'Star Wars': Greedo actor Paul Blake is as confused about 'Maclunkey' as everyone else

Tom Beasley
Contributor
Greedo in 'Star Wars: A New Hope'. (Credit: Lucasfilm)

The actor who played Greedo in Star Wars: A New Hope was left “confused” when he heard his character appear to shout “Maclunkey” before his death in the latest revision of the film, uploaded to Disney+.

Paul Blake was the man behind the bounty hunter’s alien face in the 1977 movie, but told Empire he didn’t even hear about the controversial new edit until he received a text from co-star Mike Carter, who played Jabba the Hutt acolyte Bib Fortuna.

Blake said: “Disney or Lucasfilm, they're the last people that ever inform us of anything really – unless it's the lawyers, then we hear from them pretty quick.”

The 71-year-old actor said he has “no idea” what to make of the new change to the scene.

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“I couldn't understand a word of it. It confused me incredibly,” he added. “But I've never understood anything about the movies anyway, particularly that.”

The scene, which introduces rogue pilot Han Solo, has been a source of fierce debate for Star Wars fans over the years as a result of George Lucas’ constant tinkering.

Paul Blake as Greedo with Han Solo in 'Star Wars: A New Hope'. (Credit: Lucasfilm)

In the original, theatrical cut of the movie, Harrison Ford’s character guns Greedo down after the alien threatens him.

However, in the Lucas-supervised Special Edition of the movie released in 1997, Greedo fires off a shot at Han first and misses, allowing the hero to kill him.

Subsequent versions have featured further changes to the scene, with the two characters now seemingly firing simultaneously after Greedo yells the already infamous word.

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Because it’s the only line Greedo speaks that doesn’t get a subtitled translation, “Maclunkey” itself has provoked discussion as well as ridicule among fans, though it appears the fateful word may have some history in the Star Wars canon.

EW editor James Hibberd has traced the word back to dialogue from pod racer Sebulba in prequel The Phantom Menace, in which it appears to translate to “it will be the end of you”.

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The ongoing debate over the most controversial scene in Star Wars history will continue to rage, and it seems Blake will continue to enjoy observing the chaos from afar.

He said: “What's really cool is that all the fans feel such an involvement with those early three movies, on anything new that happens.

“A new bit like this will create a storm of opinion again.”

It certainly will.