'Hemingway’s Daughter' Grants Readers a New Look at the Life of the Legendary Writer

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Christine M. Whitehead’s new novel introduces readers to the fictional daughter of Ernest Hemingway, to critical acclaim.

Earnest Hemingway had three sons but ached to have a daughter. In Hemingway’s Daughter, Christine M. Whitehead answers an important question: What if he did?

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The book, represented by Mind Stir Media, introduces readers to Finn Hemingway, who knows for a fact that she's been born at the wrong time into the wrong family with the wrong talents, making her three dreams for the future almost impossible to attain. She burns to be a trial lawyer in an era when Ruth Bader Ginsburg is being told to type and when a man who is 500th in his law school class is hired over a woman who is first in hers.

She yearns to find true love when the family curse dictates that love always ends for the Hemingway’s, and usually, it ends badly. And finally, she longs to have an impact on the only thing that matters to her father: his writing. To accomplish that would require a miracle. All three dreams are almost impossible, but it's the "almost" that keeps Finn going.

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While much of what we know of Ernest Hemingway comes from writing and research of the legendary writer’s life, this book gives readers the unique opportunity to reimagine Hemingway as family. Whitehead’s historically based writing captures many real events and people on the page, helping breathe life into an alternate reality of Hemingway’s Daughter.

Not only was the book praised for the way history is infused throughout the pages, but reviewers and critics also cite the very real, gut-wrenching statements it makes about gender politics during the 1900s as an eye-opening aspect. The balance of gripping plot and historical significance leads readers through a wide array of emotions.

Kristi Elizabeth from City Book Review, San Francisco said, “I read this book in one day because the pages kept turning themselves. It made me cry. It made me laugh. It made me cheer. I recommend this book to anyone who appreciates a story written like a piece of art instead of just words on a page."

Diane Donovan from Mid West Review shared similar praise, pointing out the way a fictional main character highlighted many real characters in historical fiction. “Christine Whitehead does an excellent job of winding the realities of writer Hemingway's fiery personality with the fictional presence of a daughter who must make her own way in life under the umbrella of her father's fame,” she said.

If there was a perfect person to tell the story of a woman interested in law and writing, it’s Christine Whitehead. Whitehead is from New England and currently practices divorce law in Hartford, Connecticut, although her true passion consists of writing novels. She writes from her farm in rural Connecticut, where she is surrounded by her lovable dogs, horses, and one cat. You can learn more about her at www.christinewhitehead.com.

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