Jim Caviezel set to reprise Jesus role in Passion of the Christ sequel

Ben Arnold
·Contributor

Jim Caviezel is in talks for the sequel to Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ, reprising his role as Jesus.

Caviezel’s reps ICM have confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter that he’s in negotiations with Gibson to star in the movie.

According to reports, Randall Wallace, the screenwriter who penned the 2004 movie, is working on the script to The Passion of the Christ: Resurrection.

Though it’s not officially confirmed, it’s expected that Gibson will likely direct and probably producer the movie too.

Caviezel told USA Today: “There are things that I cannot say that will shock the audience. It’s great. Stay tuned.

“I won’t tell you how he’s going to go about it. But I’ll tell you this much, the film he’s going to do is going to be the biggest film in history. It’s that good.

“Braveheart, that’s a film that took a long time to be able to crack. The same thing for Passion. And the same thing for this. He’s finally got it. So that is coming.”

The original movie, shot in Italy, was a huge risk to make, not least because of the starkly graphic violence used in the crucifixion scenes, but notably also because Gibson insisted on using Hebrew, Latin and Aramaic dialogue.

However, it paid off – costing $30 million to make, it grossed a massive $612 million worldwide.

It remains the highest-grossing r-rated movie of all time.

News emerged last year of Gibson’s plan to film the resurrection.

“Big subject. Oh, my God,” Gibson said. “We’re trying to craft this in a way that’s cinematically compelling and enlightening so that it shines new light, if possible, without creating some weird thing.”

Meanwhile, Caviezel, who is a devout Roman Catholic, and famously refused to film love scenes in the movie Angel Eyes, is set to play another biblical role.

He’s starring as Paul in Paul, Apostle of Christ, out in March in the US.

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