• Kylie Jenner Made $170 Million in the Past Year
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    Harper's Bazaar

    Kylie Jenner Made $170 Million in the Past Year

    Sister Kim Kardashian earned $72 million, according to new Forbes rankings.

  • Amanda Seyfried slams influencer for 'flaunting' privileged lifestyle in bikini selfie
    Style
    Kerry Justich

    Amanda Seyfried slams influencer for 'flaunting' privileged lifestyle in bikini selfie

    Amanda Seyfried is the latest to take aim at Arielle Charnes after she posted a photo of her post-baby body.

  • Love Island star mocked over obvious Photoshop fail
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    Penny Burfitt

    Love Island star mocked over obvious Photoshop fail

    Love Island's Arabella shared a 'throwback' to her Instagram but fans instantly noticed a hilarious tell tale sign of photoshop.

  • Working from home might be seriously impacting your mental health
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    Caroline Allen

    Working from home might be seriously impacting your mental health

    There’s a lot more to working from home than meets the eye, and some people are left feeling lonely.

  • What is vaginal bacteria and why is it so important?
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    What is vaginal bacteria and why is it so important?

    The vagina contains both good and bad bacteria.

  • British people reach peak happiness at 68, research finds
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    Caroline Allen

    British people reach peak happiness at 68, research finds

    The best days are yet to come. At least, they are for anyone under the age of 68.

  • Meghan Markle mum-shamed for how she held Archie - but experts say she's done nothing wrong
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    Marie Claire Dorking

    Meghan Markle mum-shamed for how she held Archie - but experts say she's done nothing wrong

    "Can someone please show Meghan how to hold a baby?"

  • 'Why should I have to work on stilts?': the women fighting sexist dress codes
    Style
    The Guardian

