of the MCU on Disney+.Read original story Terry Gilliam Trashes ‘Black Panther': ‘It’s Utter Bulls—‘ At TheWrap

  • Here’s how many people watched ‘The Irishman’ on Netflix
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    Gregory Wakeman

    Here’s how many people watched ‘The Irishman’ on Netflix

    The viewing figures for The Irishman have been released, and the gangster epic proved to be a huge hit with Netflix subscribers.

  • 'Motherless Brooklyn': Edward Norton says 'Fight Club' gave him 'confidence' his film can find audience
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    Tom Beasley

    'Motherless Brooklyn': Edward Norton says 'Fight Club' gave him 'confidence' his film can find audience

    The actor-director said it's harder than it used to be for films like 'Motherless Brooklyn' to do well at the multiplex.

  • National Board of Review Names ‘The Irishman’ the Year’s Best Film
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    The Wrap

    National Board of Review Names ‘The Irishman’ the Year’s Best Film

    The National Board of Review has named Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman” the best film of 2019. Scorsese and two of the film’s stars, Robert De Niro and Al Pacino, will also receive the organization’s inaugural Icon Award.The NBR’s Top 10 list consisted of “1917,” “Dolemite Is My Name,” “Ford v Ferrari,” “Jojo Rabbit,” “Knives Out,” “Marriage Story,” “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood,” “Richard Jewell,” “Uncut Gems” and “Waves.”Quentin Tarantino was named the year’s best director for “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood,” while Melina Matsoukas won the Best Directorial Debut award for “Queen & Slim.”Also Read: 'The Irishman' Re-Review: Does Martin Scorsese's Epic Feature Play Better on the Small Screen?Acting awards went to Adam Sandler for “Uncut Gems,” Renee Zellweger for “Judy,” Brad Pitt for “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood” and Kathy Bates for “Richard Jewell.” That latter film’s star, Paul Walter Hauser, won the Breakthrough Performance award.“Parasite” was named the year’s best foreign-language film, “Maiden” the best documentary and “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” the best animated feature.Presumed Oscar contenders missing from the NBR list included “The Two Popes,” “Little Women,” “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood,” “Joker” and “The Farewell” (which did appear on the list of best independent films), while the list gave a boost to “Dolemite Is My Name,” “Knives Out,” “Richard Jewell” and particularly Adam Sandler and “Uncut Gems.”Also Read: 'Marriage Story' Dominates Gotham Awards 2019: The Complete Winners ListThe organization’s love affair with Scorsese extended to the point where it put “Rolling Thunder: A Bob Dylan Film by Martin Scorsese” on its list of the year’s best documentaries, even though the film is a largely fictionalized chronicle that uses the documentary form to bend the truth.Last year, the NBR had only four of the eight Oscar Best Picture nominees on its Top 10 list, missing “BlacKkKlansman,” “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “The Favourite” and “Vice.”But it did match the Academy on “Black Panther,” “Roma” and “A Star Is Born” – and its choice for the year’s best film, “Green Book,” went on to win the Oscar for Best Picture. It was the first time in a decade, since “Slumdog Millionaire” in 2008, that the NBR had chosen the eventual Best Picture winner.Also Read: 'The Irishman' Film Review: Martin Scorsese's Gangster Epic Is Melancholic and BittersweetOver the last 10 years, a little over half of the films on the NBR list have ended up with Best Picture nominations. But only one NBR winner in the last 18 years, 2014’s “A Most Violent Year,” failed to land an Oscar nomination for Best Picture.While the National Board of Review is often mistakenly considered a critics’ organization, the group is made up of, in its own words, “knowledgeable film enthusiasts and professionals, academics, young filmmakers and students” in the New York area. Much of its relatively high profile comes from the fact that it is one of the first groups to pick the year’s best films. (The more prestigious New York Film Critics Circle will make its own picks on Wednesday, as will the American Film Institute.)The NBR was established in 1909 by theater owners protesting the New York mayor’s attempt to block the exhibition of motion pictures in the city. It has been picking the best films since 1930.The winners will be recognized at the NBR Awards Gala on Jan. 8, 2020, at Cipriani 42nd Street in New York City.The winners:Best Film: “The Irishman” Best Director: Quentin Tarantino, “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood” Best Actor: Adam Sandler, “Uncut Gems” Best Actress: Renée Zellweger, “Judy” Best Supporting Actor: Brad Pitt, “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood” Best Supporting Actress: Kathy Bates, “Richard Jewell” Best Original Screenplay: Josh Safdie, Benny Safdie, Ronald Bronstein, “Uncut Gems” Best Adapted Screenplay: Steven Zaillian, “The Irishman” Breakthrough Performance: Paul Walter Hauser, “Richard Jewell” Best Directorial Debut: Melina Matsoukas, “Queen & Slim” Best Animated Feature: “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” Best Foreign Language Film: “Parasite” Best Documentary: “Maiden” Best Ensemble: “Knives Out” Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography: Roger Deakins, “1917” NBR Icon Award: Martin Scorsese, Robert De Niro, Al Pacino NBR Freedom of Expression Award: “For Sama” NBR Freedom of Expression Award: “Just Mercy”Top 10 Films (in alphabetical order) “Dolemite is My Name” “Ford v Ferrari” “Jojo Rabbit” “Knives Out” “Marriage Story” “1917” “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood” “Richard Jewell” “Uncut Gems” “Waves”Top 5 Foreign Language Films (in alphabetical order) “Atlantics” “Invisible Life” “Pain and Glory” “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” “Transit”Top 5 Documentaries (in alphabetical order) “American Factory” “Apollo 11” “The Black Godfather” “Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese” “Wrestle”Top 10 Independent Films (in alphabetical order) “The Farewell” “Give Me Liberty” “A Hidden Life” “Judy” “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” “Midsommar” “The Nightingale” “The Peanut Butter Falcon” “The Souvenir” “Wild Rose”Read original story National Board of Review Names ‘The Irishman’ the Year’s Best Film At TheWrap

