• Malay heritage snack Roti Boyan still popular and easy to make
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    Reena Devi

    Malay heritage snack Roti Boyan still popular and easy to make

    You may have spotted this popular heritage snack at Malay food stalls around Singapore. Called Roti Boyan (Bawean), they are either shaped into round or square pastries and deep fried till golden brown. The filling is made of potatoes, onions, celery, spring onions, pepper, salt and egg mixed well together.

  • Singapore playgrounds turn heritage icons in upcoming exhibition
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    Reena Devi

    Singapore playgrounds turn heritage icons in upcoming exhibition

    This year, the National Museum of Singapore (NMS) is presenting a blockbuster exhibition on the historical development of Singapore’s playgrounds and projections of future playgrounds in Singapore. Titled “The More We Get Together: Singapore’s Playgrounds 1930 – 2030” and running from 20 April to 30 September, the exhibition is developed by the museum in collaboration with the Housing Development Board.

  • The historic and untouched Tiong Bahru Air Raid Shelter to open to public for art exhibition
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    Reena Devi

    The historic and untouched Tiong Bahru Air Raid Shelter to open to public for art exhibition

    Some of the young artists being featured at the RAID exhibition (from left): Ivan David Ng, Nhawfal Juma’at, Jacqueline Sim and Vanessa Lim. As part of an exhibition for Singapore Art Week 2018 organised by young artists, from this weekend members of the public get to step inside the rarely opened Tiong Bahru Air Raid Shelter. The last remaining pre-war civilian air raid shelter still in existence today, Tiong Bahru Air Raid Shelter is also the only public housing building by the Singapore Improvement Trust to have been built with an air raid shelter as part of its design.

  • Healing New Orleans: Apothecary Spots in the Creole City
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    Noël Duan

    Healing New Orleans: Apothecary Spots in the Creole City

    New Orleans has always been a site of healing — even before the French Mississippi Company officially founded the Louisiana city in 1718. 1300 years before Europeans colonized the swampy land, the Mississippi culture, a mound-building Native American civilization, thrived in the bayou, using the herbs of the land for healing rituals linked to the cycles of agriculture. After les Français and los Españoles moved in with their European-trained pharmacists and brought in African slaves who had their own medicinal traditions, Louisiana’s apothecary heritage became as creole as its music, cuisine, and language.