    'Why should I have to work on stilts?': the women fighting sexist dress codes

    Too many female employees are forced to wear high heels, or skirts, or even a particular type of bra. But the resistance is growing. It was at the beginning of a shift at Harrods that Georgia Brown told her manager where to go. Brown, then aged 22, was working for a temp agency that supplied shop assistants to the department store. She cannot remember the name of the manager. But she does remember why she lost her cool: she had had enough of being forced to wear heels on the job. “Not just a mini-heel, but proper black stilettos. Bear in mind, you’re on your feet in Harrods all day – you can’t sit down,” says Brown. When she arrived at work, there was a mandatory uniform check, after which she would slip into flat shoes. This time, she got caught. “I said: ‘My feet hurt; who are you to tell me I have to work on stilts?’,” says Brown. After Brown’s outburst, Harrods notified her agency, and she was fired. This all happened 10 years ago – and Harrods says that Brown’s experience does not represent the situation for workers now. The store’s current policy is that staff adhere to high standards of personal grooming and “dress appropriately for their day. This means that they are empowered to express their personal style, and are very much trusted to represent our brand to the highest of standards.” Still, Brown’s situation will be all too familiar to many women. In May, a row erupted after British Airways flight attendants were warned not to wear bras in certain colours or shapes under their blouses. “It’s a bit extreme, saying you must wear a white bra under a white shirt,” says Claire Simpson of Unite, the union that represents most cabin crew, who is herself a former flight attendant. Whether or not you agree with Mary Beard’s statement to shoe designer Manolo Blahnik this week that high heels are a “symbol of women’s oppression”, the fact remains that if men do not have to wear them, nor should women. Bunion-inducing stilettos, skirts so tight you are forced to walk with a coquettish wriggle, or gossamer-thin blouses in fiercely air-conditioned offices: women are often the victims of workplace dress codes, whether or not they wear uniforms. But as women’s workwear increasingly becomes a more public battleground in the fight for equality, this may change. Simpson is pleased that Virgin Atlantic now gives female crew the choice of trousers or a skirt and they no longer have to wear makeup. She points out, though, that while airlines are increasingly allowing women to wear flat shoes, progress is slow. It is not illegal for employers to impose dress codes on women alone. “We haven’t yet got to the position where you can say: ‘Having high heels in a dress code is unlawful,’” says the barrister Harini Iyengar, who specialises in employment and discrimination law. This issue was brought to the fore by the receptionist-turned-Coronation Street actor Nicola Thorp – arguably the champion of the new workwear movement. She made headlines in 2016 after being sent home from her agency job at accountancy firm PricewaterhouseCoopers for refusing to wear heels. A petition calling for the mandatory wearing of high heels to be made illegal received more than 152,000 signatures, and prompted a parliamentary inquiry into workplace dress codes. It concluded that further work was needed to strengthen the Equality Act 2010 and protect workers from discrimination, including increased financial penalties for employers that break the law. The problem, says Iyengar, is that it is hard to prove that being forced to wear high heels is discriminatory on the basis of sex – unless it is in a job that requires heavy lifting. “In a workplace where it’s the norm and all your colleagues are wearing heels – aside from the heavy-lifting example – it’s much harder for somebody without a medical certificate to say to an employer: ‘High heels are bad in general.’” The same applies for being made to wear makeup or skirts at work: unless you can show it is contrary to your gender identity or sexual orientation, there is not much you can do. Whatever the law may say, though, women are increasingly refusing to put up and shut up. In Japan, the #KuToo movement has called on the government to ban employers from forcing women to wear heels. Employers are also seeing it as simply good PR to keep up with the times. “In recent years, there has been a relaxation in the uniform codes as far as hair and makeup are concerned,” says Simpson. “It’s about choice – and modern values being reflected in the uniform standard.” Obviously, our wardrobes reflect the changing status of women in society. The fashion historian Deirdre Clemente says that, as women become more emancipated: “They push the boundaries of prescribed work-environment clothing.” The compulsory wearing of tights, she says, changed in the 1990s: “Women wanted bare legs.” Especially in the summer. Throughout the decade, dress codes were steadily relaxed, as casualwear brands such as Gap redefined corporate attire. “We started to see things like trouser suits, more casual dresses, maybe trousers and a matching sweater,” says Clemente. If in the 80s, women wore power suits to project an image of masculine strength – the women’s rights lawyer Gloria Allred wore hers in red for the first 25 years of her career – as today’s women feel more settled in the