• Michael B. Jordan Urges Hollywood to ‘Commit to Black Hiring’ at #BLM Protest
    Entertainment
    The Wrap

    Michael B. Jordan Urges Hollywood to ‘Commit to Black Hiring’ at #BLM Protest

    As a wave of peaceful protests coursed through Los Angeles on Saturday, actor Michael B. Jordan urged Hollywood to “commit to black hiring” at a rally in Century City.The “Just Mercy” actor called on all those in the entertainment industry, including studios and agencies, to “invest” in black talent. “You committed to a 50/50 gender parity in 2020,” Jordan said. “Where is the challenge to commit to black hiring? Black content led by black executives, black consultants. Are you policing our storytelling as well? Let us bring our darkness to the light.”Protesting police brutality and racial injustice, he encouraged everyone to speak out and supported all those attending the protest, saying, “we have to be here together.”Also Read: Watch John Boyega's Passionate Speech at Black Lives Matter London Rally: 'We Have Always Been Important' (Video)“What we are doing today will make our values heard and our voices heard. We’ve got to keep agitating things,” he said. “We can’t be complacent. We can’t let this moment just pass us by, we have to continue to put our foot on their necks.”Actor Michael B Jordan speaks to protestors “Where is the challenge to commit to Black hiring? Black content lead by Black executives, Black consultants.” (@producerTommy / @blacklovedoc) BlackLivesMatter BlackMediaMatters pic.twitter.com/0yCKwwSGOg— NICK HAMILTON (@NickHamiltonLA) June 6, 2020The actor came to prominence in 2013 by portraying Oscar Grant, a young black man needlessly killed in “Fruitvale Station,” and last year starred as justice-seeking attorney Bryan Stevenson in “Just Mercy,” about a wrongfully convicted black man. Both films are based on true stories.The protest in Century City was organized by Hollywood’s talent agencies.Read original story Michael B Jordan Urges Hollywood to ‘Commit to Black Hiring’ at BLM Protest At TheWrap

  • LA County Sheriff Will No Longer Enforce Curfews
    News
    The Wrap

    LA County Sheriff Will No Longer Enforce Curfews

    The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department will no longer be enforcing curfews, Sheriff Alex Villanueva said on Thursday.“Based upon current situational awareness and the recent pattern of peaceful actions by protesters, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department will no longer enforce a curfew. Other jurisdictions are free to make their own decisions,” Villanueva said in a statement.LA County also announced on Twitter that it wasn’t planning on setting any curfews for that evening, but added that “municipalities within the county have the legal authority to implement curfews for their jurisdictions and may do so.”Also Read: ACLU Sues Los Angeles City and County Over Curfew OrdersThe city of Los Angeles, Santa Monica, Culver City and West Hollywood also will not have curfews on Thursday night. Beverly Hills, meanwhile, is implementing a 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew on Thursday.Cities across LA County have enacted curfews this entire week, with some curfews in Beverly Hills and Santa Monica beginning as early as 1 p.m. on Monday. But on Wednesday, the ACLU of Southern California sued the city and county of Los Angeles over its curfews on behalf of Black Lives Matter Los Angeles and four other plaintiffs.“The curfews’ extraordinary suppression of all political protest in the evening hours plainly violates the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, and their blanket restrictions on movement outside working hours violate the Constitution’s protection of freedom of movement,” the ACLU said in a statement.Read original story LA County Sheriff Will No Longer Enforce Curfews At TheWrap

  • Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's security 'costs £7,000 a day'
    Celebrity
    Yahoo Style UK

    Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's security 'costs £7,000 a day'

    The prince and his wife are said to be spending thousands on their protection after moving to the US.

  • Los Angeles Looters Hit the The Grove, Rodeo Drive as National Unrest Mounts
    News
    Footwear News

    Los Angeles Looters Hit the The Grove, Rodeo Drive as National Unrest Mounts

    Protests across the country continue as unrest mounts in the wake of George Floyd's death.

  • Prince Harry praises coronavirus volunteers during video call from LA home: 'Helping people makes you feel better'
    Celebrity
    Yahoo Style UK

    Prince Harry praises coronavirus volunteers during video call from LA home: 'Helping people makes you feel better'

    Harry called young people who are delivering food and medicine to their neighbours.

