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One of the Best All-inclusive Resorts in the U.S. Just Added Incredible Tree Houses

See inside the gorgeous new tree houses at Twin Farms, in Barnard, Vermont.

<p>Claude-Simon Langlois</p>

Claude-Simon Langlois

One of New England’s best nature-surrounded hotels is about to go even farther in on the great outdoors. Twin Farms in Barnard, Vermont, recently added eight tree house suites to its already stunning lineup of one-of-a-kind suites and cottages — just in time for the hotel's 30th anniversary. The Relais & Châteaux hotel is known for its unique accommodations, with each of the 20 boasting a distinctive design. Now, like the farm itself, the tree houses will bring a new sense of playfulness to guests looking to reconnect with nature.

The cantilevered tree houses — each named after a native bird of Vermont — stand on stilts 20 feet off the ground and are accessed via a wooden bridge (meaning they are accessible to all travelers). Each one features a curvilinear terrace overlooking the leafy forest of maple, ash, and beech trees, a king-size bed facing the woods, a separate living area with cozy seating around a contemporary suspended gas fireplace, and a bathroom with a deep soaking tub, separate shower stall, and double vanity.

<p>Claude-Simon Langlois</p>

Claude-Simon Langlois

And while the details and decor are certainly luxurious, it’s hard not to feel like a kid again, with the abundant trees cocooning you in a cozy, woodland embrace. Whether it’s lounging in the Adirondack chairs on the deck, bird-watching from the deep soaking tub, or admiring the forest canopy from your plush bed, it’s easy to while away the day immersed in nature — without leaving your room.

“The addition of the tree houses at Twin Farms was a natural fit,” said John Graham, managing partner at Twin Farms, of the multiyear project. “The experiences created throughout each tree house lends perfectly to Twin Farms’ history of integrating a sense of whimsy and playfulness, while also incorporating the key pillars of the Farm: adventure and our love of nature.”

<p>Claude-Simon Langlois</p>

Claude-Simon Langlois

The interior design, by Michaelis Boyd (known for their design of Soho House in NYC), features a neutral color palette accented with lavender, pink, and celadon, and plenty of reclaimed wood. It’s inspired by the Japanese concept of wabi sabi, which embraces imperfections and showcases the beauty in them, a practice that spoke to the owners of Twin Farms.

“Each material was carefully selected to celebrate form and gesture, leaving visible traces of the craftsman that lies behind,” says Chelsea Rowe, director Michaelis Boyd. “Legible brush strokes, hand carved forms, and natural textiles honor the authenticity of raw beauty.”

<p>Claude-Simon Langlois</p>

Claude-Simon Langlois

For example, the wooden bowls and cutting boards in the rooms from Vermont-based artist Andrew Pearce are “seconds,” meaning they have slight defects. Local artists Charlie Shackleton and Miranda Thomas, who already collaborate with hotel, contributed custom walnut and maple dining tables and pottery pieces that emphasize their craftsmanship.

Nature is also a key player in the design, with oversized windows onto the balcony that bring the outside in. And while it may seem coincidental to have a bird’s-eye view in a tree house, every view is intentional.

<p>Claude-Simon Langlois</p>

Claude-Simon Langlois

“The tree house interiors give way to serene vignettes, and carefully framed views that soften boundaries between interior and exterior, encouraging the dappled light filtered through the treetops to be an active participant in the design,” Rowe said.

While you’re enjoying childhood nostalgia, you can also partake in some of the outdoor-focused activities at the farm that will also help: swimming, boating, and fishing in the pond; archery and lawn games like croquet and cornhole; and sledding, skiing, and ice skating come winter. The perfect activity that mixes nostalgia with luxury? A hike to a gourmet picnic, lovingly prepared in a secluded spot somewhere on the property’s 300 acres.

<p>Claude-Simon Langlois</p>

Claude-Simon Langlois

The debut of the new tree houses follows the 2022 launch of Twiggs, the Farm’s new dining concept that joined the acclaimed tasting menu by chef Nathan Rich in the main dining room. The first four tree house are now bookable and the final four launch at the end of the year.

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