workplace, they adopt a relaxed, athleisure-inspired silhouette. “Women are wanting to wear tank tops to work now, or yoga pants to a meeting,” says Clemente. But, she says, a double standard still persists: “Women are held to such a different public standard in their appearance to men. That will not change until there’s full equality.” Even the most slovenly man is generally considered OK, provided he wears a suit and tie and remembers to shave. But, for women, corporate dressing is often full of obligations that may not be set out in formal dress codes. It took more than a decade before Iyengar felt comfortable wearing flat shoes to work. “Definitely at the beginning of my career, when I struggled to fit in, I wouldn’t have dared not to wear heels. I regret that I went along with it when I was younger, but it’s difficult to swim against the tide,” she says. Women of colour are disproportionately policed when it comes to complying with written or unwritten dress codes. When Tara Williams worked as a lawyer in Philadelphia from 2010, she usually spent Sunday nights frowning at her wardrobe, trying to figure out which outfit would not get her into trouble the next day at work. Williams used to wear J Crew suits in black, navy pinstripe, charcoal tweed, light grey, and navy cotton, but she kept being told by her superiors that her outfits were brash or unprofessional. “There was this constant belittling and implication that I was not playing by the norms.” The problem seemed to be the colour of the shirts she was wearing. “If I wore anything other than a light blue shirt, like a white or a red, I would receive these comments,” Williams remembers. “They’d say: ‘Oh, that’s loud.’” Once, when she wore a berry-coloured coat, she was ridiculed by a senior associate, who told her she looked “like Mrs Claus”. When she was being chastised, Williams would often look around the office and see another woman wearing the same J Crew outfit. “When you’re a brown person, particularly if you have dark skin, you’re seen as over-the-top when you reach outside of grey or black.” Her experience is not uncommon. Dr Janet Ainsworth, a professor of law at Seattle University, says: “White employees do not have their hairstyles policed in any way, but employees of African ancestry are told they can’t wear braids or Afros.” Ainsworth wrote a 2013 paper that looked at 73 cases in which employees were sacked for dress-code violations. Her conclusion was disturbing. “[Employers wanted] women to look ultra-feminine, wear makeup, feminine-looking clothing and so forth. And African-ancestry women should look as white as possible.” Some women get ahead by rejecting the double standard entirely. One medical researcher tells me that when she started wearing jeans and T-shirts to work, people stopped asking her to make coffee in meetings, because only a scientist would dress so casually. (This approach is backed up by a 2014 study published in the Journal of Consumer Research into the so-called “red-sneaker effect”, which found that employees who deviate from standard dress codes are perceived more favourably by their peers.) Kate Rosh Bertash, 32, who works in cybersecurity and lives in LA, has revolutionised her wardrobe with the help of the eight identical black wrap dresses that she has worn daily since January 2017. Part of Bertash’s motivation for adopting a uniform was her struggles to find work-appropriate clothing as a plus-sized woman. “Things would pull and gap in strange places.” It is also more environmentally friendly. But wearing the same dress is about more than just convenience or sustainability. It is a feminist act. Bertash says: “There’s this stress that women put ourselves under to either be noticeable, or novel, or fashionable, and look like we’re always trying, whereas men wear the same thing pretty much every day … I think most of us have parts of that process and the trappings of femininity and professionalism that we don’t like, and don’t bring us happiness, and suck up a lot of time.” She still dresses up for special occasions – she recently wore a blue evening gown to a wedding – but not having to think about her wardrobe on a daily basis is freeing. “I expend a lot of creative energy on my work. It’s nice not to have to expend it on my clothing.” Her advice to anyone thinking of doing the same thing? Make sure the outfit has pockets. “That in itself is very life-changing.” Why does it matter what women wear in the workplace? Because what we wear matters. Women chafe against sexist dress codes for the same reason we protest against the rolling-back of abortion rights; because, like regulation polyester blouses, they make us itch. “Don’t tell me how I should control my body, or how I should present myself. That’s my personal choice,” Clemente says. The pushback is particularly pronounced right now, because we’re living in increasingly feminist times. “It’s a big culmination of all of those years where women didn’t have a voice to say: ‘I’m not wearing this outfit’, and they silently either had to suffer, or band together a little bit and say: ‘We’re not wearing pantyhose.”’ Williams ended up transferring to a different office after the negative comments got too much. She gave the berry-pink coat to charity, but now she wears all the colour she wants. “I have a dress in the exact same colour, and I’m very proud of it,” she laughs. “So that’s the replacement.”

