Advertisement

FAA Prepares for Busy Airports and Skies Ahead of 2024 Solar Eclipse — What Travelers Can Expect

The eclipse also comes ahead of what the FAA predicts will be the busiest week of the season thanks to the spring break holiday.

<p>Grant Faint/Getty Images</p>

Grant Faint/Getty Images

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is warning travelers to pack their patience and prepare for potential delays and airport snags if they’re flying during the total solar eclipse next month.

The FAA said travelers who are located along the path of totality should expect limited airport parking and potential flight delays “due to the high volume of aircraft and drones attempting to witness the total solar eclipse.” The eclipse, which has been dubbed the Great American Eclipse, is expected to cross the country from Texas all the way to Maine on April 8.

The eclipse comes ahead of what the FAA predicts will be the busiest week of the season thanks to the spring break holiday. The administration said Thursday, April 4, will be the most crowded day in the sky with a total of 50,670 flights expected to take off. That will be followed by a total of 48,904 flights taking off on Friday, April 5.

“Whether you are headed to the sun or headed to the solar eclipse, the FAA is working to make sure you get to your destinations safely,” the administration said in a statement.

On the day of the eclipse itself, a total of 47,137 flights are predicted to take to the skies, according to the FAA. That includes several solar eclipse sightseeing flights that will take travelers above the clouds to see the rare phenomenon, including from Delta Air Lines, Southwest Airlines, and semi-private jet company JSX.

Like any other flight, travelers hoping to see the total solar eclipse from the sky must go through Transportation Security Administration (TSA) screening at the airport and should pack accordingly. The FAA also reminded passengers they cannot pack e-cigarettes, vaping devices, or spare lithium batteries in checked luggage.

Beyond flights, there are plenty of ways to see the total solar eclipse from the ground as well from campgrounds to hotels, and even some ski slopes.

For more Travel & Leisure news, make sure to sign up for our newsletter!

Read the original article on Travel & Leisure.