Demisexuality, grey-sexuality, akiosexuality: The many shades of asexuality

·1-min read
Asexuality exists on a spectrum, and asexual individuals approach sexual intimacy in different ways.

They have little or no desire for other people, however, asexual individuals are not all alike and do not experience sexual attraction in the same way.

Sometimes referred to as "ace" or "aces," asexual individuals are often misunderstood. In fact, their sexual orientation is often wrongly mistaken for a condition or a disorder. This is not the case. Asexual individuals simply do not experience sexual attraction or desire. However, they can form romantic relationships, but these might often be platonic.

Like other sexual orientations, asexuality isn't a choice. An asexual individual may respond to sexual stimulation without wanting to have sex, or they may engage in a relationship for the sexual pleasure of their partner.

In one of the few surveys on the subject, a 2017 US poll reveals that 4% of 18-34 year olds identify as asexual, compared to 1% or less of those over 35.

Asexuality exists on a spectrum, and asexual individuals approach sexual intimacy in different ways. Within this spectrum, there are several subgroups. Grey-sexual people rarely experience sexual attraction, while demisexual people may feel desire if they meet a person and form a strong bond. Meanwhile, akiosexual people can feel an attraction that fades when it becomes reciprocal.

France's Association pour la visibilité asexuelle [Association for Asexual Visibility] stresses that: "Asexuality does not have to be 'diagnosed,' 'changed' or 'cured,' it is not a pathology. Asexual people, like people of all other sexual orientations, can live happy and fulfilling lives."

Mylène Bertaux

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