  • Martin Scorsese explains why 'The Irishman' wasn't made as a TV series
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    Gregory Wakeman

    Martin Scorsese explains why 'The Irishman' wasn't made as a TV series

    Martin Scorsese explains why The Irishman couldn't have been a television series.

  • 'The Irishman': The best way to watch the three and half hour gangster epic in bitesize chunks
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    Tom Beasley

    'The Irishman': The best way to watch the three and half hour gangster epic in bitesize chunks

    At three and a half hours long, watching 'The Irishman' on Netflix in one stint is a tough ask. Here's when it's safe to pause for a break.

  • 'Le Mans 66': James Mangold says Scorsese 'generalised' on Marvel, gives X-23 update (exclusive)
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    Tom Beasley

    'Le Mans 66': James Mangold says Scorsese 'generalised' on Marvel, gives X-23 update (exclusive)

    The director of 'Le Mans 66' and 'Logan' shares some of Martin Scorsese's comic book views, but thinks Marvel has become an easy target.

  • Anna Paquin fires back at lack of dialogue in 'The Irishman'
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    Ben Arnold

    Anna Paquin fires back at lack of dialogue in 'The Irishman'

    Anna Paquin has hit back over criticism about the amount of dialogue she has in new Martin Scorsese movie The Irishman.

  • Marvel boss Kevin Feige calls Scorsese's comments 'unfortunate'
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    Ben Arnold

    Marvel boss Kevin Feige calls Scorsese's comments 'unfortunate'

    Kevin Feige, the head of Marvel Studios, has finally broken his silence on Martin Scorsese's comments about the Marvel movie franchise.

  • Adam McKay thinks Martin Scorsese needs to watch 'Thor: Ragnarok'
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    Gregory Wakeman

    Adam McKay thinks Martin Scorsese needs to watch 'Thor: Ragnarok'

    Adam McKay was clearly disappointed by Martin Scorsese's Marvel comments, but he still has some advice for the legendary director.

  • Chadwick Boseman questions the timing of Martin Scorsese’s Marvel comments
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    Gregory Wakeman

    Chadwick Boseman questions the timing of Martin Scorsese’s Marvel comments

    Chadwick Boseman has weighed into Martin Scorsese's comments on the Marvel Cinematic Universe, questioning the timing of his remarks.