  • Inside LA mansion where Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will celebrate second anniversary
    Celebrity
    Yahoo Style UK

    Inside LA mansion where Prince Harry and Meghan Markle will celebrate second anniversary

    The royal couple will be celebrating a quiet wedding anniversary and are believed to be staying in Tyler Perry's mansion.

  • Why Isn’t California a Bigger Coronavirus Hot Spot? State Still Has Fewer Cases Than New York
    News
    The Wrap

    Why Isn’t California a Bigger Coronavirus Hot Spot? State Still Has Fewer Cases Than New York

    California had 9,816 confirmed coronavirus cases, and 212 deaths, as of Thursday morning, according to the New York Times tracking service. In Los Angeles County, the total confirmed cases have totaled 3,518, according to the county’s Department of Public Health, while the number of deaths has reached 65.But public health experts wonder why the state — which recorded its first case of the novel coronavirus on Jan. 26 — has not seen as big a surge as hot spots like New York, which has reported 83,889 confirmed cases and 1,941 deaths as of Thursday — with 1,374 in New York City alone.California’s strict and early shutdowns of nonessential businesses and orders for residents to stay at home may have helped the state avoid an outbreak as severe as New York’s, but health experts told TheWrap that the worst is yet to come in California, and that big cities like Los Angeles still need to prepare for a potential onslaught of seriously ill patients in hospitals.“I want people to recognize that we’re going to see some things we don’t want to see. We’re going to see a lot more people sick and a lot more people die,” John Swartzberg, an infectious diseases and vaccinology specialist at the UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program, told TheWrap. “That’s going to happen no matter what we can do.”California COVID-19 Cases, Johns Hopkins researchAlso Read: CNN's Chris Cuomo Announces He Tested Positive for CoronavirusAs has been extensively reported, the data surrounding the number of coronavirus cases in the U.S. is flawed and imprecise, largely because not enough people are being tested. As of March 31, the California Department of Public Health reported the completion of 31,038 tests, with another 59,100 pending. That’s significantly less than the 220,880 New Yorkers who had been tested as of March 31, according to New York State’s public health department.Further, comparisons between states are flawed because of differences in population and population density. But in terms of the curve of infection, California appears to have made positive strides in reducing the severity of the outbreak, even though the numbers of cases and deaths have continued to increase significantly each day.“We are in a completely different place than the state of New York, and I hope we continue to be, but we won’t unless people continue practicing social distancing,” Gov. Gavin Newsom said during a Wednesday afternoon press conference.Also Read: California Gov. Gavin Newsom Orders All Residents Statewide to Stay at HomeStatisticaOne reason for that may be the early action on the part of state and local officials. On March 16, six counties in California’s Bay Area — San Francisco, Santa Clara, San Mateo, Marin, Contra Costa and Alameda — announced a “shelter in place” order and closed nonessential businesses, launching one of the strictest orders issued in the U.S. at the time. Three days later, Los Angeles followed suit with a “safer at home” order, hours before California’s governor issued a statewide “stay at home” order that will last indefinitely.George Rutherford, the head of UCSF’s Division of Infectious Disease and Global Epidemiology, said that “shelter in place” or “stay at home” orders are most effective when they’re put in place before there’s widespread transmission of a highly contagious disease. “All our indications are that this is working,” Rutherford said of California’s early and aggressive social distancing measures.There are, of course, other geographic or cultural factors that may have given California an advantage in its fight against COVID-19 compared to states like New York, public health experts told TheWrap.Some of the main factors influencing a region’s infection rate include the number of people, the average distance between people, the number of interactions people are having with one another, whether people are moving between centers of infection, when the virus arrived, public health interventions and the number of tests conducted, Robert Siegel, a microbiology and immunology professor at Stanford, said.Also Read: LA County Closes All Public Beaches, Trails and Piers Through April 19And in New York, certain lifestyle differences — such as the concentration of people living and working in small areas and the widespread use of the subway and other public transport systems — means that more people are interacting more closely with one another. “Even in grocery stores, because of the cost of real estate, their aisles are closer together. So they have a lot of interactions,” Siegel said.Neal Baer, an adjunct professor in UCLA’s Department of Community Health Sciences, said that Los Angeles’ “car culture,” together with the city’s “safer at home” order, could be another “critical reason” as to why Angelenos have not yet seen as high a number of cases. “That’s not to say that people don’t get exposed in Los Angeles, but maybe we’re less exposed,” Baer said. “Two weeks ago, we were already sheltering, and we were in our cars weeks before then.”Still, health experts said that maintaining aggressive social distancing measures — alongside increasing the number of tests, protective gear and medical equipment like ventilators and ICU beds in hospitals — will be key to reducing the severity of the coronavirus outbreak in California and, for that matter, any other state in the U.S.“If it’s not done uniformly across the country,” Rutherford said, “the virus is going to continue to get reintroduced into the places that have done the right thing, and our effort will be for naught.”And aggressive measures on a city, state and federal level, health experts cautioned, can’t end when the coronavirus pandemic seems to be waning, either.“People say that we couldn’t afford to, but we’ve somehow found the money to fund a standing army that’s the largest in the world. And the reason we’ve done that is because the population believes that we need to protect ourselves, not from a war that’s happening now, but from a war that might occur,” Swatzberg said. “We know there’s going to be recurrent pandemics. There always have been and there are going to be until our science is a lot better. Why haven’t we prepared for that?”Read original story Why Isn’t California a Bigger Coronavirus Hot Spot? State Still Has Fewer Cases Than New York At TheWrap

