Kannada star Puneeth Rajkumar's untimely demise sparks conversation about increasing heart ailments among youngsters

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New Delhi [India], October 29 (ANI): When it comes to ailments related to the heart, there is not any set age limit, as was seen with the untimely demise of Kannada star Puneeth Rajkumar and prior to that of actor Sidharth Shukla, which once again spotlighted people's attention to the rising cases of heart attacks amongst younger people.

For the unversed, Puneeth breathed his last breath on Friday at the age of 46 after he was admitted to a hospital for chest pain. Prior to that, Sidharth, who was only 40, had died of a massive heart attack on September 2.

2021 also witnessed the death of Mandira Bedi's husband and filmmaker Raj Kaushal, who succumbed to cardiac arrest at the age of 49. Earlier, 'Bandish Bandits' fame Amit Mistry had died due to a heart attack. Former Indian cricket captain Sourav Ganguly, too, suffered a heart attack in January this year. He underwent an angioplasty and had two stents implanted to open up his blocked cardiac arteries.

Similar incidents and cases have led people to give a thought over why there is an increase in heart attacks among the younger age group.

Speaking on the subject, Dr Shuchin Bajaj, Founder and Director, Ujala Cygnus Group of Hospitals told ANI, "We all know that exercise is good for a healthy body, but some youngsters and actors like to push past healthy limits which can lead to heart damage and rhythm disorders. Some people may feel shortness of breath, palpitations, chest pain or dizziness and these all are warning signs. We suggest moderate exercise for good physical and mental health."

Explaining factors responsible for the increased heart ailments among youngsters, Dr Shuchin added, "High levels of cortisol from long-term stress can increase blood cholesterol, triglycerides, blood sugar, and blood pressure. These are common risk factors for heart disease. This stress can also cause changes that promote the buildup of plaque deposits in the arteries. Actors are ambitious and they need to be in almost perfect shape to shine on the screen. However, we advise not to push past healthy limits as this can lead to heart-related ailments. The recent death of actor Siddharth Shukla revealed a shocking trend in increasing poor cardiovascular health among actors and young Indians."

Adding to this Dr Bharat B Kukreti, Unit Head and Associate Director Cardiology, Paras Hospitals Gurgaon said, "People under stress are more likely to smoke, overeat and tend to neglect their health. Stress hormone released in the blood increases chances of clot formation and inflammation."

Shedding light on the trend of extreme workout and its effects, he continued, "Youngsters and actors often tend to hit the gym for long hours, thinking it would yield a better result. In reality, research has found that high-intensity exercise can acutely increase the risk for sudden cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death in individuals with underlying cardiac disease."

Speaking about how these heart problems can be tackled, Dr Shuchin said, "Both stress and intense workouts must be managed for a healthy heart. A healthy lifestyle can curb cardiovascular diseases and also lower the risk of developing other chronic illnesses like diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, and hyperglycemia. Routine exercise and a proper diet can play a vital role in tackling these heart problems."

He also explained that apart from routine exercise and a proper diet, yoga also improves heart health by increasing circulation and blood flow. It can help lower blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood glucose levels, as well as the heart rate, which all can add up to a lower risk of hypertension, stroke, and heart disease.

ANI also got in touch with fitness coach Yogesh Bbhateja to know about how one can look after their heart in the best manner possible.

"You don't have to really go hard on your heart to become healthier. It's absolutely okay to relax and calm down. If my days are long and have a lot of workloads, I make sure I do not work out that day... I give rest to my system. In order to look fit, you can't necessarily work out for hours. Your body, too, deserves a break. Take proper sleep; eat healthy, exercise whenever you can. Even if you work out four times a week then that's also fine," he said, adding that diet also plays a major role in lowering the risk of heart diseases.

In conclusion, the message is to make people understand that someone's demise should not be the reason for one to start looking after their health, and people should pledge to do everything in their hands to keep the heart beating because, without a healthy heart, the road to severe ailments starts. (ANI)

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