  • Martin Scorsese Expands on Marvel Criticism in New York Times Op-Ed: ‘Nothing Is at Risk’
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    The Wrap

    Martin Scorsese Expands on Marvel Criticism in New York Times Op-Ed: ‘Nothing Is at Risk’

    Martin Scorsese wants you to know that he didn’t mean to insult Marvel movies when he said they weren’t cinema… but their cultural domination still worries him.Since the filmmaker was asked by Empire Magazine about his thoughts on superhero films in October, a debate has raged on over the MCU’s artistic merits on social media and beyond. And in a new op-ed in The New York Times, Scorsese clarified his thoughts and discussed how in his view Marvel and DC’s blockbusters are a far cry from the auteur-driven work that inspired him to become a director and defined the era in which he came up.“For me, for the filmmakers I came to love and respect, for my friends who started making movies around the same time that I did, cinema was about revelation — aesthetic, emotional and spiritual revelation,” Scorsese explained. “It was about characters — the complexity of people and their contradictory and sometimes paradoxical natures, the way they can hurt one another and love one another and suddenly come face to face with themselves.”Also Read: Martin Scorsese Expands on Marvel Movies Comments: 'Theme Park Films' Are 'a New Art Form'“Many franchise films are made by people of considerable talent and artistry. You can see it on the screen. […] I know that if I were younger, if I’d come of age at a later time, I might have been excited by these pictures and maybe even wanted to make one myself. But I grew up when I did and I developed a sense of movies — of what they were and what they could be — that was as far from the Marvel universe as we on Earth are from Alpha Centauri.”Scorsese acknowledged that superhero films are capable of exhibiting many of the qualities that he values in cinema. But his problem with them is that they, and modern film franchises as a whole, are “market-researched, audience-tested, vetted, modified, revetted and remodified until they’re ready for consumption.”Also Read: Jon Favreau on Scorsese and Coppola's Marvel Criticism: 'They Can Express Whatever Opinion They Like'Even if “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is radically different from “Captain America: The First Avenger,” Scorsese believes such films are “sequels in name but remakes in spirit,” because “everything in them is officially sanctioned because it can’t really be any other way.”By comparison, the filmmaker says that when he sees a film by Spike Lee, Kathryn Bigelow, or any of the acclaimed directors that have come after him, he knows they will take him somewhere new even if they bear similar cinematic styles.“What’s not there [in superhero films] is revelation, mystery or genuine emotional danger. Nothing is at risk. The pictures are made to satisfy a specific set of demands, and they are designed as variations on a finite number of themes.”But even if there’s a fundamental difference in filmmaking philosophy between Martin Scorsese and Marvel Studios, Scorsese’s biggest fear is that the MCU and franchises like it are taking up too much pop culture space and not allowing other kinds of films to stand out. Superhero movies combined to gross over $3 billion in North America in 2018, accounting for one-fourth of all domestic box office revenue last year.Also Read: Francis Ford Coppola Doubles Down on Scorsese's Diss of Marvel Films: 'Despicable'Scorsese said he is also worried that Hollywood’s franchise arms race is making it harder for original films to get the attention they deserve from moviegoers, creating a cycle in which audiences only show up for the biggest blockbusters because studios have conditioned them to only buy tickets for those kinds of films, leading studios in turn to chase after the next big franchise to the expense of everything else.“…the movie business has changed on all fronts. But the most ominous change has happened stealthily and under cover of night: the gradual but steady elimination of risk. Many films today are perfect products manufactured for immediate consumption. Many of them are well made by teams of talented individuals. All the same, they lack something essential to cinema: the unifying vision of an individual artist. Because, of course, the individual artist is the riskiest factor of all.”“The situation, sadly, is that we now have two separate fields: There’s worldwide audiovisual entertainment, and there’s cinema. They still overlap from time to time, but that’s becoming increasingly rare. And I fear that the financial dominance of one is being used to marginalize and even belittle the existence of the other.”Martin Scorsese’s latest film, “The Irishman” screens in select theaters this weekend and will stream on Netflix on November 27.Read original story Martin Scorsese Expands on Marvel Criticism in New York Times Op-Ed: ‘Nothing Is at Risk’ At TheWrap

  • Martin Scorsese says Marvel movies have 'no mystery and no risk' in New York Times op-ed essay
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    Ben Arnold

    Martin Scorsese says Marvel movies have 'no mystery and no risk' in New York Times op-ed essay

    In the story which won't go away, Martin Scorsese himself has sought to clarify his comments over the Marvel movies personally.

  • Martin Scorsese says he was mulling making 'Joker' for four years
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    Ben Arnold

    Martin Scorsese says he was mulling making 'Joker' for four years

    Martin Scorsese's connection to the Joker movie runs much deeper than we previously thought.

  • Francis Ford Coppola clarifies those 'despicable Marvel' comments
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    Ben Arnold

    Francis Ford Coppola clarifies those 'despicable Marvel' comments

    Francis Ford Coppola has clarified the comments in which he dubbed the Marvel movies 'despicable'.