  • How period tracking can give all female athletes an edge
    Style
    The Guardian

    How period tracking can give all female athletes an edge

    A whole new ball game … the all-conquering US women, who employed a menstrual cycle adviser. Photograph: Brad Smith/ISI/Rex/ShutterstockUntil relatively recently, sports scientists simply applied the research they had done with male athletes to female ones. In fact, according to research scientist Georgie Bruinvels, it is only since the 1990s that it has been “appreciated that women are different”. There is still a long way to go. In 2014, researchers looked at sports studies published between 2011 and 2013; where performance was concerned, once they removed one study that heavily skewed the result, they found that just 3% of participants were women.One particular growing area of interest is the impact of menstrual cycle and hormones on female sports performance – and this is where Bruinvels specialises. This week, the Times reported that after, advising the World Cup-winning US women’s football team, she is in talks to work with British female tennis players.In the past, an athlete’s period was merely something to be endured, usually in uncomfortable silence, when in fact, a menstrual cycle can have consequences for performance. “Hormonal fluctuations can affect things like biomechanics, laxity of ligaments and muscular firing patterns,” says Bruinvels.It has been shown that, for anterior cruciate ligament injuries (that is, damage to the knee), “the first half of the cycle and particularly the build-up to ovulation is the key risk window”. That is not to say don’t exercise then, Bruinvels adds. “It’s more about being proactive around warming up properly or recovering properly, at certain times.”It is also about understanding how your body responds to training. In the first half of the menstrual cycle, Bruinvels says, your body uses carbohydrates more efficiently (depending on the exercise’s intensity); in the second, it is better at using fats. “There is a body of research emerging that highlights that strength training is more advantageous in the first half of the menstrual cycle – the body adapts and recovers better.” Tracking your cycle with apps (including FitrCoach, which Bruinvels developed) can help tailor training and diet to work with your cycle, rather than against it.The England women’s hockey team have been tracking their periods since before the 2012 Olympics, the team’s former captain Kate Richardson-Walsh has said. Their strength and conditioning coach found a pattern with soft-tissue injuries: “We would send a text on day one of our cycle, so he could mark it on our training calendar. He tried to monitor – as much as you can with a squad of 28 women – our training loads depending on our menstrual cycle.” The British tennis player Heather Watson was widely praised in 2015 for being a rare athlete to talk about her period and the symptoms that led her to crash out of the Australian Open.As research and support for the needs of female athletes lags behind, the English Institute of Sport launched its SmartHER campaign this year to educate coaches, physios and athletes. Do most female athletes track their cycles, then? “You’d think so,” says Bruinvels, “but I’ve been really surprised that they don’t.”

  • Secondary school students give a silent standing ovation during autistic classmate's graduation
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    Francesca Specter

    Secondary school students give a silent standing ovation during autistic classmate's graduation

    Loud noises can be “overwhelming, stressful or uncomfortable” for those with autism.

  • Meghan and Harry should be 'less Hollywood' royal expert claims
    Style
    Caroline Allen

    Meghan and Harry should be 'less Hollywood' royal expert claims

    She says it’s the palace’s job to encourage Meghan and Harry to become “less Hollywood glamour and more royal."

  • School uniforms in Wales will be gender neutral from September
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    School uniforms in Wales will be gender neutral from September

    The move follows a consultation with parents where uniform policies were described as 'outdated.'

  • Meghan Markle text friend Prince Harry 'was a catch' days into romance with him
    Style
    Francesca Specter

    Meghan Markle text friend Prince Harry 'was a catch' days into romance with him

    TV presenter Lizzie Cundy, 50, first met ‘Suits’ actress Markle, now styled as the Duchess of Sussex, back in 2013.

  • Your sun protection guide: SPF, UVB and UVA explained
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Your sun protection guide: SPF, UVB and UVA explained

    Because not all suncream is created equal!

  • Ariana Grande slammed for 'unrecognisable' Vogue cover: 'When did she become black?'
    Style
    Yahoo Style UK team

    Ariana Grande slammed for 'unrecognisable' Vogue cover: 'When did she become black?'

    "This is blackface. How do you think this is OK?"

  • Whatever became of urban myths? Were they replaced by fake news?
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    The Guardian

    Whatever became of urban myths? Were they replaced by fake news?

    The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts. Urban myths – alligators in the sewers etc – used to be very popular and some were gruesomely entertaining, so why have they disappeared? Have they been replaced by online conspiracy theories and fake news? Gwennan Jones, Michaelston-le-Pit, Vale of Glamorgan Post your answers – and new questions – below or email them to nq@theguardian.com

  • Tell us: have you remarried your partner after divorcing them?
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    The Guardian

    Tell us: have you remarried your partner after divorcing them?