  • 'Highlander' actor Stan Kirsch, 51, died by suicide: medical examiner
    Entertainment
    Yahoo Celebrity

    'Highlander' actor Stan Kirsch, 51, died by suicide: medical examiner

    Los Angeles County Medical Examiner-Coroner records state Kirsch’s manner of death was ruled a suicide.

  • Fine wines, trendy cuisine and fancy flights: How to experience LA like Meghan Markle
    News
    Yahoo Style UK

    Fine wines, trendy cuisine and fancy flights: How to experience LA like Meghan Markle

    The final countdown has begun; at long last, it’s just three days until Meghan Markle and Prince Harry tie the knot at Windsor castle.And as Markle’s family members are arriving in the UK as we speak, her home back in Los Angeles is probably far from the bride-to-be’s thoughts.Us Brits are thoroughly invested in the royal wedding back here in the UK, of course. But we can’t help but wish we could trade homes with the actress right now.Holiday season is fast approaching, and as we dream of sandy beaches from our small, rainy country, it’s around now that we’ll start browsing for all-inclusives in Europe or local countryside getaways.For once, however, how about we think a little bit more Markle?Her lifestyle blog The Tig may be no longer, but the world still had time to glean what Markle’s favourite spots, activities and restaurants were back in The Big Orange.With help from Air New Zealand, we’ve rounded up Markle’s favourite LA spots and the fanciest travel options so that you can follow in her footsteps.Follow us on Instagram and Facebook for non-stop inspiration delivered fresh to your feed, every day. For Twitter updates, follow @YahooStyleUK. Read more from Yahoo Style UK:How will Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s royal wedding compare to her previous nuptials?Why do we have flower girls, page boys and bridesmaids at weddings?Sleep tips: How to grab some shut eye the night before your wedding day

  • Stripper Poles, Mini Bars, & Putting Greens: Hollywood’s Hottest Closet Designer Tells All
    News
    Nora Crotty

    Stripper Poles, Mini Bars, & Putting Greens: Hollywood’s Hottest Closet Designer Tells All

    Photo: @laclosetdesign/Instagram The Internet went bonkers, last week, over photographs of (one of) Khloe Kardashian’s stupendously stunning closet, dedicated entirely to her workout clothes and sneakers. You might recognize some of their names: Beyond Kardashian, Adams has gotten intimate with the intimates of stars like Christina Aguilera, Fergie, Tyra Banks, Giuliana Rancic, and Ray Romano. We spoke with Adams over the phone about her bevy of celebrity clients, their craziest design requests, the latest trends in storage, and perhaps most importantly, how to deal if your closet space is… less than desirable.