  • Julie Andrews jokes she was 'too stoned' on painkillers to take role in 'The Wolf of Wall Street'
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    Ben Arnold

    Julie Andrews jokes she was 'too stoned' on painkillers to take role in 'The Wolf of Wall Street'

    Mary Poppins and Martin Scorsese aren't necessarily a natural fit, but nonetheless, Julie Andrews was all set to appear in the Goodfellas director's last movie The Wolf of Wall Street.

  • Joel Kinnaman says James Gunn's 'The Suicide Squad' is 'so funny' and feels like a comedy
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    Tom Beasley

    Joel Kinnaman says James Gunn's 'The Suicide Squad' is 'so funny' and feels like a comedy

    Joel Kinnaman described 'The Suicide Squad' as his 'first comedy' and praised James Gunn's script, as well as weighing in on the Martin Scorsese comic book movie debate.

  • Martin Scorsese clarifies blockbuster 'theme park' comparison, backs streaming to give filmmakers opportunities
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    Tom Beasley

    Martin Scorsese clarifies blockbuster 'theme park' comparison, backs streaming to give filmmakers opportunities

    Martin Scorsese said that Marvel and other blockbusters represent a 'different cinema form'.

  • 'Hellboy' director Neil Marshall says comic book movies are 'pure cinema' (exclusive)
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    Tom Beasley

    'Hellboy' director Neil Marshall says comic book movies are 'pure cinema' (exclusive)

    The director of 'Hellboy' says it was wrong for Martin Scorsese to 'segregate' comic book movies away from the rest of cinema.

  • Bob Iger Compares ‘Black Panther’ to Scorsese and Coppola Films in Defense of Marvel Movies
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    The Wrap

    Bob Iger Compares ‘Black Panther’ to Scorsese and Coppola Films in Defense of Marvel Movies

    Disney CEO Bob Iger was the latest to leap to the defense of Marvel movies in the recent civil war among filmmakers over the blockbusters, pointing to Ryan Coogler’s Best Picture-nominated “Black Panther” as worthy as being called “cinema” as any film Martin Scorsese or Francis Ford Coppola have made.Iger got heated on the subject as part of the WSJ Tech Live event Tuesday night after both Scorsese, Coppola and a handful of other auteur filmmakers have criticized the movies, with Coppola most recently calling the films “despicable.”“I’m puzzled by it. If they want to bitch about movies it’s certainly their right. It seems so disrespectful to all the people who work on those films who are working just as hard as the people who are working on their films and are putting their creative souls on the line just like they are,” Iger said of filmmakers’ comments. “Are you telling me that Ryan Coogler making ‘Black Panther’ is doing something that somehow or another is less than anything Marty Scorsese or Francis Ford Coppola have ever done on any one of their movies? Come on.”Also Read: Jon Favreau on Scorsese and Coppola's Marvel Criticism: 'They Can Express Whatever Opinion They Like'Iger says he holds Coppola and Scorsese in “the highest regard,” but he took issue with Coppola’s characterization of the films as “despicable,” and that he’d only reserve that word “for someone who had committed mass murder.”“When Francis uses the words ‘those films are despicable,’ to whom is he talking? Is he talking to Kevin Feige who runs Marvel, or Taika Waititi who directs or Ryan Coogler who directs for us or Scarlett Johansson,” Iger said. “I don’t get what they’re criticizing us for when we’re making films that people are obviously enjoying going to because they’re doing so by the millions.”Scorsese recently doubled down on his comments when he said that Marvel movies were not cinema and compared them to “theme parks.” He ultimately said that Marvel’s films were “invading” movie theaters and replacing what young people’s idea of cinema is, even driving out smaller films and more human stories from the popular culture.Also Read: After Coppola Slam, James Gunn Defends Marvel Movies as Cinema (Again)Ken Loach, the British director behind “Kes” and the recent “Sorry We Missed You,” more specifically attacked the commercialism of Marvel films rather than their content specifically.“They’re made as commodities like hamburgers, and it’s not about communicating, and it’s not about sharing our imagination,” Loach told Sky News. “It’s about making a commodity which will make a profit for a big corporation – they’re a cynical exercise. They’re a market exercise, and it has nothing to do with the art of cinema. William Blake said, ‘When money is discussed, art is impossible.'”Iger however had a response for that as well, saying that there’s a mutual benefit in the success of the Marvel films and other blockbusters that allows movie theaters to exhibit movies that otherwise wouldn’t be as financially successful.Check out Iger’s full comments via WSJ.Read original story Bob Iger Compares ‘Black Panther’ to Scorsese and Coppola Films in Defense of Marvel Movies At TheWrap