    Does the marriage feel different the second time around? We’d like to hear from you. Are you a believer in second chances? Getting back with a previous lover can often be viewed as a no-go post break-up and whilst remaining friends with an ex can be possible, it’s not always the easiest of moves. So can re-marrying an ex-spouse work? If you and your partner have married, divorced and then married each other again, we want to hear from you. Did you think it could be possible? Did factors such as timing and self-improvement help your decision to re-marry? Share your experiences Why did the marriage break up initially, and what brought you back together again? How have things changed for you, and perhaps your family? Tell us your stories in the form below – one of our journalists may contact you to find out more about your experiences, and we will feature some of the best contributions. If you’re having trouble using the form, click here. Read terms of service here.

  • Piers Morgan calls Meghan Markle 'absurd' for no photos at Wimbledon request
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Piers Morgan calls Meghan Markle 'absurd' for no photos at Wimbledon request

    "This is so ridiculous, this obsession that her and Harry have about privacy."

  • Should we take our sex dreams seriously?
    Style
    The Guardian

    Should we take our sex dreams seriously?

    A recent study found women are having more saucy dreams. But what is the significance of our erotic reveries?. In certain areas of analysis, it has long been thought that dreams are a window into our unconscious desires. Which is troubling if you have just had a saucy dream about someone you really shouldn’t have. And a new study has suggested that women are having more erotic dreams than ever before (although still less than men). In a paper published in the Psychology & Sexuality journal, Michael Schredl, a sleep researcher at the University of Freiburg, Germany, found that the average frequency of erotic dreams for the 2,907 participants was about 18%. Younger people had more erotic dreams than older people. The researchers raised reasons for all of this – that feminism had made women less likely to be reticent in reporting erotic dreams, and that sex was not as big a part of waking life for older people as it was for younger ones. Mark Blagrove, a professor of psychology at Swansea University, says we should be cautious of retrospective studies – where people report remembered dreams, rather than keep a diary. In a 2007 study of more than 3,500 dream reports by Antonio Zadra, a researcher at the University of Montreal, the frequency of erotic dreams was 8% for both men and women. Women were more likely to have erotic dreams about current or previous partners; men were more likely to dream about multiple sex partners. Blagrove says he would have expected the figure to be higher than 8%, from work he has done on dreams. “You tend to dream of what’s more emotional to you. For that reason, you might expect there to be more erotic content than there actually is.” Tension or problems in waking life may also be more likely to make it into your dreams. So an averagely happy sex life may not lead to X-rated dreams “because there’s nothing there that’s any concern or cause of tension”. Blagrove says it’s only about 15% of a dream “that you can actually relate to recent waking life concerns and events”. A 2014 study by Dylan Selterman at the University of Maryland looked at how dreams – particularly those about infidelity – affected participants’ behaviour with their partners the next day. What Blagrove found interesting was when they looked at participants’ previous day activities. “They couldn’t find anything that predicted erotic content. This means that erotic content does not have a simple one-to-one relationship with events or concerns of the previous day.” Does this mean there is no significance to erotic dreams? “From [this] study, I would say there is no simple relationship.” Dreaming of erotic content “may be almost by chance, or as a depiction of an important waking life concern or event.” Although he adds: “It may well mean something to the individual.” Enjoy, and be thankful that it could be worse – Schredl found 4% of his participants’ dreams were about politics.

  • What is 'dry drowning' and what are the signs and symptoms parents need to look out for?
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    Marie Claire Dorking

    What is 'dry drowning' and what are the signs and symptoms parents need to look out for?

    Everything you need to know before you head to the pool this summer.

  • Woman's breast cancer discovered after son refuses to feed from breast with tumour
    Style
    Marie Claire Dorking

    Woman's breast cancer discovered after son refuses to feed from breast with tumour

    The mum-of-two has hailed her son as her "guardian angel" who saved her life.

  • The number of new dads taking paternity leave has fallen for the fourth year running
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    Marie Claire Dorking

    The number of new dads taking paternity leave has fallen for the fourth year running

    Less than one third of eligible new fathers took paternity leave.

  • Twitter community helps autistic girl with heartwarming viral tweet
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    Caroline Allen

    Twitter community helps autistic girl with heartwarming viral tweet

    This woman uncovered the good side of Twitter.