Carrie Fisher's brother stunned by forgotten death note from his sister

Carrie Fisher's brother stunned by forgotten death note from his sister

Carrie Fisher's brother has been left floored by a lost letter from his dead sister.

Todd Fisher was trawling through his late mother Debbie Reynolds' desk drawers, looking for memorabilia to hand to a pop-up museum linked to the new Star Wars movie, The Rise of Skywalker, when he came across the strange note written by Carrie he'd never seen before.

"Everything Debbie cared the most about, in terms of personal letters, was in there (desk) and I’ve been through that drawer, several times," Todd tells the New York Post, revealing it was a page ripped from a book by writer Adrian Tinniswood and had his sister's handwriting on both sides.

"Either it was something Carrie wrote long ago, because she was doing a story on death, or it just materialised from beyond," he adds. "She was writing as if she was dead and what it was like: 'I am dead. How are you? I’ll see you soon... I would call and tell you what this is like, but there is no reception up here'.

"Then it says, 'Cut. New scene, new setup, new heavenly location. I have finally got the part that I have been rehearsing for all my life. God gave me the part. This is the end of the road I have been touring on all my life'.

"It just blew my mind. I thought, 'Wow, why am I finding this right now?'"

Carrie died three years ago (16) after suffering a heart attack on a plane bound for Los Angeles from London and Todd tells The Post the holidays are always very difficult without his sister: "She never liked the idea that Christmas was just for a short period of time. In her mind, everybody should be giving gifts 24/7. That way we can shop all the time without any guilt. Shopping therapy was actually one of the best things for Carrie. It wasn’t so good for the bills later, but it was almost calming and soothing to her."

But he will always have the jackets she bought him every year: "It started back when she first had her own money, right after Star Wars. I have a closet full of memories."

And he'll also remember her by the art piece he bought to gift her on the Christmas she died: "She collected paintings of ugly children," he explains. "I happened to stumble on a very high-end oil painting of a very unattractive child. It was waiting for her, but she never got off the plane. So that painting now hangs on a wall, with the rest of her paintings."


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